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A fake LVMH handbag purchased and shipped from a China based online website is displayed to the photographer outside a Louis Vuitton store in Chevy Chase, Maryland, October 5, 2010. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development estimates the amount of counterfeit goods and pirated copyrights in world trade grew from about $100 billion in 2001 to about $250 billion in 2007, the last year for which they have made an estimate. In the 2009 budget year, U.S. Customs agents and other officials made 14,481 seizures valued at $260.7 million dollars. Picture taken October 5, 2010. To match Special Report CHINA-PIRACY/ REUTERS/Hyungwon Kang (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS) Date: 26/10/2010

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A fake LVMH handbag (R) purchased and shipped from a China -ased online website is pictured next to products on display at a Louis Vuitton store in Chevy Chase, Maryland, October 5, 2010. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development estimates the amount of counterfeit goods and pirated copyrights in world trade grew from about $100 billion in 2001 to about $250 billion in 2007, the last year for which they have made an estimate. In the 2009 budget year, U.S. Customs agents and other officials made 14,481 seizures valued at $260.7 million dollars. Picture taken October 5, 2010. To match Special Report CHINA-PIRACY/ REUTERS/Hyungwon Kang (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)

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A Hong Kong address is seen on documentation included in a shipment of a fake LVMH handbag, purchased from a China-based online website, whilst the shipping label for the package had shown Guangzhou, China as the point of origin in this shipment delivered to the Reuters office in Washington, October 5, 2010. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development estimates the amount of counterfeit goods and pirated copyrights in world trade grew from about $100 billion in 2001 to about $250 billion in 2007, the last year for which they have made an estimate. In the 2009 budget year, U.S. Customs agents and other officials made 14,481 seizures valued at $260.7 million dollars. Picture taken October 5, 2010. To match Special Report CHINA-PIRACY/ REUTERS/Hyungwon Kang (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)

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A Reuters reporter examines a fake LVMH handbag purchased from a China-based online website in this shipment delivered to the Reuters office in Washington, October 5, 2010. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development estimates the amount of counterfeit goods and pirated copyrights in world trade grew from about $100 billion in 2001 to about $250 billion in 2007, the last year for which they have made an estimate. In the 2009 budget year, U.S. Customs agents and other officials made 14,481 seizures valued at $260.7 million dollars. Picture taken October 5, 2010. To match Special Report CHINA-PIRACY/ REUTERS/Hyungwon Kang (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)

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A customer uses a calculator whilst holding a fake foreign brand handbag in a store at Baiyun World Leather Market in the southern Chinese city of Guangzhou, September 29, 2010. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development estimates the amount of counterfeit goods and pirated copyrights in world trade grew from about $100 billion in 2001 to about $250 billion in 2007, the last year for which they have made an estimate. In the 2009 budget year, U.S. Customs agents and other officials made 14,481 seizures valued at $260.7 million dollars. Picture taken September 29, 2010. To match Special Report CHINA-PIRACY/ REUTERS/Tyrone Siu (CHINA - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)

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A customer looks through a catalogue of fake foreign brand handbags in a store at Baiyun World Leather Market in the southern Chinese city of Guangzhou, September 29, 2010. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development estimates the amount of counterfeit goods and pirated copyrights in world trade grew from about $100 billion in 2001 to about $250 billion in 2007, the last year for which they have made an estimate. In the 2009 budget year, U.S. Customs agents and other officials made 14,481 seizures valued at $260.7 million dollars. Picture taken September 29, 2010. To match Special Report CHINA-PIRACY/ REUTERS/Tyrone Siu (CHINA - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)

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A customer looks at fake foreign brand wallets in a store at Baiyun World Leather Market in the southern Chinese city of Guangzhou, September 29, 2010. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development estimates the amount of counterfeit goods and pirated copyrights in world trade grew from about $100 billion in 2001 to about $250 billion in 2007, the last year for which they have made an estimate. In the 2009 budget year, U.S. Customs agents and other officials made 14,481 seizures valued at $260.7 million dollars. Picture taken September 29, 2010. To match Special Report CHINA-PIRACY/ REUTERS/Tyrone Siu (CHINA - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS

