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  • King Charles III, left, watches as The Lord Chamberlain Baron Parker breaks his Wand of Office, marking the end of his service to the sovereign, during a committal service for Queen Elizabeth.Joe Giddens/The Associated Press

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The state funeral of Queen Elizabeth, the longest-reigning British monarch, has ended. Her coffin made its final journey to Windsor Castle for the committal service and burial. She was laid to rest alongside her late husband Prince Philip in a private burial service at at St George’s Chapel. Follow for the latest updates.

Latest updates



3:10 p.m.

‘Focused, dutiful, calm’: Adrienne Clarkson’s tribute to Queen Elizabeth from Ottawa

The Rt. Hon. Adrienne Clarkson, 26th Governor-General of Canada, at the national commemorative ceremony for Queen Elizabeth II on Sept. 19, gave an address at Christ Church Cathedral in Ottawa.

Former Canada's governor general Adrienne Clarkson speaks from the pulpit during commemorative ceremonies for Queen Elizabeth at Christ Church Cathedral, in Ottawa, Canada Monday, September 19, 2022. Adrian Wyld/Pool via REUTERSPOOL/Reuters

“One day in 1952, when I was in grade nine at Lisgar Collegiate Institute here in Ottawa, I went to assembly and the principal told us that the governor-general of Canada, Vincent Massey, was going to address us. The governor-general came out on stage and told us in gentle but solemn tones that the King had died and that we now had a Queen. Shakily, for the first time, we sang God Save the Queen. He then explained that Canada acknowledged the Queen as Sovereign and that the Crown in Canada was the basis of our constitutional democracy.

I had no idea then, having arrived nine years before at the age of three, a Chinese refugee from a defeated part of the British Empire called Hong Kong, that 48 years later I would occupy the office held then by Mr. Massey. But Canada is a remarkable place, an astonishing place. Things happen here, not just to me but to the millions of refugees and immigrants who come here.”

Read Ms. Clarkson’s full address.


3:05 p.m.

Adrienne Clarkson, Brian Mulroney remark on Queen’s strong connections to Canada

At the ceremony, former Governor General Adrienne Clarkson and former Prime Minister Brian Mulroney gave separate addresses, both marking the late Queen’s long reign and her strong connections to Canada.

Mr. Mulroney spoke of the Queen’s “discreet, brilliant and generous guidance” that assisted in ending Apartheid in South Africa; about her flawless command of the French language and her respect for bilingualism; and of her personality.

Former prime minister Brian Mulroney speaks from the pulpit during commemorative ceremonies for Queen Elizabeth at Christ Church Cathedral, in Ottawa, Monday, Sept.19, 2022.Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press

“She was extremely intelligent – a woman of impeccable judgment, resolute, selfless, witty, very witty, and kind,” he said.

The ceremony also featured many musical works, including a rendition of ‘O Canada’ by Kim Richardson, ‘Hallelujah’ by Rufus Wainwright, ‘Ceux qui s’en vont’ by Ginette Reno, and ‘Thank You For The Love You Gave’ by Tomson Highway, who was accompanied by Patricia Cano and Marcus Ali.

Soon after the ceremony concluded, it began pouring rain in downtown Ottawa.

Marsha McLeod


2:10 p.m.

The Queen to be reunited with Prince Philip and her parents in Windsor

Queen Elizabeth will be laid to rest in an intimate ceremony away from prying cameras in Windsor, where she will be reunited with her late husband and her parents.

King Charles III and senior royal family members will gather later Monday, approx. 7:30 p.m. local time, for the interment ceremony at St. George’s Chapel.

The chapel is the resting place of 10 former British monarchs, including Henry VIII and the beheaded Charles I. Elizabeth II’s parents, King George VI and Queen Elizabeth, were interred there along with the ashes of Princess Margaret, the late monarch’s younger sister who died in 2002.

The Queen’s final resting place is Windsor Castle, west of London, whose chapel is where her late husband, parents and many ancestors buried.

State

apartments

Round Tower: Houses Royal Archives

St. George’s Chapel:

Spiritual home of Order of the Garter, order of chivalry established by Edward III in 1348

Curfew

Tower

Private apartments

Buckingham

Palace

LONDON

King Henry

VIII Gate

Windsor

0

20

ST. GEORGE’S CHAPEL

Among finest examples of Gothic architecture in England. Construction begun by

Edward IV in 1475

and completed by

Henry VIII in 1528

KM

High Altar

Royal Vault:

Ten former

Sovereigns are buried

at St. George’s Chapel.

Nave

Tomb of George V and Queen Mary, Queen’s grandparents

Electric lift: Lowers funeral plinth into the Royal Vault

Quire: Tombs include Henry VIII and his third wife Jane Seymour, and Charles I, executed in 1649

KING GEORGE VI MEMORIAL CHAPEL

Small chapel with its own vault, added in 1969. First structural addition to exterior of St. George’s Chapel since 1528

King George VI

Dec. 14, 1895 –

Feb. 6, 1952

Queen Elizabeth

The Queen Mother

Aug. 4, 1900 –

March 30, 2002

Princess Margaret

Aug. 21, 1930 –

Feb. 9, 2002

Prince Philip,

Duke of Edinburgh

June 10, 1921 –

April 9, 2021

Black marble gravestone Inscribed in gold lettering with names of George VI and his wife, Elizabeth

graphic news, Sources: Windsor Castle, The Royal Family

State

apartments

Round Tower: Houses Royal Archives

St. George’s Chapel:

Spiritual home of Order of the Garter, order of chivalry established by Edward III in 1348

Curfew

Tower

Private apartments

Buckingham

Palace

LONDON

King Henry

VIII Gate

Windsor

0

20

ST. GEORGE’S CHAPEL

Among finest examples of Gothic architecture in England. Construction begun by

Edward IV in 1475

and completed by

Henry VIII in 1528

KM

High Altar

Royal Vault:

Ten former Sovereigns are buried at St. George’s Chapel.

Nave

Tomb of George V and Queen Mary, Queen’s grandparents

Electric lift: Lowers funeral plinth into the Royal Vault

Quire: Tombs include Henry VIII and his third wife Jane Seymour, and Charles I, executed in 1649

KING GEORGE VI MEMORIAL CHAPEL

Small chapel with its own vault, added in 1969. First structural addition to exterior of St. George’s Chapel since 1528

King George VI

Dec. 14, 1895 –

Feb. 6, 1952

Queen Elizabeth

The Queen Mother

Aug. 4, 1900 –

March 30, 2002

Princess Margaret

Aug. 21, 1930 –

Feb. 9, 2002

Prince Philip,

Duke of Edinburgh

June 10, 1921 –

April 9, 2021

Black marble gravestone Inscribed in gold lettering with names of George VI and his wife, Elizabeth

graphic news, Sources: Windsor Castle, The Royal Family

State apartments

Round Tower: Houses Royal Archives

St. George’s Chapel:

Spiritual home of Order of the Garter, order of chivalry established by Edward III in 1348

Curfew

Tower

Private apartments

Buckingham

Palace

LONDON

King Henry

VIII Gate

Windsor

0

20

KM

ST. GEORGE’S CHAPEL

Among finest examples of Gothic architecture in England. Construction begun by Edward IV in 1475 and completed by Henry VIII in 1528

Royal Vault:

Ten former Sovereigns are buried at St. George’s Chapel. Kings George III (d.1820), George IV (d.1830); William IV (d.1837) lie in Royal Vault. Prince Philip was temporarily laid to rest in Royal Vault in 2021. He will be relocated to George VI Memorial Chapel, to lie alongside his wife of 73 years

High Altar

Nave

Tomb of George V and Queen Mary, Queen’s grandparents

Electric lift: Lowers funeral plinth into the Royal Vault

Quire: Tombs include Henry VIII and his third wife Jane Seymour, and Charles I, executed in 1649

KING GEORGE VI MEMORIAL CHAPEL

Small chapel with its own vault, added in 1969. First structural addition to exterior of St. George’s Chapel since 1528

King George VI

Dec. 14, 1895 –

Feb. 6, 1952

Early death at age 56

made Elizabeth Queen

Queen Elizabeth

The Queen Mother

Aug. 4, 1900 –

March 30, 2002

Died at age 101

Princess Margaret

Aug. 21, 1930 –

Feb. 9, 2002

Ashes interred in chapel

Prince Philip,

Duke of Edinburgh

June 10, 1921 –

April 9, 2021

Black marble gravestone Inscribed in gold lettering with names of George VI and his wife, Elizabeth

graphic news, Sources: Windsor Castle, The Royal Family

The chapel is also the home of the Order of the Garter, an ancient order of chivalry founded by King Edward III in 1348.

The queen’s coffin will be interred together with Prince Philip’s remains at the King George VI memorial chapel, an annex within St. George’s. That event, which royal officials described as a “deeply personal family occasion,” will not be televised.

St. George’s and Windsor featured prominently throughout the queen’s life. The chapel was where she marked many a Christmas and Easter, and where she celebrated the weddings of three of her grandchildren: Prince Harry married Meghan Markle there in 2018, as did Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank. Peter Philips, the queen’s oldest grandchild, married Autumn Kelly there in 2008.

Queen Elizabeth (the then Princess Elizabeth), her mother Queen Elizabeth and father King George VI, in this still image taken from archive film footage.Reuters

The queen spent most of her weekends in Windsor, a quiet and more private retreat away from the bustle of Buckingham Palace in central London.

The castle — believed to be the largest occupied castle in the world — was also where young Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret were sent to live during World War II while their parents were busy with the war effort.

In recent years, the Queen made Windsor Castle her main residence, having moved there in early 2020 at the start of the coronavirus pandemic.

– The Associated Press


2:05 p.m.

In Ottawa, Reverend and Indigenous spiritual advisor pay tribute to Queen Elizabeth

The commemorative ceremony began with a memorial procession into the church, which included two Eagle Staff bearers from the CAF and RCMP, respectively, led by a bagpiper. The staffs represent and honour Indigenous peoples in Canada.

The Very Reverend Beth Bretzlaff, Dean of Christ Church Cathedral, opened the ceremony, before Albert Dumont, Algonquin spiritual teacher-in-residence at the cathedral, took over to give a short address.

“In the spiritual world, where the old are young again, the Queen and Duke rejoin,” said Mr. Dumont, who wore a brown jacket adorned with the design of several feathers, to which he’d pinned a black ribbon.

“The Queen is dead. In the lands of the red maple leaf, the sorrow of many citizens fills the skies. The tears, the prayers of her admirers take flight – like the geese of spring and autumn,” he continued. “The horrors committed against Indigenous Peoples of British-colonised lands by past monarchs will be spoken about around the council fire of the spirit land.”

Marsha McLeod


2 p.m.

How provinces across Canada are paying tribute to the Queen on Day of Mourning

Canada declared Monday a Day of Mourning to coincide with the funeral, and Ontario Premier Doug Ford encouraged people to observe a moment of silence at 1 p.m. “to reflect on the remarkable life and legacy of service” of the queen.

Ontario

In busy downtown Toronto, bells at Old City Hall began tolling at 1 p.m., with 96 tolls in total for each of the Commonwealth longest-serving monarch’s years of life.

About 50 people gathered nearby to observe a moment of silence at City Hall’s Peace Garden, which was dedicated to the late monarch during a 1984 visit. Toronto Mayor John Tory joined the small crowd of city councillors and members of the public. He put flowers on a stone sign that marked the queen’s visit to the city.

The CN Tower was also set to dim at the top of each hour Monday night in memory of the queen.

Toronto’s transit system was paused for 96 seconds after 1 p.m., a move replicated in the nearby cities of Mississauga and Oakville.

British Columbia

A ceremonial procession is underway in Victoria, with dignitaries and members of the Canadian armed forces making their way from the legislature to Christ Church Cathedral.

British Columbia Lt.-Gov. Janet Austin, Premier John Horgan and others are being led by a Royal Canadian Navy band and a 100-member guard of honour. A riderless horse, symbolizing a fallen comrade, is also part of the procession. The 1.4-kilometre march, which began with a 21-gun artillery salute, will be followed by a memorial service at the cathedral.

Prince Edward Island

The life of Queen Elizabeth is being commemorated at a provincial service at Charlottetown’s St. Peter’s Cathedral. The service followed a procession of dignitaries that included Lt.-Gov. Antoinette Perry and Premier Dennis King. The ceremony began with a Mi’kmaq drum tribute and song.

The service is to be followed by a 21-gun salute by the PEI Regiment from the battery at Victoria Park in Charlottetown.

Newfoundland and Labrador

A provincial service of commemoration for Queen Elizabeth is underway at the Anglican Cathedral of St. John the Baptist in St. John’s, N.L. The province’s Lieutenant-Governor Judy Foote and Premier Andrew Furey are among the dignitaries in attendance.

Following the ceremony, there is to be a 21-gun salute on the grounds of the Queen’s Battery in St. John’s.

– The Canadian Press


1:35 p.m.

Sandra Oh, Mark Tewksbury and Stephen Harper invested into Order of Canada in London

During the Queen’s funeral service, four Canadians – Olympian Mark Tewksbury, musician Gregory Charles, actor Sandra Oh and Cross of Valour recipient Leslie Palmer – participated in a procession of recipients of national honours.

Mr. Tewksbury told The Globe that his fondest memory of the Queen is from the 2012 London Olympics, sitting near the royal box during the opening ceremonies. “When she arrived, when you looked up, it was like a disco ball but it was her diamonds creating the sparkle all over the place.”

Sandra Oh, Mark Tewksbury and Stephen Harper were also invested into the Order of Canada during their time in London for the Queen’s funeral. Governor General Mary Simon invested the former PM in a private ceremony in London on Sunday afternoon while Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and former prime ministers Jean Chrétien, Paul Martin and Kim Campbell looked on.

– Globe staff


1:05 p.m.

‘I’ve never forgotten’: Globe readers share their experiences meeting the Queen

Helene Hamel, left, and her mother Louise Boyer Hamel look at a photo of The Queen that Louise took in 1951.Christinne Muschi/The Globe and Mail

During her 70-year reign, Queen Elizabeth visited all 10 provinces and three territories in Canada. Since 1970, those visits have included what’s become known as the “walkabout,” where the monarch wanders among tightly controlled crowds, to meet as many keen subjects as possible.

For many Canadians, the moment they met the Queen was brief – less than a second of her life – but it created a lasting memory for them.

Here are some of their stories.

– Caora McKenna


12:50 p.m.

Scenes from along the parade route in Ottawa

JoAnne Cramer, treasurer of the Ottawa branch of the monarchist league, and her husband Ray, were among those lining the memorial parade route. They had travelled from Brockville, Ont. to view the procession. Ms. Cramer had seen the Queen several times during the monarch’s official visits to Canada – the first time as a 10-year-old girl, sitting on her father’s shoulders to catch a glimpse in 1967 in Ottawa.

Dressed in black with a jubilee broach on her lapel, and with an umbrella in hand, Ms. Cramer said she had come to honour the Queen.

