Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Support Quality Journalism
The Globe and Mail
First Access to Latest
Investment News
Collection of curated
e-books and guides
Inform your decisions via
Globe Investor Tools
Just$1.99
per week
for first 24 weeks

Enjoy unlimited digital access
Enjoy Unlimited Digital Access
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){window.requestAnimationFrame(function() {var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))});}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1); // via darwin-bg var slideIndex = 0; carousel(); function carousel() { var i; var x = document.getElementsByClassName("subs_valueprop"); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } slideIndex++; if (slideIndex> x.length) { slideIndex = 1; } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; setTimeout(carousel, 2500); }
Coronavirus information
Coronavirus information
The Zero Canada Project provides resources to help you make the most of staying home.
Visit the hub

Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a meeting via teleconference at the Novo-Ogaryovo residence, outside Moscow, Russia, on May 14, 2020.

Alexei Nikolsky/The Associated Press

President Vladimir Putin said on Thursday Russia’s education minister had caught the new coronavirus, making him at least the sixth senior official to be swept up in the pandemic that has officially infected more than 250,000 people nationwide.

But Anna Popova, a senior health official, said Russia had managed to stop the growth rate of infection after authorities reported a one-day rise in new coronavirus cases of fewer than 10,000 for the first time in almost two weeks.

Putin, speaking at a televised government meeting via video link, said it was “no secret” that Valery Falkov, 41, the minister of science and higher education, had tested positive and recovered, and asked him how he was feeling.

Story continues below advertisement

“Thank you Vladimir Vladimirovich, I’m better already and I’m actively back at work,” the minister replied.

Falkov is the fourth member of Putin’s government known to have caught the coronavirus, including Prime Minister Mikhail Mishustin who is still recovering, but has remotely attended at least one government meeting by video conference.

Earlier this week, the Kremlin’s veteran spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, said he had also fallen ill with the coronavirus and contracted double pneumonia.

The Kremlin has said the health of Putin, 67, is carefully guarded and most of his recent public appearances have been at government meetings via video link from a room at his residence outside Moscow.

Moscow and much of the country are in their seventh week of a lockdown, but factory and construction workers have gone back to work after Putin said on Monday that a gradual easing of the restrictions was feasible.

On Thursday, Russia’s official coronavirus case tally passed the 250,000 mark after 9,974 new cases were recorded in the last 24 hours, the lowest one-day rise in almost two weeks.

“I would say that today we have halted growth,” Popova said in the preview of a video interview due to be aired on Sunday on the Rossiya-1 television channel.

Story continues below advertisement

At 252,245, the case total is the second highest in the world after the United States, although authorities say the high figure shows how thoroughly officials are testing people.

Ninety-three people died overnight, pushing the death toll to 2,305, a level that is well below many countries and has prompted the Kremlin’s critics to cast doubt on the accuracy of the figure. Officials deny any data manipulation.

Moscow’s mayor, Sergei Sobyanin, said on Thursday that authorities would begin free mass testing of residents from Friday and that they aimed to be testing 100,000 people a day by the end of the month.

Moscow has begun investigating the safety of a Russian-made medical ventilator, some of which have been sent to the United States though not used, after six people died in hospital fires reported to involve two such machines. Emer McCarthy reports. Reuters

Sign up for the Coronavirus Update newsletter to read the day’s essential coronavirus news, features and explainers written by Globe reporters and editors.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies