Skip to main content

Canada’s top four tennis players and a retiring doubles standout have been selected to represent the country in a Davis Cup tie against the Netherlands next month.

Team captain Frank Dancevic picked Milos Raonic, Denis Shapovalov, Vasek Pospisil, Felix Auger-Aliassime and Daniel Nestor, who is retiring this fall, to the squad for the Sept. 14-16 indoor tie at Coca-Cola Coliseum.

“This is an important tie for us as we are hoping to maintain our place in the World Group for next year,” Dancevic said in a statement. “We believe that we belong among the elite nations and that we can aspire to win the Davis Cup trophy in the near future. To get there, we need to continue to work as a team and to build on our foundation that is already quite strong.

Story continues below advertisement

“The Netherlands will be tough opponents, but we are excited to get out on the court and give our all to get the victory. We will have the advantage of playing at home and we are looking forward to competing in front of the fans in Toronto.”

Raonic, the world No. 24, and No. 28 Shapovalov are the top-ranked singles players in the tie.

The Netherlands’ top player is No. 49 Robin Haase. The visitors also are bringing Thiemo de Bakker, Scott Griekspoor, Jean-Julien Rojer and Matwe Middelkoop.

Raonic, 16-6 in Davis Cup play, is scheduled to play his first tie since 2015. He lost in the fourth round of the U.S. Open on Monday against American John Isner.

Shapovalov, 19, is playing his fifth tie. He reached the third round of the U.S. Open, losing in five sets to Wimbledon finalist Kevin Anderson.

Auger-Aliassime, 18, is making his Davis Cup debut. He reached his first main draw of a Grand Slam at the U.S. Open.

Pospisil and Nestor, who turned 46 on Tuesday, are the veterans of the squad. It will mark Nestor’s 53rd tie since making his debut in 1992.

Story continues below advertisement

The winner of the tie will secure a spot in the World Group for 2019, while the loser will be relegated to Zonal Group I.

Report an error
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.
Cannabis pro newsletter