“She gave us many years of sacrificial service. She was a shining example,” Ms. Cramer said. “She was a person of integrity. I admired her. She was a head of state above the political fray. I think our system of government has served us very well.”

Among the crowd were a number of tourists who arrived in Ottawa to find Parliament Hill blocked off with barriers.

Quin Zhang from Boston, Mass. said the parade was a happy coincidence. “The Queen maintained her dignity and grace and elegance her whole life,” she said.

Michael Singoorvie, an Inuit and Mohawk spectator originally from north Baffin Island, was among those to have braved the drizzling rain to watch the procession. “I came to pay my respects. She was an elegant Queen,” he said. “She wasn’t directly involved in colonialism. She inherited it. She was the only Queen I have ever known.”

Marie Woolf


12:40 p.m.

In Ottawa, a memorial parade for Queen Elizabeth is underway

Mourners congregate inside the chapel prior commemorative ceremonies for Queen Elizabeth at Christ Church Cathedral, in Ottawa.Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press

It was cold and overcast in Ottawa on Monday, when the memorial parade for Queen Elizabeth began precisely on schedule at 12:10 p.m. It started from Cartier Square Drill Hall, before beginning the 2.2-kilometre route to Christ Church Cathedral, where a commemorative ceremony will take place.

Spectators sparsely lined the route, many with umbrellas and rain jackets. A bigger crowd congregated near the cathedral, watching ministers and other dignitaries filing in.

The parade was made up of RCMP and Canadian Armed Forces members, including the CAF’s Central Band. A mounted detachment of the RCMP’s Musical Ride – dressed in their distinctive red dress uniform, riding black horses – led the parade.

The parade wound past the National Arts Centre, which was illuminated with two formal photographs of Queen Elizabeth, underscored with the words: “a historic reign.”

Policing was low-key, with police on bikes patrolling the route in high-viz rain jackets, but a drone and security on rooftops were visible near the cathedral.

By 12:30, many of the 600 or so guests invited to the ceremony had already arrived at the cathedral, including Ontario premier Doug Ford, federal NDP leader Jagmeet Singh, deputy prime minister Chrystia Freeland, Chief Justice Richard Wagner, MPs and Cabinet members.

Marsha McLeod and Marie Woolf


12:10 p.m.

Ottawa’s commemorative flypast for the Queen cancelled due to weather

The Royal Canadian Air Force says the flypast planned for Ottawa’s commemoration ceremonies this afternoon is cancelled due to inclement weather.

The 96-gun salute will go ahead as planned at LeBreton Flats at about 12:25 p.m. ET. It will occur during a parade set to get underway in the city at 12:10 p.m. ET.

0

150

GATINEAU

m

Garden of the Provinces and Territories

Parliament

of Canada

Ottawa

River

Wellington St

Elgin St

OTTAWA

Queen St

Laurier Ave W

Christ Church Cathedral Ottawa

Start: 12:10 p.m.

Cartier Square Drill Hall

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: TILEZEN;

OPENSTREETMAP CONTRIBUTORS

0

150

GATINEAU

m

Garden of the Provinces and Territories

Parliament

of Canada

Confedration

Park

Ottawa

River

Wellington St

Elgin St

OTTAWA

Queen St

Laurier Ave W

Christ Church Cathedral Ottawa

Start: 12:10 p.m.

Cartier Square Drill Hall

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: TILEZEN;

OPENSTREETMAP CONTRIBUTORS

0

150

m

GATINEAU

Parliament

of Canada

Ottawa River

Confederation Park

Elgin St

Wellington St

Victoria

Island

OTTAWA

Garden of the Provinces and Territories

Laurier Ave W

Queen St

Start: 12:10 p.m.

Cartier Square Drill Hall

DOWNTOWN

Christ Church Cathedral Ottawa

CENTRETOWN

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: TILEZEN; OPENSTREETMAP CONTRIBUTORS

The march route will end at Christ Church Cathedral about 50 minutes later, when a commemorative service for the queen is set to take place.

– The Canadian Press


12:10 p.m.

Marsha Lederman: ‘The Queen’s committal service felt much more intimate’

The Queen’s committal service felt much more intimate than the Westminster Abbey service and it was mournful – watching the crown being removed from the coffin, and then that breaking of the staff. Seeing the coffin disappear down into the vault.

King Charles seemed to be on the emotional edge as the congregation sang God Save the King at the end of the service, the final public event marking her death. But then as he left, he was more animated as he shook hands and thanked church officials. He even appeared to be laughing slightly for a moment. That’s his job, I guess. Does he feel compelled to turn it on? It must be a lot.

There will be a private burial later for the family, when they can be themselves – whatever that is.

Meanwhile here in Vancouver, where I live across the street from a school, the school bell rang at 9 am, but it’s all quiet in the schoolyard. The children are being kept home today, to mark this occasion.

– Marsha Lederman


12 p.m.

The Queen’s coffin is lowered into the Royal Vault

Queen Elizabeth II’s coffin has been lowered into the Royal Vault at St. George’s Chapel, in Windsor Castle, at the conclusion of her committal service.

The Lord Chamberlain, the most senior official in the British royal household, broke a rod known as the “wand of office” as the Royal Family and hundreds of mourners bid a final farewell to the late monarch.

Andrew Parker, who is the former head of Britain’s domestic secret service MI5, broke the white rod and placed it on the queen’s coffin. The ritual symbolizes the end of his service to the monarch.

King Charles III places the Queen's Company Camp Colour of the Grenadier Guards on the coffin at the Committal Service for Queen Elizabeth.Jonathan Brady/The Associated Press

Earlier David Conner, the Dean of Windsor, paid tribute to the queen, telling 800 mourners gathered at the chapel about the queen as “someone whose uncomplicated yet profound Christian faith bore so much fruit.”

He said: “In the midst of our rapidly changing and frequently troubled world, her calm and dignified presence has given us confidence to face the future, as she did, with courage and with hope.”

– The Associated Press


11:55 a.m.

The Queen’s committal service had been planned for years

The order of service for Queen Elizabeth II’s committal service at Windsor Castle was planned by the late monarch for many years.

She chose all the hymns except for the very last one, which was selected by her son and heir King Charles III.

Most of the music played during the service was composed by Sir William Harris, who was an organist at the chapel for much of the queen’s childhood. As a child, Elizabeth was often seen visiting the organ loft to watch the composer play, especially during Christmas.

– The Associated Press


11:45 a.m.

Marsha Lederman on the committal service

I breathed a huge sigh of relief when the coffin made it up the stairs and into the chapel. Those young men were working very hard. Hearing the psalm sung as the coffin entered brought me back into the moment.

As did the Dean of Windsor. He spoke about how Queen Elizabeth often prayed in this chapel. And he called on the rest of us to follow her example, even in these troubled times. “Her calm and dignified presence has given us confidence to face the future as she did, with courage and with hope.”

– Marsha Lederman


11:30 a.m.

Queen’s corgis wait by Windsor Castle for her funeral procession

Queen Elizabeth II’s beloved dogs and one of her favorite ponies greeted the late monarch’s coffin when it was brought to Windsor Castle.

Corgis Muick and Sandy were brought into the castle’s quadrangle for the coffin’s arrival following the queen’s funeral at Westminster Abbey and a drive through London and on to Windsor.

Queen Elizabeth's two corgis, Sandy and Muick, and her black pony Emma watched the late monarch's funeral procession in the grounds of Windsor Castle on Monday.

Reuters

Emma, a black fell pony the queen owned for 26 years, stood on the grass with a groom at the side of the Long Walk in front of the castle as the coffin procession marched past before a committal service at St. George’s Chapel.

The queen’s affection for her dogs and her horses was well known. She owned more than 30 corgis during her lifetime. Muick and Sandy have been rehomed with her son, Prince Andrew.

