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Eastman Kodak Co., the inventor of the hand-held camera, plans to stop making digital cameras, pocket video cameras and digital picture frames in the first half of 2012 in a bid to cut costs. The photography pioneer, which filed for bankruptcy protection last month, said on Thursday that it will instead seek licensees to expand its brand licensing program. It still plans to offer photo printing and desktop printing. In 2005, Kodak Canada donated its entire company archives to Ryerson University in Toronto. Here's a look at some of the hand-held cameras produced by the photography giant over the years.

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The Kodak Brownie Target Six-20, introduced in 1946 and discontinued in 1952. It featured a typical box Brownie design with decorative faceplate.

Credit Line: Courtesy Ryerson University Archives and Special Collections/Credit Line: Courtesy Ryerson University Archives and Special Collections

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Kodak No.1A Folding Pocket Camera, Model B Produced around 1905-1906, one of many folding camera designs Kodak patented in the mid-1890s.

Courtesy Ryerson University Archives and Special Collections/Courtesy Ryerson University Archives and Special Collections

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The Kodak "Petite" Camera Introduced in 1929 and discontinued in 1933. This folding camera came in a variety of colours, and was marketed toward women as a fashion accessory.

Courtesy Ryerson University Archives and Special Collections/Courtesy Ryerson University Archives and Special Collections

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The Kodak Vigilant Junior Six-20 A, simple folding camera produced in the 1940s. The retractable, slim design made this camera more portable and popular for travel photography.

Courtesy Ryerson University Archives and Special Collections/Courtesy Ryerson University Archives and Special Collections

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The Kodak Instamatic 154, introduced in 1964 and discontinued in 1969. The Instamatic line consisted of simply designed cameras with few adjustable parts, aimed at the consumer wanting easy 'snapshots.'

Credit Line: Courtesy Ryerson University Archives and Special Collections/Credit Line: Courtesy Ryerson University Archives and Special Collections

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The Kodak Stereo Camera, introduced in 1954 and discontinued in 1959. The two lenses produced side-by-side images of the same subject, which gave the image a 3D effect when viewed through a stereo viewer.

Credit Line: Courtesy Ryerson University Archives and Special Collections/Credit Line: Courtesy Ryerson University Archives and Special Collections

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The Kodak Brownie Starflash, introduced in 1957 and discontinued in 1965. The blue case was a later model, produced in the 1960s.

Credit Line: Courtesy Ryerson University Archives and Special Collections/Credit Line: Courtesy Ryerson University Archives and Special Collections

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The Kodak Digital Science DC40 produced around 1996, an example of Kodak's consumer-level digital camera offerings.

Credit Line: Courtesy Ryerson University Archives and Special Collections/Credit Line: Courtesy Ryerson University Archives and Special Collections

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