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Smoke rises from destroyed structures following explosions at a military base, according to local media, in Bata, Equatorial Guinea, on March 7, 2021.

REUTERS TV/Reuters

A series of explosions at a military barracks in Equatorial Guinea killed at least 20 people and wounded more than 600 others on Sunday, authorities said.

President Teodoro Obiang Nguema said in a statement read on state television that the explosion was due to the “negligent handling of dynamite” in the military barracks located in the neighbourhood of Mondong Nkuantoma in Bata. He said that the explosion occurred at 4 p.m. local time.

“The impact of the explosion caused damage in almost all the houses and buildings in Bata,” the president said in the statement, which was in Spanish.

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The defence ministry released a statement late Sunday saying that a fire in a weapons depot in the barracks caused the explosion of high-calibre ammunition. It said the provisional toll was 20 dead and 600 injured, adding that the cause of the explosions will be fully investigated.

Earlier, the Health Ministry had tweeted that 17 were killed and the president’s statement mentioned 15 dead.

Equatorial Guinea, a tiny Central African country of 1.3 million people located south of Cameroon, was a colony of Spain until it gained its independence in 1968.

State television showed a huge plume of smoke rising above the explosion site as crowds fled, with many people crying out, “We don’t know what happened, but it is all destroyed.”

The Health Ministry made a call for blood donors and volunteer health workers to go to the Regional Hospital de Bata, one of three hospitals treating the wounded.

The ministry tweeted that its health workers are treating the injured at the site of the tragedy and in medical facilities, but feared people were still missing under the rubble.

Images on local media seen by The Associated Press show people screaming and crying running through the streets amid debris and smoke. Roofs of houses were ripped off and wounded people were being carried into a hospital.

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The blasts were a shock for the oil-rich Central African nation. Foreign Minister Simeon Oyono Esono Angue met with foreign ambassadors and asked for aid.

“It is important for us to ask our brother countries for their assistance in this lamentable situation since we have a health emergency (due to COVID-19) and the tragedy in Bata,” he said.

A doctor calling into TVGE, who went by his first name, Florentino, said the situation was a “moment of crisis” and that the hospitals were overcrowded. He said a sports centre set up for COVID-19 patients would be used to receive minor cases.

Radio station Radio Macuto said on Twitter that people were being evacuated within four kilometres of the city because the fumes might be harmful.

Following the blast, the Spanish Embassy in Equatorial Guinea recommended on Twitter that “Spanish nationals stay in their homes.”

This story has been corrected to show that state television is TVGE, not TGVE.

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