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Offcuts of leather dumped in a refuse skip are seen close to a workshop where fake foreign brand handbags are made in the southern Chinese city of Guangzhou, September 30, 2010. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development estimates the amount of counterfeit goods and pirated copyrights in world trade grew from about $100 billion in 2001 to about $250 billion in 2007, the last year for which they have made an estimate. In the 2009 budget year, U.S. Customs agents and other officials made 14,481 seizures valued at $260.7 million dollars. Picture taken September 30, 2010. To match Special Report CHINA-PIRACY/ REUTERS/Tyrone Siu (CHINA - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)

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Shopkeepers selling fake bags wait for customers outside stores at Baiyun World Leather Market in the southern Chinese city of Guangzhou, September 29, 2010. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development estimates the amount of counterfeit goods and pirated copyrights in world trade grew from about $100 billion in 2001 to about $250 billion in 2007, the last year for which they have made an estimate. In the 2009 budget year, U.S. Customs agents and other officials made 14,481 seizures valued at $260.7 million dollars. Picture taken September 29, 2010. To match Special Report CHINA-PIRACY/ REUTERS/Tyrone Siu (CHINA - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)

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A workshop where fake foreign brand handbags are made is seen in the southern Chinese city of Guangzhou, September 30, 2010. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development estimates the amount of counterfeit goods and pirated copyrights in world trade grew from about $100 billion in 2001 to about $250 billion in 2007, the last year for which they have made an estimate. In the 2009 budget year, U.S. Customs agents and other officials made 14,481 seizures valued at $260.7 million dollars. Picture taken September 30, 2010. To match Special Report CHINA-PIRACY/ REUTERS/Tyrone Siu (CHINA - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)

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A Reuters reporter opens a shipment of a fake LVMH handbag purchased from a China-based online website which shows Guangzhou, China as the point of origin in this shipment delivered to Reuters office in Washington, October 5, 2010. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development estimates the amount of counterfeit goods and pirated copyrights in world trade grew from about $100 billion in 2001 to about $250 billion in 2007, the last year for which they have made an estimate. In the 2009 budget year, U.S. Customs agents and other officials made 14,481 seizures valued at $260.7 million dollars. Picture taken October 5, 2010. To match Special Report CHINA-PIRACY/ REUTERS/Hyungwon Kang (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)

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A shipping label on a fake LVMH handbag purchase shipped from a China-based online website shows Guangzhou, China as the point of origin in this shipment delivered to the Reuters office in Washington, October 5, 2010. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development estimates the amount of counterfeit goods and pirated copyrights in world trade grew from about $100 billion in 2001 to about $250 billion in 2007, the last year for which they have made an estimate. In the 2009 budget year, U.S. Customs agents and other officials made 14,481 seizures valued at $260.7 million dollars. Picture taken October 5, 2010. To match Special Report CHINA-PIRACY/ REUTERS/Hyungwon Kang (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)

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A China-based website displays fake LVMH handbags as seen on a Reuters computer screen in Washington, September 10, 2010. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development estimates the amount of counterfeit goods and pirated copyrights in world trade grew from about $100 billion in 2001 to about $250 billion in 2007, the last year for which they have made an estimate. In the 2009 budget year, U.S. Customs agents and other officials made 14,481 seizures valued at $260.7 million dollars. Picture taken September 10, 2010. To match Special Report CHINA-PIRACY/ REUTERS/Hyungwon Kang (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)

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Fake foreign brand handbags are displayed inside a store at Baiyun World Leather Market in the southern Chinese city of Guangzhou, September 28, 2010. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development estimates the amount of counterfeit goods and pirated copyrights in world trade grew from about $100 billion in 2001 to about $250 billion in 2007, the last year for which they have made an estimate. In the 2009 budget year, U.S. Customs agents and other officials made 14,481 seizures valued at $260.7 million dollars. Picture taken September 28, 2010. To match Special Report CHINA-PIRACY/ REUTERS/Melanie Lee (CHINACONFLICT SOCIETY BUSINESS - Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS) CONFLICT SOCIETY

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