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Members of the Oromo Ethiopian community in Lebanon take part in a demonstration to protest the death of musician and activist Haacaaluu Hundeessaa, in the capital Beirut on July 5, 2020.

ANWAR AMRO/AFP/Getty Images

The number of people killed in protests in Ethiopia after the slaying of a popular singer has jumped to 156 from the initial tally of 80, a senior regional security official told Reuters on Sunday.

The protests were sparked by the assassination of musician Haacaaluu Hundeessaa on Monday night and spread from Addis Ababa to the surrounding Oromia region.

Jibril Mohammed, head of the Oromia Security and Peace Bureau, said the 156 are those who died just in the Oromia region, which was the worst hit by the protests.

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He said more deaths might be reported owing to the number of injuries being treated in hospitals. About 145 of the casualties are civilians while 11 are security staff, he added.

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