Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Support Quality Journalism.
The Globe and Mail
First Access to Latest
Investment News
Collection of curated
e-books and guides
Inform your decisions via
Globe Investor Tools
Just$1.99
per week
for first 24 weeks

Enjoy unlimited digital access
Enjoy Unlimited Digital Access
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Just $1.99per week for the first 24weeks
Just $1.99per week for the first 24weeks
var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){window.requestAnimationFrame(function() {var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))});}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1); // via darwin-bg var slideIndex = 0; carousel(); function carousel() { var i; var x = document.getElementsByClassName("subs_valueprop"); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } slideIndex++; if (slideIndex> x.length) { slideIndex = 1; } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; setTimeout(carousel, 2500); } //

Canadian tennis star Milos Raonic signs autographs at the Rogers Cup kick-off event in Toronto on July 21, 2016.

Aaron Vincent Elkaim/The Canadian Press

Canada's Milos Raonic doesn't feel any type of relief now that world No. 2 Andy Murray won't be in attendance at this week's Rogers Cup.

Raonic suffered his sixth-straight defeat to Murray earlier this month in the final at Wimbledon. The Briton has beat Raonic four times this year, including the semi-finals of the Australian Open, quarter-finals at Monte-Carlo and the finals at the Aegon Championships just before Wimbledon.

Despite the losing streak against the Scottish star, Raonic says that not having Murray in the field is more disappointing than comforting.

Story continues below advertisement

"I look forward to those things. I don't look ahead, but at the same time you want to face off against these guys," Raonic said Sunday at Aviva Centre. "I've struggled with him, but at the same time, the best player in the world [Novak Djokovic] is still at this tournament. And if you want to do well, you're going to have to try and find a way past him and many others."

The field at the Rogers Cup men's tournament took a hit last week when Murray announced his withdrawal from the event because of fatigue. A day later, world No. 3 Roger Federer and No. 4 Rafael Nadal also withdrew.

It was a big blow to the field, especially with Murray winning the event three out of the past seven years, including in 2015 in Montreal.

But it also gives the 25-year-old Raonic, from Thornhill, Ont., a sense of opportunity.

"I think it's something you sense and something you try to capitalize on but at the same time there's still many great players playing here and many guys that want to win," Raonic said. "So you still have to fight and find your way and really pay attention to yourself and not think that is the solution to anything. You still have to try and find a way to win matches.

"I don't think there is a difference really. I don't think there's a player that's bigger than tournaments. Players have missed these kinds of tournaments and slams in the past and those tournaments have gone on."

Still remaining in the field is three-time Rogers Cup winner and world No. 1 Djokovic. The Serb captured the event in 2007, 2011 and 2012.

Story continues below advertisement

The 29-year-old Djokovic has six titles so far this season – including a victory over Raonic at the BNP Paribas Open in March – but is coming off a loss to Sam Querrey at Wimbledon when the American upset him in four sets.

Djokovic said Sunday that Raonic, who reached his first career Grand Slam final at Wimbledon, is a player to watch in Toronto.

"I'm sure Milos is now more motivated than ever to really make that next step and try to get that Grand Slam title," Djokovic said. "He's definitely one of the players that we're going to see a lot of in the future. He works very hard and has John McEnroe on his team so he's really thriving to getting himself on and off the court."

The 6-foot-5 Raonic enters this week as the tournament's fourth seed and is 37-9 over all in 2016. That includes two wins over Federer, most recently in the semi-finals at Wimbledon.

With the tennis schedule now switching from grass to hard courts, it could also be an advantage for the world No. 7 righty. Raonic is 17-3 on hard court this year but says there won't be too many changes with his game.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies