Skip to main content

Kazakhstan's Ivan Dychko (R) fights Canada's Simon Kean during their quarterfinal Men's Super Heavy (+91kg) boxing match at the London Olympic Games August 6, 2012.

MURAD SEZER/REUTERS

Mary Spencer won't be bringing home a boxing medal from the London Games, but there is at least one Canadian with a shot.

Custio Clayton of Dartmouth, N.S., faces Freddie Evans of Great Britain in a Tuesday quarter-final bout which could book his berth to the medal round. He has already won two bouts in London, quietly going about his business with little fanfare.

A win over Evans, who will have the pro-Team GB crowd on his side, would guarantee Clayton at least a bronze medal. Evans is the No. 2 seed in the Olympic tournament in the 69-kilogram weight class, a southpaw from Cardiff, Wales.

Story continues below advertisement

The 24-year-old Dartmouth fighter and father of two small kids has already earned two victories in London, toppling Mexico's Oscar Molina Casillas and Australia's Cameron Hammond.

Clayton is Canada's last remaining boxer at the Games after Super Heavyweight fighter Simon Kean of Trois Rivieres, Que., lost out Monday night in the quarter-finals to Ivan Dychko of Kazakhstan in the 91-plus-kilogram weight class.

Kean had advanced to the quarters with a win over French fighter Tony Yoka. But Dychko was far more seasoned. Kean fell into a 5-2 hole by the end of the first round to his swift 6-foot-9 opponent, eventually losing 20-6.

"It's very hard against someone like that who is so tall and experienced, but he jumped in the ring and worked really hard, but he's a novice compared to a guy like that," said Canadian Olympic team coach Sylvan Gagnon. "The Canadian kids had a good training camp and terrific preparation. Now we look for the next experience, more competitions. If the government decides to invest more, it's going to get better, the kids can have more fights around the world, more training camps."

Kean and Gagnon acknowledged the Olympic venue of 10,000 fans and the vastly experienced competitors are far beyond anything the young fighter has yet to experience, but the chiseled 243-pounder has good potential.

"I felt a lot of stress, and I'm very disappointed about the result, but I'm happy for the experience," said Kean in French, translated by Gagnon.

Canada's last Olympic boxing medal was a silver earned by heavyweight David Defiagbon at the 1996 Atlanta Games. Super heavyweight Lennox Lewis was the last Canadian boxer to win Olympic gold when he did so in Seoul in 1988.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.
Cannabis pro newsletter