– The Associated Press


11:30 a.m.

Marsha Lederman: Windsor Castle feels ‘particularly sorrowful’

This is an entirely sad day, but this part at Windsor Castle feels particularly sorrowful. The sound of those regimented footsteps as the march behind the hearse continues, the bagpipes, the muffled bells of the chapel.

Watching King Charles: this is a very long day for him and a lot of walking. He’s 73 and his mother just died and he’s suddenly King and this must all be really hard. And there is a whole other service to get through now, followed by a private burial to come. (I know, I know, he has a life of privilege. But still.)

Also, the corgis.

Britain's Prince Andrew with royal corgis as they await the cortege on the day of the state funeral and burial of Queen Elizabeth.PETER NICHOLLS/Reuters

– Marsha Lederman


11:20 a.m.

The Queen’s committal service begins at Windsor Castle

Pall bearers carry the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II, with the Imperial State Crown resting on top, into St. George's Chapel.POOL/Reuters

A procession carrying Queen Elizabeth II’s coffin has entered St. George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle for the late monarch’s committal service.

Eight hundred guests are attending the service, including prime ministers from Commonwealth countries and many staff who worked with the queen or on her royal estates.

Most of those attending the chapel service did not attend the state funeral held at Westminster Abbey in London earlier Monday.

During the service, the Imperial State Crown and the sovereign’s orb and sceptre are removed from the top of the queen’s coffin and placed on an altar, separating the queen from her crown for the last time.

The Dean of Windsor reads a psalm and the queen’s coffin is lowered into the chapel’s royal vault.

Later Monday, the royals will hold a private service at the chapel, when the queen will be interred together with her late husband Prince Philip, who died last year at 99.

– The Associated Press


11:10 a.m.

The screens of London’s Hyde Park

Interesting to note that the screens in London’s Hyde Park aren’t showing BBC coverage of the funeral. It’s ITV instead.

Of course it’s wall-to-wall television coverage here in the UK on all channels and broadcasters expect to break all-time viewership records. The top two most watched events in UK history so far have been England’s World Cup win in 1966 and the funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales, in 1997.

People in Hyde Park watch the state funeral service of Britain's Queen Elizabeth II on giant screens.Lewis JOLY/The Associated Press

But the added viewers won’t translate into any extra revenue for private television or any media including newspapers There has been an agreed advertising blackout for the funeral and the days leading up to it.

– Paul Waldie


11:05 a.m.

‘Loved and remembered’: Queen Elizabeth funeral service draws thousands

Shops closed, businesses ground to a halt and the country paused for two minutes as Britain said a final farewell to Queen Elizabeth on Monday.

The Queen’s funeral at Westminster Abbey took place with pomp and ceremony before a congregation of 2,000 world leaders, honours recipients and heads of state from dozens of countries.

The service was taken from the 1662 Book of Common Prayer, the official prayerbook of the Church of England, and the hymns were chosen by Elizabeth. Among them was The Lord’s My Shepherd, I’ll Not Want, which was sung at the Queen’s wedding to the Duke of Edinburgh in 1947.

The state funeral for Queen Elizabeth at Westminster Abbey paid tribute to her life with readings, hymns and two minutes of silence. The Archbishop of Canterbury said the late monarch fulfilled her promise of dedicating her life to Britain and the Commonwealth.

Reuters

While the service was conducted before an exclusive audience in the Abbey, it was aimed at the masses of people who made their way to parks, city squares and even movie theatres to watch the proceedings. The funeral was broadcast in 125 cinemas and giant screens were set up in churches, city squares and open spaces across Britain.

Tens of thousands of people descended on London’s Hyde Park where the funeral was shown on six massive screens.

– Paul Waldie and Marieke Walsh


11 a.m.

In homes and gatherings, Canadians watch Queen Elizabeth’s funeral

People watch the funeral of Queen Elizabeth at the Burgundy Lion pub in Montreal.Graham Hughes/The Canadian Press

Canadians rose early on Monday to watch Queen Elizabeth’s state funeral service in groups or at home, saying they felt a sense of history occurring before their eyes.

While some Canadians made the trip to London to pay their respects, many took in the early-morning proceedings from their residences or local viewing parties.

Const. Tad Milmine, a member of the Calgary police force, traveled to the British capital to observe the funeral procession, saying he felt “overwhelmed” during the two minutes of silence when a hush fell over the crowd of tens of thousands he was standing with outside Buckingham Palace.

“All you could hear was the birds chirping … You could just sense how much the queen was loved here and around the world,” he said in a telephone interview.

About 6,000 kilometres to the west, in Yellowknife, Marie York-Condon arose at 4 a.m. local time to begin watching what she referred to as a “monumental historical event” that reminded her of when she swore allegiance to the queen as a civilian member of the RCMP: “I’m very affected by the fact that the person I dedicated my service to is no longer there,” she said.

Chelsea Taylor watched with about 30 guests at the Burgundy Lion Pub in Montreal as tea and coffee were served along with scones and sweets beginning at about 5 a.m. local time. The 27-year-old federal public servant had the day off work and wanted to mark the occasion in a distinct way, adding she is “not religious” and didn’t feel a connection to the religious liturgy.

“I don’t feel I have super strong emotions. It was just enjoyable to feel that you’re watching a part of history happening,” she said.

Mike Lau, A British national who grew up in Hong Kong, said it didn’t feel appropriate to take in such a major event alone at home looking at his laptop screen. Instead, he donned all black and headed to a Toronto pub to be surrounded by fellow mourners as they sipped tea and watched the procession on television.

“The queen is pretty much everywhere. Not only on the coins and the bills, but all the places that are named after the queen,” said the 25-year-old. “Once she passed away, it felt like the loss of a beloved grandma.”

– The Canadian Press


10:45 a.m.

Marsha Lederman reminisces on another Royal event at St. George’s Chapel

Looking at the stairs leading up to St. George’s Chapel, I’m remembering a very early morning watching Harry and Meghan’s wedding there four years ago. And it occurs to me that almost all of my near all-nighters with a TV screen over my lifetime have involved the Royal Family: Charles and Diana’s wedding, Diana’s shocking death, William and Kate’s wedding, Harry and Meghan’s. And now, the Queen’s funeral.

The hearse carrying her coffin, now adorned with flowers tossed by people along the route, is approaching the chapel for the committal service. Dignitaries are entering the chapel, including Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. And Liz Truss – who met the Queen and became UK Prime Minister less than two weeks ago.

Norma Major and former British Prime Minister John Major, Prime Minister of Canada Justin Trudeau and Sophie Grégoire arrive at St George's Chapel.JEFF J MITCHELL/AFP/Getty Images

– Marsha Lederman


10:20 a.m.

Mourners are lined along the Long Walk towards Windsor Castle

A marching band of the funeral procession passes along the Long Walk.PAUL CHILDS/Reuters

A crush of people are lined on either side of the Long Walk that leads to Windsor Castle.

Standing right in front of the police barricades, 14-year-old Leo Cowland and his family secured their spot at 6 a.m., arriving from nearby Reading to pay their respects.

Ten years ago Mr. Cowland met the Queen just up the road from where they were standing on Monday. Then just four years old, he was selected from the crowd during Elizabeth’s diamond jubilee to present a bouquet of pink roses to her. She was wearing a light blue dress.

“It was very special, it was just me and her, and her body guards around her, and she said ‘I hope you have a lovely day in Windsor,’” he said.

A decade later he said he was looking forward to being their for the final moments. “It’s good to see her again,” he said.

