Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Support Quality Journalism
The Globe and Mail
First Access to Latest
Investment News
Collection of curated
e-books and guides
Inform your decisions via
Globe Investor Tools
Just$1.99
per week
for first 24 weeks

Enjoy unlimited digital access
Enjoy Unlimited Digital Access
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){window.requestAnimationFrame(function() {var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))});}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1); // via darwin-bg var slideIndex = 0; carousel(); function carousel() { var i; var x = document.getElementsByClassName("subs_valueprop"); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } slideIndex++; if (slideIndex> x.length) { slideIndex = 1; } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; setTimeout(carousel, 2500); }

Ethiopian soldiers watch a protest in the Oromia region of Ethiopia on Oct. 2, 2016.

The Associated Press

A new report by the rights group Amnesty International accuses Ethiopia’s security forces of extrajudicial killings and mass detentions even as the country’s reformist prime minister was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

The report issued Friday says security forces killed at least 25 people in 2019 in the East Guji and West Guji zones of the restive Oromia region amid suspicions of support for a rebel group, the Oromo Liberation Army, and a once-exiled opposition group. And at least 10,000 people under suspicion were detained between January and September, with most “subjected to brutal beatings.”

The government of Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, who was awarded the Nobel in December for sweeping political reforms and restoring ties with neighbouring Eritrea after two decades of hostilities, did not comment on the report, which comes amid concerns that some repressive measures have returned.

Story continues below advertisement

Tensions among some of Ethiopia’s more than 80 ethnic groups have risen, along with some calls for more autonomy, and the new report also documents some of the intercommunal violence in the Oromia and Amhara regions, the country’s most populous.

Such violence is a concern as the country faces a crucial national election, now delayed because of the coronavirus, that will be a measure of support for the country’s changes since Mr. Abiy took office in early 2018.

With no election date set and mandates for the executive and regional and federal legislatures ending in October, political parties are disagreeing on strategies for how to avoid a potential constitutional crisis.

Amnesty acknowledged that Ethiopian authorities have made notable progress in changing the country’s bleak human rights record. But “with elections on the horizon, these violations and abuses could escalate out of control unless the government takes urgent measures to ensure security forces act within the law,” said Deprose Muchena, the group’s director for East and Southern Africa, adding that “authorities must also recognize that holding diverse political views and opinions is legal.”

The new report blames a range of actors for the violence during 2019 including regional police special forces, local administration officials and armed youth and vigilante groups. The rights group noted that in the new, wider political space some politicians have been “stirring up ethnic and religious animosities,” sparking violence in five of the country’s nine regional states.

“The research finds a horrendously botched security operation at work in Amhara and Oromia regions characterized by impunity that is difficult to imagine in present-day Ethiopia,” Amnesty said. Former detainees told the rights group about multiple cases of arbitrary arrest and detention of family members, including children, when security officials couldn’t find the person they sought to arrest.

In the Oromia region, the government in January, 2019, launched a law enforcement offensive against the Oromo Liberation Army, which had staged armed attacks in the region. The armed group broke away from the political wing of the once-exiled Oromo Liberation Front, which under Ethiopia’s reforms returned to the country to pursue a peaceful political agenda.

Story continues below advertisement

In the Amhara region, “at least 150 people were killed in intercommunal conflict in which the security forces were complicit,” the report said, noting that at least 58 ethnic Qimant, who seek more autonomy, were killed within 24 hours in January, 2019. “The attacks and counterattacks led to internal displacement of thousands of ethnic Amhara and Qimant people.”

The deputy head of the Amhara Regional Peace and Security Bureau told the rights group that more deaths could have occurred if the security forces had not been deployed and rejected the claim that security forces were complicit in some of the attacks.

Several other government offices did not respond to the report, Amnesty said.

Two opposition groups reacted to the new report with further allegations.

“The report covers the period up to the end of 2019. However, the situation in the Oromia region specifically has gotten progressively worse in 2020 with a substantial rise in mass incarcerations, extrajudicial killings and destruction of property in provinces that were not previously affected,” said a joint statement issued by the Oromo Liberation Front and Oromo Federalist Congress.

“The report is further proof that the new administration has not parted ways with the practice of forcefully stifling dissent.”

Story continues below advertisement

Our Morning Update and Evening Update newsletters are written by Globe editors, giving you a concise summary of the day’s most important headlines. Sign up today.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies