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World North Korea tests new ‘super-large’ multiple rocket launcher

This Saturday, Aug. 24, 2019, photo provided Sunday, Aug. 25, by the North Korean government, shows North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, center, claps hands as Kim watches the test firing of an unspecified missile at an undisclosed location in North Korea. The content of this image is as provided and cannot be independently verified.

The Canadian Press

North Korea said Sunday leader Kim Jong Un supervised the test-firing of a “newly developed super-large multiple rocket launcher,” another demonstration of its expanding weapons arsenal apparently aimed at increasing its leverage ahead of a possible resumption of nuclear talks with the U.S.

The North’s Korean Central News Agency said Saturday’s weapons test was successful and cited Kim as saying the rocket launcher is “indeed a great weapon.”

Kim underscored the need to “continue to step up the development of Korean-style strategic and tactical weapons for resolutely frustrating the ever-mounting military threats and pressure offensive of the hostile forces,” according to the KCNA.

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The “hostile forces” likely referred to the United States and South Korea, whose recently ended regular military drills infuriated North Korea. The North has called the drills an invasion rehearsal and conducted a slew of missile and rocket tests in response.

Some experts said North Korea aims to show off its weapons to try to increase its leverage ahead of a possible restart of nuclear negotiations, which remain largely stalemated since the second summit between President Donald Trump and Kim in Vietnam in February fell apart due to squabbling over U.S.-led sanctions on North Korea. The two leaders met again at the Korean border in late June and agreed to resume talks.

Trump downplayed the latest launch, saying “Kim Jong Un has been, you know, pretty straight with me. … He likes testing missiles but we never restricted short-range missiles. We’ll see what happens.”

South Korea’s military said North Korea fired two suspected short-range ballistic missiles off its east coast on Saturday morning and that they flew about 380 kilometres at the maximum altitude of 97 kilometres. It was the seventh known weapons test by North Korea in about a month.

North Korea has been pushing to develop powerful multiple rocket launch systems, whose projectiles resemble short-range missiles, some experts said. On Aug. 1, North Korea said it tested a large-calibre multiple rocket guided system, a day after South Korea said the North fired two short-range ballistic missiles.

Most of the North Korean weapons tested in recent weeks have shown short-range flight distances. This suggested North Korea still doesn’t intend to lift its self-imposed moratorium on nuclear and long-range missile tests, which would certainly derail the negotiations with Washington.

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