His mother, Vanessa, said she wanted her kids to be here to mark the moment in British history. “If you can be here, then you should be here. To respect the monarchy, to respect the 70 years of service, and appreciate everything that she did for us as a country.”

Jumbotrons stationed along the route aired the ceremonies in London as the tens of thousands of people waited for their moment to see the Royal Family and say goodbye to the Queen.

11-year-olds Aidan and Pomadou said they asked their mums to come to Windsor. The scene is chaotic and crowdy, but Pomadou said the turnout shows that the Queen’s “really been loved.”

The outpouring for the Queen is part of the country’s traditions, said Aidan’s mum Jayne Njeri. “We came here and founded traditions and so we have to follow suit.”

– Marieke Walsh


10:15 a.m.

The scene at London’s Hyde Park

The Queen’s funeral at Westminster Abbey ended hours ago but there’s still a large crowd in London’s Hyde Park watching the proceedings in Windsor. The sun is shining and food vendors around the park have been doing a brisk business. It’s become almost a giant picnic.

– Paul Waldie


10:15 a.m.

How mourners in Washington, D.C. are watching the Queen’s funeral

Growing up in Los Angeles with a British father and Canadian mother, Alex Thomson saw Queen Elizabeth II as a connection to his family history. He watched her annual addresses at Christmas, admiring her “constant duty” and how she incarnated “what it means to be English.”

“She was always this present figure to me,” said Mr. Thomson, a 29-year-old lawyer now living in Washington, DC. “She was a remarkable person who gave over 70 years of her life to her country.”

Mr. Thomson was one of a handful of mourners who came Monday morning to the Brighton, a British-themed sports bar on the Potomac waterfront, to watch the Queen’s funeral. The group was small, outnumbered by journalists and bar staff, who opened the place at 5.30 am and served tea to the assembled.

Devin Henderson, a host at the Brighton, circulated with a book of condolences and passed out cards for people to fill out. The bar planned to send them to the Royal Family, he said.

“I grew up as a Disney kid, seeing kings, queens, princesses, princes – it seemed fantastical. But here, today, we still have those remnants of monarchy,” he said.

So it goes for many in the U.S., including in this city founded by and named for the man who led history’s most successful rebellion against the British Crown. Despite breaking away from the empire nearly 250 years ago, there’s a lingering fascination with the pomp and circumstance of a mediaeval institution and the woman who represented its modern expression for most of living memory.

People watch the state funeral of Queen Elizabeth II at The Queen Vic pub in Washington, DC.STEFANI REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images

Neah Lekan said American interest in the monarchy largely stems from the fact that it is so different from anything that exists on this side of the Atlantic.

“In Britain, people have grown up with it, they’re used to it. Over here, we have such political divisions, the idea of a neutral head of state transcending politics – the idea of anything transcending politics – seems crazy,” he said.

Mr. Lekan, 22, is working on a PhD at Johns Hopkins University in cultural representations of the Crown during the Tudor and Stewart dynasties. He said his initial interest in the monarchy was inspired in large part by the Queen.

“She refashioned and reimagined what the Crown can mean,” said Mr. Lekan, who came down from Baltimore to watch the funeral at the Brighton. “It was the reimagination of the monarchy as a representation of the nation in the form of a neutral historical figure, who was Britannia.”

Adrian Morrow


10 a.m.

The Queen’s coffin continues toward Windsor Castle

As the Queen’s coffin continues west toward Windsor Castle, there are people lining the route – on highway dividers, on grassy patches by the side of the road, tossing flowers. As the hearse moves into Windsor, people are applauding along the route – at least those who aren’t holding their cell phones, capturing this moment of history.

For these people, this is a true day of mourning.

And no matter what one’s opinion might be about the monarchy as an institution, she as the head of it – as a leader and a human being – was respected, beloved. It’s hard to imagine that it won’t be quite different with King Charles.

– Marsha Lederman


9:35 a.m.

King Charles’s handwritten note to late queen: ‘In loving and devoted memory’

The coffin carrying Queen Elizabeth with the Imperial State Crown and a floral tribute rests on top.Jeff Spicer/Getty Images

King Charles paid tribute to his late mother Queen Elizabeth with a handwritten note laid on top of her coffin reading: “In loving and devoted memory, Charles R.”

The note was placed amid a colourful wreath for the late monarch that Buckingham Palace said contained, at Charles’s request, rosemary, English Oak and myrtle, which had been cut from a plant grown from myrtle used in Elizabeth’s wedding bouquet.

The King also asked that the wreath be crafted sustainably, using English moss and oak branches, and no floral foam.

There were also gold, pink, burgundy and white flowers cut from the gardens of royal residences.

– Reuters


9:20 a.m.

Which members of the Royal Family were at the Queen’s funeral?

Britain’s Royal Family gathered alongside hundreds of world leaders and dignitaries at Westminster Abbey for the Queen’s funeral service. They lowered their heads as Household Cavalry trumpeters played “The Last Post” at the end of the service, and joined the coffin procession throughout London.

King Charles, his sons Prince William and Prince Harry, and other senior royals – Princess Anne, Prince Andrew and Prince Edward – walked behind Queen Elizabeth’s coffin through the streets of London during the solemn procession.

Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, Queen Camilla, Prince George, Princess Charlotte, Catherine, Princess of Wales, and Sophie, Countess of Wessex stand outside after the state funeral.WPA Pool/Getty Images

Who else was there?

  • Queen Consort Camilla;
  • Catherine, Princess of Wales, alongside her two elder children, Prince George of Wales, Princess Charlotte of Wales;
  • Meghan, Duchess of Sussex
  • Sophie, Countess of Wessex
  • Vice Admiral. Sir Timothy Laurence
  • Princess Eugenie alongside her mother Sarah Ferguson, Princess Beatrice and her husband Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi;
  • More of the Queen’s grandchildren: Peter Phillips, Zara Tindall, Lady Louise Windsor, and James, Viscount Severn.

The Royal Family will make their way to Windsor Castle ahead of the committal service at St. George’s Chapel.

– Globe staff


8:50 a.m.

The Queen’s coffin departs from Wellington Arch

The Royal Hearse carrying the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II at Wellington Arch in London, England.David Ramos/AFP/Getty Images

The coffin has now been transferred to a hearse and the body of Queen Elizabeth II is travelling by car to her final resting place, Windsor Castle. There the committal service will take place at St. George’s Chapel. God Save the King is played and King Charles salutes his mum.

This is a solemn occasion, of course, the death of the Queen, but it may be hard for some not to bristle at all of this pomp and circumstance – and attention – in contrast to some of the headlines coming up on the crawl at the bottom of the world’s TV screens: Hurricane Fiona causes catastrophic damage to Puerto Rico, makes landfall in the Dominican Republic. Russian shelling near a nuclear plant. A prisoner exchange between the U.S. and Afghanistan.

As the Queen’s glassed-in hearse makes its way slowly west, flowers are being tossed by members of the public lining the streets. And the world’s tragedies roar on.

– Marsha Lederman


8:35 a.m.

Some roads will be closed ahead of Ottawa’s commemorative ceremony

Roads are closed in downtown Ottawa ahead of today’s memorial parade honouring the life and reign of Queen Elizabeth.

Members of the military and RCMP will parade through the streets of the capital at 12:10 p.m. ET and sound a 96-gun salute – one salvo for every year of the queen’s life.

Following a service at Christ Church Cathedral, Royal Canadian Air Force CF-18 fighter jets will perform a flypast over the cathedral and Parliament Hill.

The commemoration will be televised, and members of the public will also be able to watch the events live on screens set up along Wellington Street.

– The Canadian Press


8:25 a.m.

