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A white van seized during an investigation into a series of parcel bombs is towed into FBI headquarters in Miramar, Florida, U.S. October 26, 2018. REUTERS/Joe Skipper

JOE SKIPPER/Reuters

The latest

  • U.S. authorities arrested 56-year old Cesar Sayoc of Aventura, Florida in connection with a wave of bomb threats against top Democrats and critics of President Donald Trump, the Justice Department announced Friday. In a press conference Friday, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions said Mr. Sayoc is in the custody of the FBI and has been charged with five federal crimes. He could face up to 58 years in prison if found guilty. FBI Director Christopher Wry said investigators had fingerprints of Mr. Sayoc on one of the packages. The possibility of other suspects has not been ruled out.
  • More packages were intercepted Friday, bringing the total to 13 so far. The FBI confirmed one package seized in Florida was for Cory Booker, a Democratic senator. CNN reported that another was addressed to James Clapper, a former national intelligence director and contributor to the network. Two others were addressed for Democratic Senator Kamala Harris in Sacramento, California and Democratic donor Tom Steyer.
  • Investigators had zeroed in on a Florida postal facility Thursday in efforts to track the suspicious packages to their source. U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said that Florida appeared to be the starting point for at least some of the bomb shipments, whose targets included former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and ex-president Barack Obama.
  • Mr. Trump – under pressure to tone down his often violent partisan rhetoric ahead of Nov. 6′s midterm elections – has instead doubled down, firing off tweets blaming a climate of political rancor on “the purposely false and inaccurate reporting of the Mainstream Media" and taking shots at CNN, which he called “lowly rated.” On Friday he tweeted claiming “'bomb' stuff” was distracting Republicans from building momentum in the midterms.


Where the packages were going

Wednesday:

Sent to John Brennan at CNN offices in NY

NEW YORK

Monday:

George Soros

residence in

Katonah, NY

Friday:

Package found addressed to James Clapper

Tuesday:

Clinton home in

Chappaqua, NY

MANHATTAN

Thursday:

Building associated

with Robert De Niro

NEW

JERSEY

Long

Island

0

1

KM

Philadelphia

Thursday:

Package addressed to Biden intercepted at a mail facility in New Castle, Delaware

MARYLAND

Baltimore

D.C.

Atlantic

Ocean

DELAWARE

Wednesday: Sent to Obama and Maxine Waters, intercepted at mail facility in Washington area

0

55

KM

MURAT YÜKSELIR AND JOHN SOPINSKI / THE

GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE:TILEZEN; OPEN-

STREETMAP CONTRIBUTORS; HIU; NEW YORK

TIMES; CNN

Wednesday:

Sent to John Brennan at CNN offices in NY

NEW YORK

Monday:

George Soros

residence in

Katonah, NY

Friday:

Package found addressed to James Clapper

Tuesday:

Clinton home in

Chappaqua, NY

MANHATTAN

Thursday:

Building associated

with Robert De Niro

NEW

JERSEY

0

1

Long

Island

KM

Philadelphia

Thursday:

Package addressed to Biden intercepted at a mail facility in New Castle, Delaware

MARYLAND

Baltimore

D.C.

Atlantic

Ocean

DELAWARE

Wednesday: Sent to Obama and Maxine Waters, intercepted at mail facility in Washington area

0

55

KM

MURAT YÜKSELIR AND JOHN SOPINSKI / THE GLOBE AND MAIL

SOURCE:TILEZEN; OPENSTREETMAP CONTRIBUTORS; HIU;

NEW YORK TIMES; CNN

Wednesday:

Sent to John Brennan at CNN offices in NY

NEW YORK

Monday:

George Soros

residence in

Katonah, NY

Friday:

Package found addressed to James Clapper, the former director of national intelligence

MANHATTAN

Tuesday:

Clinton home in Chappaqua, NY

Thursday:

Building associated

with Robert De Niro

0

1

KM

Long

Island

NEW

JERSEY

Philadelphia

Thursday:

Package addressed to Biden intercepted at a mail facility in New Castle, Delaware

MARYLAND

Baltimore

Wednesday: Sent to Obama and Maxine Waters, intercepted at mail facility in Washington area

Atlantic

Ocean

DELAWARE

0

55

D.C.

KM

MURAT YÜKSELIR AND JOHN SOPINSKI / THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE:

TILEZEN; OPENSTREETMAP CONTRIBUTORS; HIU; NEW YORK TIMES; CNN

Thursday:

Package addressed to Maxine Waters intercepted at a mail facility in Los Angeles

CANADA

U.S.

Calif.

Fla.

Gulf of

Mexico

MEXICO

0

500

KM

Wednesday:

Suspicious packages found addressed to Eric Holder at Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz’s offices in Sunrise

 

Friday:

Package found addressed to New Jersey Democratic Senator Cory Booker

MURAT YÜKSELIR / THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE:

TILEZEN; OSM CONTRIBUTORS; HIU; WIRES

Thursday:

Package addressed to Maxine Waters intercepted at a mail facility in Los Angeles

CANADA

U.S.

Calif.

Fla.

Gulf of

Mexico

MEXICO

0

500

CUBA

KM

Wednesday:

Suspicious packages found addressed to Eric Holder at Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz’s offices in Sunrise

 

Friday:

Package found addressed to New Jersey Democratic Senator Cory Booker

MURAT YÜKSELIR / THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: TILEZEN;

OPENSTREETMAP CONTRIBUTORS; HIU; WIRES

CANADA

Thursday:

Package addressed to Maxine Waters intercepted at a mail facility in Los Angeles

Wednesday:

Suspicious packages found addressed to Eric Holder at Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz’s offices in Sunrise

U.S.

Calif.

Fla.

MEXICO

Gulf of

Mexico

Friday:

Package found addressed to New Jersey Democratic Senator Cory Booker

0

500

KM

MURAT YÜKSELIR / THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: TILEZEN; OPENSTREETMAP

CONTRIBUTORS; HIU; WIRES


What we know about the packages

Packaging: The parcels each consisted of a manila envelope with a bubble-wrap interior containing “potentially destructive devices,” the FBI said. Each was affixed with a computer-printed address label and six “forever” postage stamps.

Return address: At least five of the manila envelopes listed Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz as the return address. This was how one of the packages, destined for former attorney-general Eric Holder, ended up at her office in Florida: Its delivery address was wrong and it was sent there instead.

Explosives: Investigators are treating the devices as “live” explosives, not a hoax, said James O’Neill, police commissioner of New York City, where two of the parcels have surfaced. The devices, each with a small battery, were made from PVC pipe about six inches long and covered with black tape, said a law enforcement official who viewed X-ray images and spoke on condition of anonymity with Associated Press. The pipe bombs were packed with powder and shards of glass.

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In this undated photo released by the Broward County Sheriff's office, Cesar Sayoc is seen in a booking photo, in Miami. Federal authorities took Sayoc, 56, of Aventura, Fla., into custody Friday, Oct. 26, 2018 in connection with the mail-bomb scare.

The Associated Press

The suspect

The man suspected of sending the parcel bombs to high-profile critics is 56-year old Cesar Sayoc of Aventura, Florida, who is a registered Republican in the state. He was taken into custody in the parking lot of an AutoZone store in Plantation, near Fort Lauderdale. Court records show that Mr. Sayoc has a history of arrests in Florida, including one case in which he was accused of making a bomb threat.

The head of the FBI Christopher Wray said investigators had fingerprints of Mr. Sayoc and had possible DNA collected from two explosive devices. Wray says they matched a fingerprint found on one of the packages that had been sent to Democrat Maxine Waters of California.

On Friday morning, Florida news organizations reported that the authorities had surrounded a white van with Trump stickers on it, and television news outlets later showed images of authorities hauling the van away on a truck underneath a tarp. But it remained unclear if the van belonged to Mr. Sayoc.

Justice Department officials revealed that a latent fingerprint found on one package helped them identify their suspect as Cesar Sayoc, 56, of Aventura, Florida. Court records show Sayoc, an amateur body builder with social media accounts that denigrate Democrats and praise Trump, has a history of arrests for theft, illegal steroids possession and a 2002 charge of making a bomb threat.

The targets

The thread connecting all the bombs' targets was clear: All are either Democrats, frequent recipients of Mr. Trump’s ire, the subject of conspiracy theories or some combination of all three. Here are the details of where and when the bombs were discovered.

An aerial view of residences and buildings on the compound property of George Soros, a Hungarian-American billionaire whose donations to liberal causes have made him a target of far-right extremists in Europe and around the world. The bomb sent to his home was the first of many to be discovered targeting Democrats and critics of the Trump administration.

The Canadian Press

George Soros

Where the package was sent: A property owned by Mr. Soros in Katonah, N.Y.

When and where it was intercepted: An employee at the home opened the package at 3:45 p.m. (ET) Monday and found what appeared to be an explosive device, the Bedford Police Department said. A bomb squad took it to a nearby wooded area to detonate it.

The Clintons

Where the package was sent: The Clintons' home in Chappaqua, N.Y.

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When and where it was intercepted: A facility in Westchester County late Tuesday, according to law-enforcement officials.

Where the Clintons were: Bill Clinton was at home when the package was intercepted, but Hillary Clinton was attending campaign events for Democrats in Florida on Tuesday and Wednesday.

The Obamas

Where the package was sent: Washington, where former Democratic president Barack Obama lives in the tony neighbourhood of Kalorama Heights.

When and where it was intercepted: A routine mail screening by Secret Service agents found the package on Wedesday morning.

Joe Biden

Where the package was sent: Former vice-president Joe Biden had a house in the Delaware area, his home state, and law enforcement launched a search to find another suspicious parcel they thought might have been sent there.

