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Soccer fans gather to watch Mexico take on South Africa in the opening game of the 2010 World Cup at Mexican restaurant El Jacal in Toronto on Friday, June 11, 2010. (Adrien Veczan/THE CANADIAN PRESS)
Soccer fans gather to watch Mexico take on South Africa in the opening game of the 2010 World Cup at Mexican restaurant El Jacal in Toronto on Friday, June 11, 2010. (Adrien Veczan/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

A Soccer Fan's Pub Guide

Toronto's World Cup hot spots Add to ...

Seeking camaraderie with the Cameroonians? Want to get sloppy with the Slovenians? Or rally with the Danish roligans? Whether you're a Francophile or Green Dragon fan, Globe T.O.'s comprehensive guide to eating, drinking and carousing will be an invaluable companion to your one-month pub crawl across the city.



<iframe width="600" height="400" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" marginheight="0" marginwidth="0" src="http://maps.google.ca/maps/ms?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=1585+Dundas+St+W,+Toronto,+Toronto+Division,+Ontario+M6K+1T9&oe=UTF8&msa=0&msid=118338445498035497639.00048877acb72c0153116&ll=43.664208,-79.399738&spn=0.024836,0.051413&z=14&output=embed"></iframe><br /><small>View <a href="http://maps.google.ca/maps/ms?f=q&source=embed&hl=en&geocode=&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=1585+Dundas+St+W,+Toronto,+Toronto+Division,+Ontario+M6K+1T9&oe=UTF8&msa=0&msid=118338445498035497639.00048877acb72c0153116&ll=43.664208,-79.399738&spn=0.024836,0.051413&z=14" style="color:#0000FF;text-align:left">World Cup T.O.</a> in a larger map</small>


UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

CHILE Ukrainian Cultural Centre of Toronto 83 Christie St.

National intel: The Casa Salvador Allende (a Canadian-Chilean cultural society based out of Toronto) organized a number of benefit events in the city as a result of the 2010 Chile earthquake. For the World Cup, however, it's all about soccer.

The pitch: Expecting a large crowd of Chileans to come cheer their team, the organization has rented out a large theatre room in the for the second and third Chile games.

The grub: Since both are morning games, the events will not likely be licensed, but will include a variety of edible Chilean treats such as empanadas.

CÔTE D'IVOIRE Teranga 159 Augusta Ave. (416) 849-9777

National intel: Star Didier Drogba broke his arm about a week before the World Cup began and is unlikely to play. But this is an important year for the Côte D'Ivoire. With the World Cup located in Africa for the first time, there will be increased pressure on African nations to compete at a high level, and many soccer pundits are picking this underdog team to make a big splash in the tournament in the country's 50th year of independence from French colonial rule. If the team goes far, many French and African nations may end up backing them.

The pitch: Although there are no official Ivorian bars or restaurants for the city's 3,000-odd expats, there is an official screening party at this Senegalese Kensington Market bar. For the faithful who might want to cheer on these African upstarts, go to Exotic-Canada (51 Dundas St. W., second floor, Mississauga) to buy traditional delicacies and soccer paraphernalia.

The grub: Traditional Ivorian dishes such as attiéké (grated cassava) and aloko (fried plantain).

ENGLAND The Duke of Gloucester 649 Yonge St. (416) 961-9704

National intel: With David Beckham's Achilles tendon in disrepair, Brits will make a mantra of the name Wayne Rooney, whose skills are perhaps matched by his most recent accolade: Professional Footballers' Association Players' Player of the Year.

The pitch: Built in Britain and shipped over piece by piece, the pub is a haven for the city's soccer-obsessed, particularly during the World Cup. Indeed, manager Mihir Shah expects such a large turnout during England's games that he is selling tickets in advance ($10). "When England played Nigeria [in the last World Cup] we had 139 English fans and three Nigerian fans," he says, laughing. "But everyone got along really well." The pub will open every day at 7 a.m. during the tournament, and for $20, those inclined to make a wager can enter a football pool, though Mr. Shah is quick to clarify that one of the pub's regulars is running it independently.

The grub: Let's talk about beer first, because in these circumstances, everything else is secondary. Pub will augment its regular offering of English brew on tap with beer from every country in the world group.

ENGLAND The Queen and Beaver Public House 35 Elm St. (647) 347-2712

National intel: With David Beckham's Achilles tendon in disrepair, Brits will make a mantra of the name Wayne Rooney, whose skills are perhaps matched by his most recent accolade: Professional Footballers' Association Players' Player of the Year.

The pitch: In a little more than a year it has established itself as one of the city's premier venues to watch international soccer. "We had 100 people packed in here during the Champions League," says owner Jamieson Kerr, whose resto will be open every day at 7 a.m. and aims to air every game.

The grub: Menu offers breakfast fare such as confit of rabbit and foie gras butter and even more elaborate entrees such as venison cobbler with sage and cheddar scones.

HONDURAS Plaza Flamingo 423 College St. (416) 603-8884

National intel: Since there is a relatively limited Honduran population in Toronto, there are few bars dedicated to Honduran soccer. That's not to say there won't be anywhere to watch it. Latin Americans tend to believe in solidarity (except Mexicans and Guatemalans, and Venezuelans and Guyanese, then there's Argentina and... oh, everyone else, and - oh, never mind). Still, though, they'll put aside their differences for soccer. Head towards the increasingly Latinized neighbourhood on St. Clair west of Bathurst.

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