Marsha Lederman on ‘watching the coffin pass Buckingham Palace’

Watching the coffin pass Buckingham Palace as the palace staff are lined up outside to pay their respects is particularly affecting. These are people who would have known Queen Elizabeth in a somewhat intimate way.

For them, this is a personal loss.

And then there is the question of possible upheaval in their lives. What will it mean for them with Charles as King? As these men and women say a silent, solemn good-bye, the Queen passes the palace for one final time.

– Marsha Lederman


8:15 a.m.

Doug Sanders: A glimpse of the London procession through a series of tweets

Doug Sanders


7:50 a.m.

Royal Family marches behind Queen’s coffin in London procession

King Charles III and Prince Harry follow the coffin of Queen Elizabeth.WPA Pool/Getty Images

The Queen’s children as well as Prince William and Prince Harry are marching behind the Queen’s coffin as the procession heads to Wellington Arch.

Behind them, Princess Kate and the Queen Consort are in a car with Prince George, the future King, and Princess Charlotte. A funeral is a gruelling occasion for any family experiencing a loss. To have to grieve in the spotlight, and within the confines of pomp and circumstance, must really be something.

– Marsha Lederman


7:35 a.m.

RCMP officers lead funeral procession to Wellington Arch

Royal Canadian Mounted Police during the state funeral of Queen Elizabeth.WPA Pool/Getty Images

Four RCMP musical ride members lead the procession from Westminster Abbey to the Wellington Arch. The officers are riding horses gifted to the RCMP by Queen Elizabeth.

The RCMP say the officers and horses taking part are Cst. Katy Loisel riding George; Cpl. Justine Rogawski riding Elizabeth; Williamson riding Darby; Supt. Kevin Fahey riding Sir John; and Cpl. Derek Quilley assisting the RCMP delegation.

Tens of thousands are gathered in central London to watch the procession of the Queen’s coffin through the city.

– The Canadian Press


7:30 a.m.

The Queen’s coffin makes last procession through London

The Royal Family follow the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II as it is carried out of Westminster Abbey during her funeral in central London.Frank Augstein/Pool AP

Queen Elizabeth II’s coffin is being taken on a gun carriage from Westminster Abbey for a last procession through the heart of London.

The coffin is being transported to Windsor, outside the British capital, where the former monarch will be laid to rest later Monday.

King Charles III and other senior royals are marching behind the coffin to Wellington Arch at Hyde Park Corner. Tens of thousands of people are lining the route.

Queen Elizabeth's coffin was taken from Westminster Abbey to Wellington Arch after the state funeral, where it was transferred to a hearse to begin its journey to Windsor. Four RCMP members lead the procession as the Royal Family marched behind the gun carriage bearing the coffin.

Reuters

Gun salutes are being fired in nearby Hyde Park, and Big Ben is tolling at one-minute intervals during the procession.

The coffin is to be taken by hearse to Windsor, where the queen will be interred alongside her late husband, Prince Philip, who died last year.

– The Associated Press


7:15 a.m.

Marsha Lederman: ‘It is very difficult not to feel emotional’

A general view inside Westminster Abbey.Gareth Cattermole/The Associated Press

It is very difficult not to feel emotional watching the conclusion of the Queen’s funeral service. The trumpets, the bagpipes. The Last Post was followed by two minutes of silence, and then Reveille. And, oh my goodness, the singing of God Save the King by the congregation. That was followed by the Queen’s Piper performing the Lament.

Exquisite and powerful. And now her coffin is slowly being carried out of the Abbey, with the Royal Family following slowly behind.

– Marsha Lederman


6:56 a.m.

Two minutes of silence observed across the UK

Mourners at Westminster Abbey observe a moment of silence to remember Queen Elizabeth amid scenes of pageantry during her funeral.

Reuters

At 11:56 a.m. local time, the Last Post was sounded by the State Trumpeters of the Household Cavalry from the steps of the Lady Chapel. Two minutes’ silence were then observed across the United Kingdom.

The Reveille was sounded by the State Trumpeters before the congregation sang “God Save the King”.

Hyde Park fell almost completely quiet during two minutes of silence. Thousands stand, some hold hands. Then loud applause when it’s over and singing of “God Save the King”.

– Reuters and Paul Waldie


6:45 a.m.

Marsha Lederman: ‘This is a very stirring service’

This is a very stirring service. It must be extraordinarily moving to hear this glorious choral music in the Abbey.

Edward, sitting in the front row by his mother’s coffin, along with his siblings and their partners, seemed to be particularly emotional, requiring the use of a handkerchief. Prince Harry and Meghan are relegated to the second row, behind the King.

The Archbishop of Canterbury is delivering the sermon.

“The pattern for many leaders is to be exalted in life and forgotten in life after death,” he said. Not Queen Elizbeth. He spoke of the Queen declaring on her 21st birthday broadcast to dedicate her life to service. And how she lived up to that throughout her long life. “Few leaders receive the outpouring of love that we have seen.”

Indeed.

– Marsha Lederman


6:35 a.m.

The Queen’s funeral service: order of events

  • The funeral is being led by the Dean of Westminster David Hoyle, and the sermon will be given by the Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby.
  • At the start of the service, as the queen’s coffin was carried into the abbey, the Sentences were sung by the choir of Westminster Abbey. The five Sentences - lines of scripture set to music - have been used at every state funeral since the early 18th century.
  • The Dean of Westminster gave the bidding before the first hymn, and the Secretary-General of the Commonwealth, Baroness Scotland, read the first lesson from the book of First Corinthians.
  • A specially commissioned choral piece composed by the Master of the King’s Music, Judith Weir, was sung by the choir. The piece, “Like as the Hart”, is a setting of Psalm 42 to music.
  • The second lesson, from the Gospel of John, was read by British Prime Minister Liz Truss, and was followed by the hymn “The Lord’s my Shepherd”. The hymn was also sung at the queen’s wedding in 1947.
  • Following the sermon, the choir sang the anthem “My Soul, There is a Country”.
  • Prayers were said from the High Altar before the choir sang a short anthem, “O Taste and See How Gracious the Lord is”, which was composed by Ralph Vaughan Williams for the queen’s coronation in 1953.
  • The Archbishop of Canterbury gave the commendation, speaking to the queen’s years of service and extending condolences to the Royal Family, as well as families around the world who have recently lost a loved one.
  • At the end of the funeral, the Sovereign’s Piper of the Royal Regiment of Scotland played the traditional lament “Sleep, Dearie, Sleep”.
  • Afterwards, the bells of Westminster Abbey were rung, fully muffled, which is the tradition following the funeral of the sovereign.

– Reuters


6:25 a.m.

Thousands head to Windsor Castle ahead of Queen’s burial

In Windsor, thousands of people descended on the small town west of London to watch the final part of Monday’s services for Queen Elizabeth. People gathered in pubs and bars to watch the morning funeral service, before going to the Long Walk, where one last procession will take place.

Windsor is home to the oldest and largest occupied castle in the world, according to the Royal Collection Trust, it has housed 40 monarchs.

On its grounds is the royal vault, in St. George’s Chapel, where Queen Elizabeth will be interred. During the committal service, the choir will sing the same song that was also part of the service for the Queen’s Husband, the Duke of Edinburgh, when he died last year. The service will begin at 4 p.m. local time.

The committal service marks the symbolic end of the Queen’s reign. During the service, the orb, sceptre and crown, which have sat atop her coffin during the lying in state in London, will be removed by the crown jeweller.

Before her coffin descends into the vault, King Charles will place the Grenadier Guards’ Queen’s Company Camp Colour, her regimental flag, on the casket.

The Grenadier Guards are the most senior regiment of Foot Guards, and the Queen held the position of Company Commander during her reign.

– Marieke Walsh


6:15 a.m.

Queen Elizabeth’s coffin arrives at Westminster Abbey

Queen Elizabeth’s funeral procession has arrived at the West Gate of Westminster Abbey for a state funeral service.

Pallbearers have lifted the coffin from the state gun carriage and carried it inside the Gothic medieval abbey where 2,000 mourners stood as it entered Monday.

Pall bearers carry the coffin of Britain's Queen Elizabeth into Westminster Abbey.JOHN SIBLEY/Reuters

Crowds lined the route of the procession through London. Bagpipes played as soldiers in bear skin hats and 142 sailors escorted the coffin from Westminster Hall, where the queen lay in state for four full days for the public to pay their respects ahead of her funeral.

The queen’s coffin is draped with the royal standard and a wreath of flowers including blooms and foliage cut from the gardens of Buckingham Palace and Clarence House at Charles’s request.

They include rosemary for remembrance, and myrtle cut from a plant that was grown from a sprig of myrtle in the queen’s wedding bouquet in 1947.

– The Associated Press


6:10 a.m.

Queen Elizabeth’s coffin makes way to Westminster Abbey

Britain's King Charles III and members of the Royal family follow a gun carriage carrying the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II during her funeral service in Westminster Abbey.JOSHUA BRATT/AFP/Getty Images

Shortly before 11 a.m. local time (6 a.m. ET), Queen Elizabeth’s oak coffin, covered in the Royal Standard flag with the Imperial State Crown on top, emerged under overcast skies to be taken by military procession to Westminster Abbey.

King Charles and his three younger siblings, Anne, Andrew and Edward, made up the first line behind the gun carriage pulled by 142 Royal Navy sailors that bore the queen’s coffin.

Behind them came Charles’s sons, Princes William and Harry, and other senior members of the royal family, their grave faces showing the emotional impact of the solemn moment.

Tens of thousands of people lining the streets looked on as bagpipes skirled. Earlier, hundreds of armed personnel in full ceremonial dress marched past in a historic display of kilts, bearskin hats, scarlet tunics and bands in white gloves.

The coffin of Britain's Queen Elizabeth is carried in the procession to Westminster Abbey.JOHN SIBLEY/Reuters

Among the crowds who came from around Britain and beyond, people were climbing lampposts and standing on barriers and ladders to catch a glimpse of the royal procession - one of the largest of its kind in modern history in the capital.

Millions more will watch on television at home on a public holiday declared for the occasion.

– Reuters


5:55 a.m.

Marsha Lederman: ‘The TV coverage is full-on for this moment in history’

Good morning from Vancouver, where it is either very early or very late. The TV coverage is full-on for this moment in history.

Over the weekend, I’ve been thinking a lot about what it must be like for the Royals to mourn this private loss so publicly. That can’t be easy. Sure, King Charles’s pen tantrum was cringey and worthy of ridicule, but he wouldn’t be the first person to lose it inappropriately in a moment of grief. (King Charles; that feels weird to write – will it ever not?)

Dignitaries have been shuffling into Westminster Abbey at this hour, including U.S. President Joe Biden and former UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson. And now the Queen Consort, Princess Catherine and her two older children, including the future King, have arrived. Again, my overwhelming thought is: what must it be like to have to grieve with TV cameras following your every move?

Marsha Lederman


5:45 a.m.

Trudeau, Canadian delegation attend state funeral

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his wife, Sophie Grégoire Trudeau, led the Canadian delegation that was ushered into the church in the hours leading up to the service.

Canadian Prime minister Justin Trudeau and Sophie Gregoire Trudeau attend the funeral of Queen Elizabeth in Westminster Abbey.POOL/Reuters

They were seated a few rows behind Gov. Gen. Mary Simon and her husband, the Canadian delegation members sitting closest to King Charles and other senior royals.

Other members of the Canadian delegation have also arrived at the abbey.

– The Canadian Press


5 :40 a.m.

Big screens set up across Hyde Park as thousands of mourners expected

In London’s Hyde Park, people began arriving before dawn to get a spot in front of one of the six giant screens that have been set up. The funeral is being shown in parks across the country as well as in 125 movie theatres and dozens of cathedrals and city squares.

Jill Wilson brought a giant Paddington Bear she made. “It took me two days,” she said as she sat in a lawn chair next to the bear. “I just wanted to do it in honour of the Queen.”

Alan Dyer and his wife Louisa brought their two children to Hyde Park — three-year Amber and nine-year old Ronnie — to watch the funeral. “It’s a bit of history for them,” said Mr. Dyer. “They’ll remember this for the rest of their lives”.

Ian Paternatte, 53, stood in Hyde Park wearing his Royal Navy beret and six medals that he had received for service in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere. Mr. Paternatte spent 27 years in the navy as a gunnery instructor and he took the train from Portsmouth to watch the funeral. “She was my ultimate boss at the end of the day,” he said referring to the Queen’s role as commander of the military. “I’ve come up to pay my respects.”

– Paul Waldie


5 :35 a.m.

Where Canadians can watch Queen Elizabeth’s funeral

The state funeral and committal service will be televised by networks including BBC, CNN and CBC. Online, the Royal Family and BBC will stream the service on YouTube, as will CBC and CTV. A memorial parade and commemorative ceremony will take place in Ottawa on Monday at 10:10 a.m. ET, which will also be televised by Canadian networks.

The Globe and Mail will also cover the Queen’s funeral and live events throughout the day, including a livestream and special coverage from reporters in London and Ottawa.

- Globe staff


5 :25 a.m.

The list of Canadian delegates attending the Queen’s funeral

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Governor-General Mary Simon and actor Sandra Oh are among the 19 delegates who will represent Canada.

  • The delegation will include Mr. Trudeau, Governor-General Mary Simon and former prime ministers Kim Campbell, Jean Chrétien, Paul Martin and Stephen Harper.
  • Former governors-general Michaëlle Jean and David Johnston will also be attending.
  • The leaders of the three groups representing Indigenous people in Canada – Assembly of First Nations National Chief RoseAnne Archibald, President of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami Natan Obed, and President of the Métis National Council Cassidy Caron – will attend.
  • The Canadian delegation also includes members of the Order of Canada: actor Sandra Oh, Olympic champion Mark Tewksbury and musician Gregory Charles. In addition, Cross of Valour recipient Leslie Arthur Palmer will represent Canada at the funeral.
  • Ralph Goodale, the current High Commissioner for Canada in the United Kingdom, and Janice Charette, Clerk of the Privy Council and the former High Commissioner, will also be in attendance.
  • The Prime Minister’s wife, Sophie Grégoire Trudeau, will also join the delegation, as will Ms. Simon’s husband, Whit Fraser.

– Marieke Walsh


5 a.m.

How Queen Elizabeth will be honoured at Ottawa’s commemorative ceremony

Canadians are being invited to line the streets of Ottawa today to pay their respects to Queen Elizabeth, as a memorial parade makes its way along a 2.2-kilometre route ending at Christ Church Cathedral. There, a national commemorative ceremony for the late monarch will take place.

The parade will consist of Canadian Armed Forces and Royal Canadian Mounted Police members, and will begin at 12:10 a.m. at the Cartier Square Drill Hall in downtown Ottawa. The parade will also feature a gun salute of 96 salvos – one for each year of the Queen’s life. The approximately 75-minute ceremony at the cathedral will begin at 1 p.m.

The commemorative ceremony will include both secular and religious elements, including a tribute by Albert Dumont, Algonquin spiritual teacher-in-residence at Christ Church Cathedral; music by the cathedral organist and choir members; prayers and readings; and an address by an “eminent Canadian,” whom government officials declined to name on Wednesday.

