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In 1999, RIM's first BlackBerry was a pager with wireless Internet -- and AA batteries

1999 - RIM950: A pager with wireless Internet and e-mail. It ran on an AA battery.

RIM

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2002 - BlackBerry 5810: Similar to RIM's earlier pagers but it was also the first BlackBerry that could make and receive phonecalls.

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2003 - BlackBerry 6210: Introduced BlackBerry messenger.

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2004 - BlackBerry 7100i: RIM makes a BlackBerry that looks like a phone. It also worked as a long-range digital walkie-talkie.

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2004 - Blackberry 7510: Another phone/long-range digital walkie-talkie.

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2005 - BlackBerry 8700

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2006 - BlackBerry Pearl: Slim and trendy, this phone was targeted at consumers rather than at business clients.

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2007 - BlackBerry 8800: Thinnest handset yet with built-in GPS with voice and on-screen driving directions.

RIM/The Canadian Press

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2007 - BlackBerry Curve 8300: Its QWERTY keyboard was touted as the smallest and lightest full keyboard BlackBerry to date, with much-improved screen resolution.

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2008 - BlackBerry Pearl Flip: First BlackBerry to fold up.

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2008 - BlackBerry Bold 9000: The first of the Bold series featuring rounded corners, aimed at high-end corporate users.

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2008 - BlackBerry Storm: The first time RIM gives up the physical keypad for a large touch screen with 'click' technology, unlike the iPhone. But the original model was plagued with software problems. Early criticism from reviews included, ‘The camera takes forever to focus. Calls sound choppy on speakerphone. Static mars the sound on Bluetooth headsets. And everything feels slow.’ When it was released, Engadget wrote, ‘On paper it sounds like the perfect antidote to our gripes about the iPhone, and in some ways it lives up to those promises -- but more often than not while using the Storm, we felt let down or frustrated.’

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2009 - BlackBerry Tour 9630: RIM introduced it as a 'world phone,' which means it can easily access voice and data services on networks outside the user's home country. This has proven popular with business users in the past. To appeal to the retail market, the Tour is loaded with multimedia features similar to those found in the BlackBerry Curve and Pearl, including a photo and video camera and media player.

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The Blackberry Torch 9800 smartphone is seen after being unveiled at a news conference August 3, 2010 in New York City.

Mario Tama/Getty Images

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The Blackberry Bold 9900-9930 unveiled in August, 2011.

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The Blackberry Torch 9810, released in August, 2011.

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The touch screen Blackberry Torch 9860-9850.

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BlackBerry Porsche Design P'9981, launched in June, 2012, and retails for $1,890.

Michelle Siu/The Globe and Mail

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Three BlackBerry Z10 devices are shown at an event in 2013. This marked the debut of the company's long delayed BB10 operating system.

Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail

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A BlackBerry Q10 is shown in 2013.

Graeme Roy/The Canadian Press

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The BlackBerry Passport device, seen at its launch in 2014.

Chris Young/The Canadian Press

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The BlackBerry Classic device, held by the company's CEO John Chen in 2014.

Mark Blinch/Reuters

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The BlackBerry Leap smartphone device is shown on March 3, 2015.

Pau Barrena/Bloomberg

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If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

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