Skip to main content

Cantor Yoely Greenfeld, brother of shooting victim Mindy Ferencz, lights a menorah during a ceremony in front of the JC Kosher supermarket in Jersey City, N.J., Dec. 22, 2019. Emotional residents gathered Sunday for a menorah lighting ceremony at the kosher market where three people died in an anti-Semitic attack.

Bryan Anselm/The New York Times News Service

New Jersey Democratic Gov. Phil Murphy signed legislation Wednesday expanding the definition of terrorism under state law in response to last month’s fatal attack on a kosher market in Jersey City.

Murphy said the new law will make it clear that New Jersey is committed to the elimination of “hate in all its forms.” The legislation passed unanimously in the Democrat-led Legislature on Monday, about a month after the attack that left a Jersey City police detective dead, along with three people inside the market.

Authorities have said that the attackers, David Anderson and Francine Graham, who both died in a gunfight with police, had expressed hatred of Jews and law enforcement.

Story continues below advertisement

“This legislation is crucial to making it clear that hatred will not be tolerated in our state,” Murphy said in a statement.

The new law says terrorism includes crimes aimed at inciting terror against people based on their religion, race or national origin, among other factors.

Previous law said someone was guilty of terrorism if the person committed crimes aimed at promoting terror, terrorizing five or more people, influencing government policy through terror or impairing public transportation, communication, or other public services.

Murphy also signed a bill that sets aside $1 million for security grants for nonprofits. Murphy said the money would be open to non-profit organizations across the state that face the “greatest risk of terrorist attacks.”

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter
To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies