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A woman prepares a placard out of crossed out portraits of Myanmar's junta chief Senior General Min Aung Hlaing during protest against the military coup in Myanmar, in Jakarta, Indonesia, April 24, 2021.

ANTARA FOTO/Reuters

Myanmar’s pro-democracy activists sharply criticized an agreement between the country’s junta chief and Southeast Asian leaders to end a violent post-coup crisis and vowed on Sunday to continue protesting.

Some scattered protests took place in Myanmar’s big cities on Sunday, a day after the meeting of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) with Senior General Min Aung Hlaing in Indonesia reached a consensus to end the turmoil in Myanmar, but gave no timeline.

“Whether it is ASEAN or the UN, they will only speak from outside saying ‘don’t fight but negotiate and solve the issues.’ But that doesn’t reflect Myanmar’s ground situation,” said Khin Sandar, from a protest group called the General Strikes Collaboration Committee.

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“We will continue the protests,” she told Reuters by phone.

According to a statement from ASEAN chair Brunei, a consensus was reached in Indonesia’s capital Jakarta on five points - ending violence, constructive dialogue among all parties, a special ASEAN envoy, acceptance of aid and a visit by the envoy to Myanmar.

The five-point consensus did not mention political prisoners, although the statement said the meeting heard calls for their release.

A draft statement circulating the day before the summit included the release of political prisoners as a consensus point, three sources familiar with the document said. But in the final statement, the language on political prisoners was unexpectedly watered down, they added.

As Saturday’s statement was issued in Jakarta, at least three soldiers were killed and several injured in an armed clash with a local militia in the town of Mindat in western Myanmar, the Chin state Human Rights Organization said.

The militia, armed with hunting rifles, attacked the troops after several protesters were arrested, it said.

ASEAN leaders had wanted a commitment from Gen. Min Aung Hlaing to restrain his security forces, which the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (AAPP) says have killed 748 people since a civil disobedience movement erupted to challenge his Feb. 1 coup against the elected government of Aung San Suu Kyi.

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AAPP, a Myanmar activist group, says more than 3,300 are in detention.

“We realized that whatever the outcome from the ASEAN meeting, it will not reflect what people want,” said Wai Aung, a protest organizer in Yangon. “We will keep up protests and strikes till the military regime completely fails.”

SLAP ON THE FACE

Several people took to social media to criticize the deal.

“ASEAN’s statement is a slap on the face of the people who have been abused, killed and terrorized by the military,” a Facebook user called Mawchi Tun said. “We do not need your help with that mindset and approach.”

Aaron Htwe, another Facebook user, wrote: “Who will pay the price for the over 700 innocent lives?”

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Phil Robertson, deputy Asia director of Human Rights Watch, said it was unfortunate that only the junta chief represented Myanmar at the meeting.

“Not only were the representatives of the Myanmar people not invited to the Jakarta meeting but they also got left out of the consensus that ASEAN is now patting itself on the back for reaching,” he said in a statement.

“The lack of a clear timeline for action, and ASEAN’s well known weakness in implementing the decisions and plans that it issues, are real concerns that no one should overlook.”

The ASEAN gathering was the first co-ordinated international effort to ease the crisis in Myanmar, an impoverished country that neighbours China, India and Thailand and has been in turmoil since the coup. Besides the protests, deaths and arrests, a nationwide strike has crippled economic activity.

Myanmar’s parallel National Unity Government (NUG), comprised of pro-democracy figures, remnants of Ms. Suu Kyi’s ousted administration and representatives of armed ethnic groups, said it welcomed the consensus reached but added the junta had to be held to its promises.

“We look forward to firm action by ASEAN to follow up its decisions and to restore our democracy,” said Dr. Sasa, spokesman for the NUG.

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Besides the junta chief, the leaders of Indonesia, Vietnam, Singapore, Malaysia, Cambodia and Brunei were at the meeting, along with the foreign ministers of Laos, Thailand and the Philippines. The NUG was not invited but spoke privately to some of the participating countries before the meeting.

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