Skip to main content

The game controller for a Sony Corp. PlayStation 4 console is displayed during the Sony E3 media event in Los Angeles, California, U.S., on Monday, June 10, 2013. Sony Corp. took the wraps off the PlayStation 4, its first new console in seven years, promising original content and fresh titles will revitalize demand and spark a comeback for the video-game industry it once dominated.

Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg

Sony Corp. has finally released pricing details about its new subscription gaming platform, PlayStation Now. Launching in Canada and the United States on January 13, the all-you-can-game service offers either a monthly or bundled rate that will allow players try games via online streaming without having to download or buy physical discs.

PlayStation Now is similar to such all-you-can-watch video services like Netflix, Shomi or CraveTV, or the all-you-can-read Marvel Unlimited comic book service. Pay a fee, consume your media, you don't own it but you are able to enjoy it in the time provided. Sony is kicking off the launch with a seven-day free trial, after that the price is $19.99 a month or $44.99 for three months.

Gamers can play through a library of more an 100 PS3 games, but at launch only owners of the newer PlayStation 4 console will be able to access the service. On the one hand, PS4 users may need it more since the console is not backwards compatible with PS3 game discs. On the other hand, no details were given on when it will roll out to other devices.

Story continues below advertisement

Some of the details, and a promotional video, were published on Sony's PlayStation blog. Available titles include indie darlings such as Spelunky and Papo & Yo; Sony exclusives such as God of War and Uncharted; as well as such third-party hits as Saints Row, Bioshock Infinite and Dead Island.

Just keep an eye on your data cap if you're playing in Canada.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter