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Denis Shapovalov celebrates a point during his match against Ilya Ivashka at the St. Petersburg Open on Oct. 15, 2020.

ANTON VAGANOV/Reuters

Canadians Denis Shapovalov and Milos Raonic both are heading to the quarter-finals of the St. Petersburg Open.

The second-seeded Shapovalov, from Richmond Hill, Ont., beat qualifier Ilya Ivashka of Belarus 6-1, 6-4 in a second-round match at the ATP Tour 500 hard-court event on Thursday.

The sixth-seeded Raonic, from Thornhill, Ont., beat Alexander Bublik of Kazakhstan 6-3, 6-2.

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Shapovalov, the world No. 12, saved all five break points he faced and won 89 per cent of points when he got his first serve in.

“I am in good shape now and I played really well today,” Shapovalov said.

The Canadian will face No. 5 seed Stan Wawrinka of Switzerland in the quarter-finals on Friday. Their lifetime series is tied at 1-1.

“Wawrinka is a very tough opponent,” Shapovalov said. “I think he is in very good shape now. He played two difficult matches in this tournament. I think I’ve met him twice already. It is especially difficult to play against him when he feels confident. I think tomorrow will be a difficult match, but I think that I am also in good shape, and I also played very well in two matches here.”

Raonic, ranked 21st in the world, also was perfect facing his opponent’s break points, saving all four.

Raonic will face No. 4 seed Karen Khachanov of Russia in the quarter-finals.

Shapovalov is the highest seed left after top-seeded Daniil Medvedev of Russia lost 2-6, 7-5, 6-4 to American Reilly Opelka in the second round.

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No. 7 seed Borna Coric of Crotia faces Opelka, while No. 3 seed Andrey Rublev of Russia meets Great Britain’s Cameron Norrie in the other quarter-finals.

Canadian Félix Auger-Aliassime books spot in quarter-finals at Cologne Indoors

COLOGNE, Germany — Canada’s Félix Auger-Aliassime has advanced to the quarter-finals of the Cologne Indoors.

The third-seeded Auger-Aliassime, from Montreal, beat Swiss qualifier Henri Laaksonen 6-4, 6-1 in the second round of the ATP Tour 250 indoor hard-court event on Thursday.

Auger-Aliassime, who received a first-round bye, never faced a break point against Laaksonen.

The Canadian won 27 of 30 points (90 per cent) when he got his first serve in.

“When the nerves went away and I started feeling better and serving better and started going for my shots, I felt like I was getting the advantage in this match,” Auger-Aliassime said.

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It was Auger-Aliassime’s first match of the fall hard-court season, after he lost in the first round on clay at the French Open.

Auger-Aliassime will face world No. 82 Radu Albot of Moldova in the quarter-finals on Friday.

“He’s quick, he puts a lot of balls back,” Auger-Alassime said. "[The 5-foot-9 Albot is] among the short guys on the tour so not the biggest serve but I’m sure he can place it really well. It’s going to be tricky because maybe my approaches are going to come back more than today. Maybe my attack shots and forehands are going to come back more.

“I’m going to have to play one, two, three or more balls so I’m going to be ready for that challenge.”

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