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World At least 89 killed, dozens injured in Mexico pipeline explosion; Pemex defends response

Friends and relatives say a final goodbye after the funeral services for the victims of a Pemex pipeline explosion in Tlahuelilpan, Mexico, on Jan. 20, 2019.

Hector Vivas/Getty Images

A gasoline pipeline explosion in central Mexico last week killed at least 89 people, the country’s Health Minister said on Monday, while an official with the state-owned oil company defended its response to the leak.

There were also 51 people injured, Health Minister Jorge Alcocer told a morning news conference. Friday’s pipeline blast happened after hundreds of people had rushed to collect fuel from the gushing pipe.

Over the weekend, a series of possible missteps by the current government became clear, from the delay in shutting off the pipeline, to relatives saying fuel shortages caused by the government’s anti-theft policy attracted people to the leak.

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Mexican Attorney-General Alejandro Gertz said that any negligence by authorities is being investigated and that officials involved would be called in to answer questions this week.

“It’s a fundamental issue, the chronology of the events must become absolutely clear.”

A Pemex engineer told a news conference on Monday that at first the leak was just a “small puddle” but later grew into a “fountain.” Within 20 minutes of that assessment, the engineer said, the company was able to “take actions.”

It was not clear if those actions included shutting off the flow of fuel in the pipeline.

Pemex chief executive Octavio Romero said his team had followed protocol, though he would not confirm or deny if there was negligence or corruption related to the delay in closing the pipeline.

“Everything will be looked at,” he said.

This content appears as provided to The Globe by the originating wire service. It has not been edited by Globe staff.

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