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World From the comments: ‘Bad day for British democracy.’ What readers are saying about Theresa May’s crushing Brexit defeat

Today, readers are talking about chaos in the UK after Members of Parliament soundly rejected a Brexit deal with the European Union. Readers are also discussing news that the Ontario government is expected to cut tuition fees by 10 per cent, and a column questioning the leadership abilities of NDP leader Jagmeet Singh.

People walk past a pro-Brexit protester outside the Houses of Parliament, after Prime Minister Theresa May's Brexit deal was rejected, in London, Britain, January 16, 2019.

HENRY NICHOLLS/Reuters

The UK may never recover from this tremendous stupidity called Brexit. The EU watches with concealed glee and historic antipathy as the UK shoots itself in its foot as thousands of businesses flee to relocate their offices and employees to the continent and billions of pounds leave with them, irreparably weakening the UK. The pro-Brexiters should have been careful for what they wished for. - Trophyman

In response to Trophyman:

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Britain signed up for a free trade agreement, which has gradually morphed, thanks to the Eurocrats glee, into a United States of Europe project. The whole project is nonsense - as any Spaniard under the age of 30 will tell you. The European Union is a monetary union without fiscal union - which has never worked in human history. The EU banks are all insolvent if debt issued by Greece, Portugal, Italy cannot be repaid. The Brits are smart enough to realize that the water is getting too hot and get out of there. The rest of Europe is still the frog in the water, and will likely stay there until it is too late. - Panaguy1

Bad day for British democracy. No matter how one feels about Brexit, Parliament is attempting to thwart the will of the majority who voted in favour of taking the country out of the European Union. - sanctimonious

In response to sanctimonious:

The referendum vote was based solely on the concept of leaving EU and not on actual proposal or plan for leaving. Parliament was presented with a plan and cast their votes on what they thought about it. In a representative democracy, they have fulfilled their roles. If they had done nothing and no plan or proposal had come to them, then they would have been irresponsible.

The referendum result gave a direction but the MP's have the responsibility of working out the details on how to get there. If they don't think the plan is appropriate, then they should have done what occurred today by defeating the plan. The best thing May could do is take her plan to the people in a second vote. - J. K. Galbraith

Catch up on yesterday’s From the Comments: 'This is Canada’s Rip Van Winkle story.’ Readers respond to China warning citizens about travel to Canada

The UK needs to respect the will of the people and move forward with a hard Brexit or democracy means nothing. The UK may suffer for a generation, but will be better off leaving the EU before the EU debt grows larger and blows up. History has proven that citizens who work hard and temporarily suffer so their children may prosper are rewarded like South Korea. - Very Proud Canadian

What else readers are discussing today:

Ontario government expected to cut tuition fees for Canadian students by 10 per cent

Anything that reduces the costs for post-secondary students should be welcomed! Universities and colleges have become bloated bureaucracies. Far too many well-paid administrators, and not enough spent on teachers and researchers. Students have been ripped off for years. This new policy will force tough decisions. - WisenWild

In response to WisenWild:

Do you really believe it will be the bloated administration that is cut? As usual, it will be the front line, the researchers and teachers you speak of, that are axed. - ebola1

This will hurt post-secondary education and do nothing to reduce provincial deficit. It will benefit most those people who can afford tuition the most. - Smacshack

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The uncomfortable truth about Jagmeet Singh’s political future, a column by Gary Mason

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh places a sign on a supporter's lawn while door knocking for his by-election campaign, in Burnaby, B.C., on Saturday January 12, 2019.

DARRYL DYCK/The Canadian Press

The NDP will regret dumping Tom Mulcair when this year's election results come in regardless of whether Jagmeet Singh wins a seat. - Bender111

I think Gary Mason says it all. Mr. Singh may have been a popular leadership candidate, but he's no leader. To not know about China's white supremacy jibe is inexcusable in a political leader. Even though he's busy with the campaign, surely he can take time out to watch The National or read The Globe over breakfast. - Ambrose99

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Trudeau's greatest assets in winning the next Federal election are Jagmeet Singh and Andrew Scheer. Never has a PM - of any party - had such weak opposition. - Life in Brandon

It's difficult to see a successful road forward for Singh and the NDP. If he loses the by-election, he's toast - no cred to lead the party into October. Even if he wins, he's going to need more than a springboard effect from that win - more like a catapult - to propel him into the public consciousness in a substantive, vote drawing way.

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Neither Trudeau nor Scheer has been outstanding, so the opportunity has been there for Singh to stand tall in comparison to them - he hasn't seized the opportunity. He hasn't been interesting, compelling, provocative - he's been, well, pretty much nothing outside of NDP circles.

Maybe an issue will arise that resonates deeply and broadly with many Canadians, one that Singh can make his own, one that distinguishes him clearly from the other guys and shows him to be capable of national leadership. Maybe. But at this point it certainly isn’t apparent. - Drew BC

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Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

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