Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Support Quality Journalism.
The Globe and Mail
First Access to Latest
Investment News
Collection of curated
e-books and guides
Inform your decisions via
Globe Investor Tools
Just$1.99
per week
for first 24 weeks

Enjoy unlimited digital access
Enjoy Unlimited Digital Access
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){window.requestAnimationFrame(function() {var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))});}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1); // via darwin-bg var slideIndex = 0; carousel(); function carousel() { var i; var x = document.getElementsByClassName("subs_valueprop"); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } slideIndex++; if (slideIndex> x.length) { slideIndex = 1; } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; setTimeout(carousel, 2500); } //

In this file photo taken on June 26, 2015, Peru forward Paolo Guerrero celebrates after scoring his third goal against Bolivia during their 2015 Copa America football championship quarter-final match, in Temuco, Chile.

JUAN MABROMATA/Getty Images

Peru captain Paolo Guerrero was cleared to play at next month’s World Cup after a Swiss court on Thursday agreed to temporarily lift his doping suspension while it considered his appeal against a 14-month ban.

In the latest twist to a long-running saga that has kept the Andean country on tenterhooks, the Swiss Federal Tribunal acknowledged that it would be harsh for Guerrero to miss what is likely to be his only chance to play at the tournament.

“The President of the court took into account the setbacks of all types that the appellant, already aged 34, would suffer if [he] was prevented from participating in a competition that will be the culmination of his career as a footballer,” it said in a statement.

Story continues below advertisement

It also recognized that Guerrero, who tested positive for a cocaine byproduct – contained in a tea he drank – in October, “did not act intentionally or with significant negligence.”

The court, the last course of appeal in the sporting judicial system, said it would consider the merits of the appeal itself once it had the full reasoned decision from the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), which imposed the ban earlier this month.

Guerrero, who will almost certainly not have had another chance to play at the World Cup even if Peru qualified again, is now free to lead his country in their first appearance at the tournament for 36 years.

They face France, Australia and Denmark in Group C at the finals, which start on June 14.

’JUSTICE DONE’

Guerrero said in a statement issued by his lawyer that “justice has been done, at least partially,” and said he would continue the fight to clear his name.

He thanked the “millions of compatriots who have united with me, in thousands of different ways but with one common denominator; their undying affection.”

Guerrero has been on an emotional roller coaster since the positive doping test following a World Cup qualifier away to Argentina in October.

Story continues below advertisement

He was initially given a 12-month ban, starting in November, by soccer’s world governing body FIFA, which ruled him out of the World Cup. That was reduced to six months on appeal, putting him back in the tournament.

However, less than two weeks after the six-month ban ended in May, the CAS increased the ban to 14 months, again ruling out of the finals.

That decision followed an appeal by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), which considered six months as too lenient.

Guerrero has said that benzoylecgonine, a metabolite of cocaine, was found in his system because of a herbal infusion he drank that was contaminated with coca leaf, an ingredient in cocaine that is also widely used as a non-narcotic traditional remedy in South America.

The world players’ union FIFPro and the captains of Australia, Denmark and France backed Guerrero, pointing out that the CAS itself recognized that he did not seek to gain an advantage.

FIFPro said it was delighted with the result but added: “It is unfortunate that he has to endure such a protracted legal wrangle that is still not over.”

Story continues below advertisement

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies