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Facebook's log-in screen welcomes users to the social-networking site on Aug. 27, 2009.

Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press

A New Brunswick man posed on the Internet as a young girl, then contacted a 10-year-old girl on Facebook and tried to convince her to expose her breasts.

Andrew Michael Douglas, 22, of Saint John pleaded guilty in Hampton provincial court on Monday to using a computer to communicate with people under 18 years old for the purpose of producing child pornography.

He will be sentenced Feb. 21.

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The Crown said Douglas used a computer at a public library to gain control of a 13-year-old girl's Facebook account.

When Douglas logged into the computer, he changed her password and began posing as her online.

Prosecutor Karen Lee Lamrock said Douglas used the 13-year-old girl's social networking website to start a sexually explicit conversation with one of the girl's 10-year-old friends.

When the 10-year-old refused to expose herself, Douglas told her if she didn't show her breasts he would create a website about her and put her phone number on it.

The court was told that Douglas followed through with that threat and created a website with photos he copied from her Facebook page, including a picture of her in a bathing suit.

Lamrock said the 10-year-old girl was not the only person targeted and that Douglas had tried to get other girls to expose their breasts while he was posing as the 13-year-old on Facebook.

She said Douglas admitted to police that he used several online aliases to chat with girls.

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The court was told that Douglas has developmental delays and was not as responsible as he would otherwise be. Lamrock said she would not be asking the judge to jail Douglas as she normally would. Instead, she said she had worked out a joint submission with defence lawyer John King.

King explained that while Douglas has the body of a 22-year-old, his psychological age is much younger.

Lamrock and King asked the court to sentence Douglas to a two-year-probation order with numerous conditions, which include requiring him to participate in sex-offender counselling, attend a mental health assessment, allow police to search his home and not to use a computer or have access to email.

Lamrock said Douglas should also have to register for the sex offender registry and give police a sample of his DNA.

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