When and where it was intercepted: Investigators tracked the packages to two Delaware mail-sorting facilities in New Castle and Wilmington, the FBI confirmed Thursday.

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John Brennan and CNN

Where the package was sent: On Wednesday, CNN received a suspicious package at its New York office, the Time Warner Center in Manhattan. It was addressed to former CIA director John Brennan, a CNN contributor who has often clashed with the Trump administration on foreign policy.

When and where it was intercepted: CNN evacuated its building Wednesday morning after the suspicious package was found in the mailroom, CNN president Jeff Zucker said in a note to staff.

Eric Holder and Debbie Wasserman Schultz

Where it was sent: This package was destined for Mr. Obama’s former attorney-general Eric Holder, but the FBI said it was sent to the wrong address and got rerouted to the listed return address. That was the office building in Sunrise, Fla., where Democratic Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz works.

When it was intercepted: Police arrived at the office and evacuated the building as a precaution on Wednesday morning.

Where she was: Ms. Wasserman Schultz was in Coral Gables, Fla., on Wednesday for a Democratic campaign event that Ms. Clinton was also attending.

Maxine Waters

Where they was sent: Two packages were dispatched to Maxine Waters, a California Democrat in the House of Representatives, the FBI announced Wednesday afternoon. One was sent to her Washington office, though it was not clear where the other one was headed.

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Where they were intercepted: At facilities in California and Washington, according to the FBI.

Robert De Niro

Where it was sent: Security officials at Robert De Niro’s production company found another suspicious package at 5 a.m. (ET) Thursday morning at their office in Lower Manhattan’s TriBeCa neighbourhood.

Where it was intercepted: A New York police bomb squad came to the office and took it away to a range in the Bronx to dispose of it.

Cory Booker

Where it was sent: The FBI announced Friday that another suspicious package had been addressed to Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey.

Where it was intercepted: The package was recovered in Florida, where authorities had concentrated their investigation to track the packages to their source.

James Clapper

Where it was sent: CNN reported that the package was addressed to James Clapper, a former U.S. director of national intelligence, and CNN, where he was a contributor to the network.

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Where it was intercepted: Postal workers discovered the package at a Manhattan sorting office Friday morning, then called police. Authorities evacuated the post office and the bomb squad was deployed.

Kamala Harris

Where it was sent: CNN reported Friday that a packaged addressed to Democratic Senator Kamala Harris was found in Sacramento, California. Her office was informed of the package.

Where it was intercepted: A trained postal employee identified the package at a mail facility in Sacramento, California, and reported it to authorities.

Tom Steyer

Where it was sent: A suspicious package was sent to Californian billionaire Tom Steyer, a Democrat known for his ads calling for the impeachment of Republican President Donald Trump, CNN reported on Friday.

Where it was intercepted: The package was discovered in Burlingame, California.


The GOP reaction

Top-ranking GOP officials condemned the wave of attacks on Democrats and their allies, and Mr. Trump pleaded for “all sides to come together in peace and harmony” at a campaign event in Wisconsin on Wednesday. But he also called on the media to end its “hostility,” and in a Thursday-morning tweet repeated past accusations that “fake news” was to blame for a worsening political climate in the country.

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GOP House Speaker Paul Ryan also tweeted a denunciation of the attacks, thanking law enforcement:

Louisiana Representative Steve Scalise, the No. 3 Republican in the House, said “this is a dangerous path and it cannot become the new normal.” Mr. Scalise survived life-threatening injuries after he was shot at a congressional baseball practice in 2017.


The targets’ reaction

The Clintons: “We are fine,” Ms. Clinton said at a Wednesday campaign event in Coral Gables, Fla., where she was supporting a candidate in the midterm elections. She and her husband each thanked the Secret Service and other law-enforcement agencies for their diligence. " Every day, we are grateful for their service and commitment. And obviously, never more than today," Ms. Clinton said. “But it is a troubling time, isn’t it?”

John Brennan: Speaking at an Austin event Wednesday night, Mr. Brennan said he’d “been contacted by folks in the security realm” who were investigating the explosives. He didn’t elaborate. “If I and others are being targeted because we’re speaking out” it’s “a very unfortunate turn of events,” the former CIA director said, adding that “Donald Trump too often has helped to incite these acts of violence” but “I’m hoping that maybe this is a turning point.”

James Clapper: The devices sent to Trump critics were “definitely domestic terrorism,” the former national intelligence director told CNN Friday morning, adding that he was not surprised he was among the targets. Mr. Clapper stressed that he did not want to suggest any direct link between Mr. Trump’s past rhetoric and the packages. But he said Mr. Trump should bear responsibility for the “coarseness and uncivility of the dialogue in this country.”


Commentary and analysis

Jared Yates Sexton: Make America hate again: When political rhetoric turns violent



Compiled by Globe staff

With reports from Associated Press, Reuters and Globe staff

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