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In this Oct. 29, 2017 file photo, a woman holds a banner that reads 'Rape Culture' during a demonstration in Lyon, France, to support a wave of testimonies denouncing cases of sexual harassment.

Laurent Cipriani/The Canadian Press

France voted to outlaw sexual harassment on the streets, leaving cat-callers and aggressively lecherous individuals facing potential on-the-spot fines of up to €750 as part of tougher legislation to fight sexual violence.

Lawmakers approved the law in a second reading late on Wednesday, days after outrage erupted in France after a man attacked a young woman, Marie Laguerre, when she responded to lewd noises he made at her outside a Paris cafe.

“Harassment in the street has previously not been punished. From now on, it will be,” Marlene Schiappa, Gender Equality Minister and architect of the new legislation, told Europe 1 radio on Thursday.

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Laguerre says the new law isn’t enough to stop offensive comments and behaviour.

Laguerre said in an interview with The Associated Press on Thursday that she has received messages of thanks from women and men after she posted a video of a man, who had made obscene noises, slapping her after she told him to shut up.

Laguerre says police would need to be everywhere and to recognize infractions for the law to be effective. She thinks education is “key to change the mentality.”

Marie Laguerre, who posted a video in which she is hit by a man in the street, poses in Paris on Wednesday.

ALAIN JOCARD/Getty Images

An early draft of the bill had said that minors under 15 would be assumed not to have given consent to sex with an older person. But the new law states that sex between an adult and a person of 15 or under can be considered rape if the younger party was judged not competent to give consent.

France’s highest legal authority, the Conseil d’État, had advised that the previous version could be ruled unconstitutional.

The legislation will also give underage victims of rape an extra 10 years to file complaints, extending the deadline to 30 years from when they turn 18.

Some critics say the harassment measures will mark an end to French romance. Schiappa last year told Reuters the government was not looking to stamp out flirtatious behavior and “kill the culture of the ‘French lover.’”

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“What’s key is ... that the laws of the French republic forbid insulting, intimidating, threatening and following women in public spaces,” Schiappa said on Thursday.

Schiappa said France needed to stop tolerating sexual harassment and violence like the attack on Laguerre last week.

Laguerre has received praise from the French public and abroad for her courage in standing up to her aggressor. She has created a website Nous Toutes Harcèlement (We Are All Harassed) for other victims of sexual harassment to recount their stories.

With files from The Associated Press

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