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In this file photo taken on April 16, 2018, people leave the church of St. Francis in Valletta after the Archbishop of Malta celebrated mass in memory of journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia on the sixth-month anniversary of her death.

MATTHEW MIRABELLI/AFP/Getty Images

Malta police arrested one of the country’s most prominent businessmen on Wednesday as part of an investigation into the murder of journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia, two sources said.

Yorgen Fenech was detained as he tried to leave the Mediterranean island before dawn aboard his luxury yacht, sources with knowledge of the matter said.

Prime Minister Joseph Muscat confirmed Mr. Fenech’s arrest, but declined to say on what grounds he had been detained.

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The arrest came a day after Mr. Muscat offered to pardon a suspected middleman in the murder of Ms. Caruana Galizia if he provided legally binding evidence of who was behind the killing.

Mr. Muscat told reporters he had ordered additional police surveillance after news of the alleged go-between emerged.

“Had I not done that, today we might be talking of a person or persons of interest having potentially escaped,” he said.

Mr. Fenech’s lawyer was contacted for comment but has so far issued no statement. Under Maltese law, the police have 48 hours to interrogate and charge him or release him.

Ms. Caruana Galizia, an eminent anti-corruption journalist, was killed by a car bomb near the Maltese capital Valletta in October, 2017 – a murder that shocked Europe and raised questions about the rule of law on the small island.

Eight months before her death, she wrote about a mysterious company in Dubai called 17 Black Ltd., alleging it was connected to Maltese politicians, but offered no evidence.

A Reuters investigation last year revealed that Mr. Fenech was the owner of the firm.

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PAYMENTS

According to a December, 2015, e-mail, uncovered by Maltese financial regulators, secret Panama companies owned by then-Energy Minister Konrad Mizzi and Mr. Muscat’s chief of staff, Keith Schembri, stood to receive payments of up to $2-million from 17 Black for unspecified services.

Mr. Schembri and Mr. Mizzi both said last October they had no knowledge of any connection between 17 Black and Mr. Fenech. Mr. Fenech denied making any plans to pay any politician or any person or entity connected to them.

There is no evidence the payments went ahead.

Mr. Muscat said on Wednesday there was no indication that either Mr. Schembri or Mr. Mizzi, who now serves as tourism minister, were involved in the murder.

“The country’s institutions work, they work well,” he said, referring to the continuing investigation.

Three men suspected of being Ms. Caruana Galizia’s killers were arrested in December, 2017, but the authorities have struggled to determine who commissioned the murder.

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In a potentially major step forward in the probe, a man arrested last week as part of a separate investigation asked to see police dealing with the Caruana Galizia case and offered to provide the name of the mastermind in return for a pardon.

Mr. Fenech is a director and co-owner of a business group that won a large energy concession in 2013 from the Maltese state to build a gas power station on the island.

His luxury yacht Gio left the Portomaso marina, eight kilometres north of Valletta, shortly after 5.00 a.m. However, police swiftly intervened and forced it to return to port, the sources said.

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