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Felix Auger-Aliassime reacts after winning against Alex Bolt of Australia during their men's quarter-final singles match at the Adelaide International tennis tournament in Adelaide on Jan. 16, 2020.

BRENTON EDWARDS/AFP/Getty Images

Canada’s Felix Auger-Aliassime is off to the semi-finals of the Adelaide International.

The No. 2 seed from Montreal needed just 55 minutes to beat Australian wild card Alex Bolt 6-3, 6-0 in a quarter-final on Thursday at the ATP Tour 250 event.

Auger-Aliassime, 19, had eight aces, no double faults and won 90 per cent of points when he got his first serve in.

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Ranked 22nd in the world, Auger-Aliassime did not face one break point against the 157th-ranked Bolt.

Auger-Aliassime next faces No. 3 seed and world No. 18 Andrey Rublev of Russia in the semi-finals of the Australian Open tune-up event.

Rublev won their only previous meeting – on clay in Croatia in 2018.

American qualifier Tommy Paul faces South African qualifier Lloyd Harris in the other semi.

Meanwhile, Ottawa’s Gabriela Dabrowski and Croatia’s Darija Jurak have advanced to the women’s doubles final.

The No. 3 seeds beat Lucie Hradecka of the Czech Republic and Andreja Klepac of Slovenia 6-7 (6), 7-6 (3), 10-5.

Dabrowski and Jurak will face top seeds Yifan Xu of China and Nicole Melichar of the United States in the final. Dabrowski and Xu split up as doubles partners after last season.

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Meanwhile, French Open final opponents Ash Barty and Marketa Vondrousova delivered the same outcome at the Adelaide International: A dominating victory for the No. 1 player in the world.

The Australian beat Vondrousova 6-3, 6-3 at Memorial Drive to advance to the semi-finals.

The last time the players met in the final at Roland Garros, Barty won her first Grand Slam title. Vondrousova has failed to win a set against Barty in four matches.

Barty will next play American Danielle Collins, who beat No. 7-ranked Belinda Bencic 6-3, 6-1.

Barty lost her first match at the Brisbane International last week but has showed steady improvement in Adelaide.

“That is just a gradual progression of spending time on court and spending time in that competition mode,” Barty said.

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Aryna Sabalenka will meet Dayana Yastremska in the other semi-final on Friday.

Yastremska beat Donna Vekic 6-4, 6-3, while Sabalenka defeated second-seeded Simona Halep 6-4, 6-2.

Halep won the 2018 French Open and 2019 Wimbledon. She reached the Australian Open final in 2018.

Denis Shapovalov falls in ASB Classic quarter-finals to France’s Ugo Humbert

Auckland, New Zealand – Canadian Denis Shapovalov is out at the ASB Classic.

The second-seeded Shapovalov was ousted 7-5, 6-4 in the quarter-finals on Thursday by Ugo Humbert of France.

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Shapovalov couldn’t overcome too many unforced errors, with six double faults, including two to finish the match.

The 21-year-old Humbert, ranked 57th, took the straight-sets victory in one hour 28 minutes.

Shapovalov is currently the top-ranked Canadian at a career-high No. 13 and received a bye into the second round at the ASB Classic, an ATP Tour 250-level tune-up event for the Australian Open.

The 20-year-old from Richmond Hill, Ont., is one of four Canadians with a spot in the men’s main draw at the Grand Slam tournament alongside Montreal’s Felix Auger-Aliassime, Milos Raonic of Thornhill, Ont., and Vancouver’s Vasek Pospisil.

Humbert will face American John Isner in the semi-finals in Auckland.

Canada’s Leylah Annie Fernandez advances in Australian Open qualifiers

Melbourne, Australia – Canada’s Leylah Annie Fernandez toppled Romania’s Patricia Maria Tig 6-2, 6-3 on Thursday in a first-round qualifier at the Australian Open that originally began a day earlier.

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Fernandez, from Laval, Que., was leading Tig 6-2, 4-1 when play was suspended on Wednesday because of rain.

Meanwhile, Canadian Peter Polansky made a quick exit in qualifying on Thursday.

Polansky, from Thornhill, Ont., was ousted by France’s Alexandre Muller in a first-round qualifier 6-1, 6-2.

Muller only needed 54 minutes to win the match that was also originally scheduled for Wednesday but washed out.

Eugenie Bouchard of Westmount, Que., is set to face Maddison Inglis of Australia later Thursday in a second-round qualifying match.

Players need to win three qualifying matches to guarantee a spot in the main draw.

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No Canadian women have spots in the main draw after reigning U.S. Open champion Bianca Andreescu of Mississauga, Ont., dropped out because of a knee injury.

Canadians Steven Diez, from Toronto, and Brayden Schnur of Pickering, Ont., won their first-round qualifying matches on Wednesday.

The Canadian Press, with a report from The Associated Press

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