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A commuter reads on his Kindle e-reader as a subway train arrives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in this file picture taken March 18, 2011. Online retailer Amazon said on May 25, 2011, it would open a customer support centre in Edinburgh to provide technical support for its market-leading Kindle device, creating 500 permanent and 400 temporary jobs.

BRIAN SNYDER

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A commuter (L) reads on a Kindle e-reader while riding the subway in Cambridge, Massachusetts March 18, 2011. Publishers are adapting to rising sales of e-books, and the popularity of smart phones and tablets such as the iPad. The retail landscape has changed with Amazon becoming the dominant seller of books while countless book stores go the way of video rental stores. America's No. 2 book store chain, Borders, is bankrupt. Some authors have dropped their publishers entirely, self-publishing online and using social media to connect with readers. Picture taken March 18, 2011.

BRIAN SNYDER

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The Kobo comes populated with 100 free e-books, out-of-copyright classics, but has plenty of memory left for additional documents.

Kevin Van Paassen/Kevin Van Paassen/The Globe and Mail

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Kevin Van Paassen/Kevin Van Paassen/The Globe and Mail

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The original Amazon Kindle let users download books, newspapers and blogs over a wireless connection. It can carry about 200 books downloaded from Amazon.com, but is not yet available in Canada.

HO

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Sony's Reader Pocket Edition is displayed in this undated handout. Sony Corp will begin selling the e-book this month, heating up the competition with Amazon.com Inc in the small but fast-growing market for electronic readers.

HO

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The Kobo comes populated with 100 free e-books, out-of-copyright classics, but has plenty of memory left for additional documents.

Kevin Van Paassen/Kevin Van Paassen/The Globe and Mail

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JESSICA RINALDI

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Kobo eReader, created by a Toronto company whose majority owner is Indigo Books and Music, hits the Yankee Group?s sweet spot at a price of $149 (Cdn.).

Kevin Van Paassen/The Globe and Mail

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