Skip to main content
Canada’s most-awarded newsroom for a reason
Enjoy unlimited digital access
$1.99
per week
for 24 weeks
Canada’s most-awarded newsroom for a reason
$1.99
per week
for 24 weeks
// //

An aerial view of the Cuadrilla shale gas extraction (fracking) site at Preston New Road, near Blackpool in Preston, England. Operations at the shale gas extraction site were recently paused by Cuadrilla as a precaution after an earth tremor was detected by sensors.

Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

Britain will impose an immediate moratorium on fracking, the government announced on Saturday, saying the industry risked causing too much disruption to local communities through earth tremors.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s government had previously signaled its support for the shale gas industry as it seeks ways to cut Britain’s reliance on imports of natural gas which is used to heat around 80 per cent of Britain’s homes.

But fracking, which involves extracting gas from rocks by breaking them up with water and chemicals at high pressure, is fiercely opposed by environmentalists who say it is at odds with Britain’s commitment to reach net zero carbon emissions by 2050.

Story continues below advertisement

Saturday’s announcement comes as Johnson gears up for an election on Dec. 12.

“Exploratory work to determine whether shale could be a new domestic energy source in the UK ... has now been paused - unless and until further evidence is provided that it can be carried out safely here,” the business and energy department said in a statement.

The decision follows a report on an incident at a site run by British energy company Cuadrilla near Blackpool, northern England where a 2.9-magnitude tremor shook houses in August.

An anti-fracking campaign by local people emerged as a flashpoint in a growing climate activist movement opposing new fossil fuel projects around the world. Hundreds of protesters have been arrested over the past few years for trying to disrupt Cuadrilla’s operations.

“The toll this has taken on our lives is immeasurable,” said Maureen Mills, from Halsall Against Fracking. “The industry is all about itself and its shareholders. Our communities are left physically and mentally drained and devastated. For what?”

Campaigners resisting a vastly larger fracking industry in the United States also cheered Britain’s decision.

“This is a major step in our global struggle against fracking,” said Xiuhtezcatl Martinez, 19, youth director of climate justice group Earth Guardians, who has been opposing the industry in his home state of Colorado for almost a decade.

Story continues below advertisement

Fracking in England only resumed last year after two tremors prompted a seven-year moratorium.

The Blackpool incident was examined by the Oil and Gas Authority (OGA), which regulates and promotes Britain’s oil and gas industry.

Its report found it was not currently possible to predict accurately the probability or magnitude of earthquakes linked to fracking operations.

The energy department said it will not take forward proposed planning reforms for shale gas developments.

“After reviewing the OGA’s report into recent seismic activity ... it is clear that we cannot rule out future unacceptable impacts on the local community,” Business Secretary Andrea Leadsom said.

Other sources of natural gas would continue to contribute to Britain’s energy mix, she added.

Story continues below advertisement

Cuadrilla is 47.4 per cent owned by Australia’s AJ Lucas, while a fund managed by Riverstone holds a 45.2 per cent stake. There was no immediate comment from the company.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies