Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Support Quality Journalism.
The Globe and Mail
First Access to Latest
Investment News
Collection of curated
e-books and guides
Inform your decisions via
Globe Investor Tools
Just$1.99
per week
for first 24 weeks

Enjoy unlimited digital access
Enjoy Unlimited Digital Access
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){window.requestAnimationFrame(function() {var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))});}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1); // via darwin-bg var slideIndex = 0; carousel(); function carousel() { var i; var x = document.getElementsByClassName("subs_valueprop"); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } slideIndex++; if (slideIndex> x.length) { slideIndex = 1; } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; setTimeout(carousel, 2500); } //

Supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump climb a wall during a protest against the certification of the 2020 presidential election results by Congress at the Capitol in Washington on Jan. 6, 2021.

JIM URQUHART/Reuters

At least 25 domestic terrorism cases have been opened as a result of Wednesday’s deadly assault on the U.S. Capitol by supporters of President Donald Trump, U.S. Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy told a Democratic lawmaker on Sunday.

The Justice Department also said two more men were arrested in connection with the rioting on Wednesday.

Representative Jason Crow, a member of the House of Representatives Armed Services Committee, said McCarthy told him the Pentagon was aware of “further possible threats posed by would-be terrorists” in the days up to and including the inauguration of Democratic president-elect Joe Biden on Jan. 20.

Story continues below advertisement

“Long guns, Molotov cocktails, explosive devices and zip ties were recovered, which suggests a greater disaster was narrowly averted,” Crow, a former Army Ranger, said in a summary of his call with McCarthy.

McCarthy assured him the Pentagon was working with local and federal law enforcement to co-ordinate security preparations after what he described as “deficient law enforcement threat reporting” ahead of last Wednesday.

A second Republican U.S. senator called on Sunday for Trump to resign, saying the outgoing president could face criminal liability after the storming of the Capitol by his supporters shortly after he baselessly challenged the results of the Nov. 3 election and exhorted them to “fight.”

Five people died in the attack, including a police officer. A second police officer responding to the attack later died while off duty, but the cause has not been formally released.

Crow said he raised grave concerns about reports that active-duty and reserve military members were involved in the assault, and urged McCarthy to expedite investigations and courts-martial, and ensure no troops to be deployed on Jan. 20 were sympathetic to domestic militants.

McCarthy agreed to take “additional measures,” Crow said.

Separately, the Justice Department said in a statement that Larry Rendell Brock, of Texas, was arrested on Sunday and charged with one count of violent entry and disorderly conduct on the grounds of the Capitol. The government alleged Brock was identified as one of the individuals who was pictured holding a white flex cuff, which is used by law enforcement to restrain subjects.

Story continues below advertisement

Eric Gavelek Munchel, of Tennessee, was also charged with violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds. Photos show a person who appears to be Munchel carrying plastic restraints, the government said.

Both men were seen in photos in the Senate chamber. It was not immediately clear if they had attorneys.

Our Morning Update and Evening Update newsletters are written by Globe editors, giving you a concise summary of the day’s most important headlines. Sign up today.

Your Globe

Build your personal news feed

  1. Follow topics and authors relevant to your reading interests.
  2. Check your Following feed daily, and never miss an article. Access your Following feed from your account menu at the top right corner of every page.

Follow topics related to this article:

View more suggestions in Following Read more about following topics and authors
Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

' ].join(''); bioEp.init({ html: html, width: 608, cookieExp: 0, delay: 0, onPopup: function () { exitPopupPushAnalytics('popupDisplay') } }); } function popupClickSubscribe(tag) { exitPopupPushAnalytics('clickSubscribe-' + tag); var url = 'https://subscribe.theglobeandmail.com/#/digital?intcmp=promotions_cem1697-' + tag; window.location.href = url; } function exitPopupPushAnalytics(action) { window.analyticsLayer.push({ "event": "clickEvent", "clickEvent": { "testId": "cem1697", "feature": "promotions", "action": action, "type": "test", "label": action, "variantName": "experience", "segmentName": "popup" } }) }
To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies