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Milos Raonic serves against Rafael Nadal of Spain on day 10 of the 2017 Australian Open at Melbourne Park on January 25, 2017 in Melbourne, Australia.

Quinn Rooney/Getty Images

Milos Raonic is cutting his 2017 season short as injuries continue to plague the Canadian tennis star.

Tennis Canada announced Wednesday that Raonic has officially withdrawn from his final two events of the year — Vienna, an ATP 500 event, and the Rolex Paris Masters.

The big-serving Raonic, from Thornhill, Ont., has played in only three events (Washington, Montreal, Tokyo) since reaching the quarter-finals at Wimbledon in July. He missed seven weeks of the season following wrist surgery, and retired from his second-round match in Tokyo with an apparent calf injury.

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Although Raonic reached two finals in 2017, this is the first time since 2011 that he has failed to win a title. He has eight in his career.

Raonic, currently ranked 12th in the world, made Canadian tennis history in 2016 when he finished the year as the world No. 3.

Last years Top 5 (Andy Murray, Novak Djokovic, Raonic, Stan Wawrinka, and Kei Nishikori) have all ended their seasons early due to injuries.

Raonic is ending the year with a 29-12 record. His most notable win of the season came in his season-opening tournament in Brisbane, Australia, as Raonic defeated Rafael Nadal 4-6, 6-3, 6-4 in the quarter-finals.

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