About 600 invited guests will attend the ceremony, which the public will be able to watch on a screen at the Garden of the Provinces and Territories near the cathedral, as well as online. The invited guests will comprise parliamentarians, representatives of the Canadian Armed Forces and RCMP, as well as members of the diplomatic corps, faith communities, and certain high-profile Canadians.

The ceremony will conclude with a fly-past over Parliament Hill by CF-18 Hornet fighter jets, government officials said.

Marsha McLeod


5 a.m.

Buckingham Palace shares details of the Queen’s state funeral

Queen Elizabeth II will be laid to rest in a funeral service at Westminster Abbey that will include more than 10,000 servicemen and women, and two minutes of silence across Britain.

The Queen’s coffin has been lying in state in Westminster Hall since Wednesday and hundreds of thousands of people have paid their respects. On Monday morning, the coffin will be carried on a gun carriage to Westminster Abbey with King Charles III and other members of the Royal Family walking behind.

The funeral service will begin at 11 a.m. local time (6 a.m. ET), and last an hour. It will be attended by 2,000 guests, including Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, U.S. President Joe Biden and other heads of state from across the globe. British Prime Minister Liz Truss and Patricia Scotland, the Commonwealth Secretary General, will read passages from the Bible and the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, will deliver a sermon.

The funeral day began with a procession of the coffin to Westminster Abbey, which was first consecrated in 1065 for Edward the Confessor. Afterward, it was paraded across London to the Wellington Arch.

LONDON

Windsor

Castle

0

20

KM

Hyde

Park

St. James’

Palace

Admiralty

Arch

Horse

Guards

The Mall

Big Ben

10 Downing St.

Buckingham

Palace

Wellington

Arch

Westminster

Abbey

Palace of

Westminster

FUNERAL SCHEDULE

1

Sept. 19, 10:44 a.m. local time:

Queen’s coffin goes from Westminster Hall on Royal Navy State Gun Carriage, followed on foot by King and senior members of Royal Family

2

10:52 a.m.: Procession arrives at Westminster Abbey

3

11 a.m.: Funeral service begins, conducted by Dean of Westminster David Hoyle, with Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby giving sermon. Service attended by 2,000 guests, including members of Royal Family, European royals and heads of state from around the world

4

11:55 a.m.: Last Post sounded, followed by national two-minute silence. Service ends with national anthem, then lament played by Queen’s piper

5

12 p.m.: Coffin replaced on State Gun Carriage and taken to Wellington Arch, Hyde Park Corner, in procession led by Royal Canadian Mounted Police and members of NHS staff. Big Ben tolls and guns fire in Hyde Park at one-minute intervals

6

1 p.m.: Queen’s coffin transferred to hearse and driven to St. George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle

WESTMINSTER ABBEY

Contains tombs or memorials of over 3,300 prominent Britons including 17 monarchs, eight prime ministers, writers, musicians, actors, scientists and military leaders

ROYAL COFFIN

Draped in Royal Standard, adorned with crown, orb, sceptre and wreath of flowers. Carried through nave and quire to platform by eight Grenadier Guards

STATE GUN CARRIAGE

Last seen in 1979 for funeral of Lord Mountbatten

40 sailors behind

acting as brake

Pulled by 98 sailors

using drag ropes

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: TILEZEN; OPENSTREETMAP CONTRIBUTORS; GRAPHIC NEWS; REUTERS

LONDON

Windsor

Castle

0

20

KM

Hyde

Park

St. James’

Palace

Admiralty

Arch

Horse

Guards

The Mall

Big Ben

10 Downing St.

Buckingham

Palace

Wellington

Arch

Westminster

Abbey

Palace of

Westminster

FUNERAL SCHEDULE

1

Sept. 19, 10:44 a.m. local time:

Queen’s coffin goes from Westminster Hall on Royal Navy State Gun Carriage, followed on foot by King and senior members of Royal Family

2

10:52 a.m.: Procession arrives at Westminster Abbey

3

11 a.m.: Funeral service begins, conducted by Dean of Westminster David Hoyle, with Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby giving sermon. Service attended by 2,000 guests, including members of Royal Family, European royals and heads of state from around the world

4

11:55 a.m.: Last Post sounded, followed by national two-minute silence. Service ends with national anthem, then lament played by Queen’s piper

5

12 p.m.: Coffin replaced on State Gun Carriage and taken to Wellington Arch, Hyde Park Corner, in procession led by Royal Canadian Mounted Police and members of NHS staff. Big Ben tolls and guns fire in Hyde Park at one-minute intervals

6

1 p.m.: Queen’s coffin transferred to hearse and driven to St. George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle

WESTMINSTER ABBEY

Contains tombs or memorials of over 3,300 prominent Britons including 17 monarchs, eight prime ministers, writers, musicians, actors, scientists and military leaders

ROYAL COFFIN

Draped in Royal Standard, adorned with crown, orb, sceptre and wreath of flowers. Carried through nave and quire to platform by eight Grenadier Guards

STATE GUN CARRIAGE

Last seen in 1979 for funeral of Lord Mountbatten

40 sailors behind

acting as brake

Pulled by 98 sailors

using drag ropes

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: TILEZEN; OPENSTREETMAP CONTRIBUTORS; GRAPHIC NEWS; REUTERS

Piccadilly Circus

LONDON

Charing

Cross

6

TRAFALGAR

SQUARE

Detail

Windsor

Castle

Pall Mall

Embankment

0

20

Admiralty

Arch

KM

Horse Guards

St. James’ Palace

Hyde

Park

Green Park

Hyde Park

Corner

The Mall

10 Downing St.

St. James’ Park

5

Big Ben

Buckingham

Palace

Wellington

Arch

Birdcage Walk

1

St. James’ Park

Victoria St.

2, 3 and 4

CENTRAL LONDON

Westminster

Abbey

Palace of

Westminster

0

100

m

FUNERAL SCHEDULE

1

4

Sept. 19, 10:44 a.m. local time:

Queen’s coffin goes from Westminster Hall on Royal Navy State Gun Carriage, followed on foot by King and senior members of Royal Family

11:55 a.m.: Last Post sounded, followed by national two-minute silence. Service ends with national anthem, then lament played by Queen’s piper

5

12 p.m.: Coffin replaced on State Gun Carriage and taken to Wellington Arch, Hyde Park Corner, in procession led by Royal Canadian Mounted Police and members of NHS staff. Big Ben tolls and guns fire in Hyde Park at one-minute intervals

2

10:52 a.m.: Procession arrives at Westminster Abbey

3

11 a.m.: Funeral service begins, conducted by Dean of Westminster David Hoyle, with Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby giving sermon. Service attended by 2,000 guests, including members of Royal Family, European royals and heads of state from around the world

6

1 p.m.: Queen’s coffin transferred to hearse and driven to St. George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle

WESTMINSTER ABBEY

Contains tombs or memorials of over 3,300 prominent Britons including 17 monarchs, eight prime ministers, writers, musicians, actors, scientists and military leaders

Tomb of Henry VII

High Altar

Tomb of Unknown Warrior

Resting place of unidentified soldier killed in World War I

Tomb of Mary,

Queen of Scots

Tomb of Elizabeth I

ROYAL COFFIN

Draped in Royal Standard, adorned with crown, orb, sceptre and wreath of flowers. Carried through nave and quire to platform by eight Grenadier Guards

Nave

Quire

STATE GUN CARRIAGE

Last seen in 1979 for funeral of Lord Mountbatten

40 sailors behind

acting as brake

Pulled by 98 sailors

using drag ropes

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: TILEZEN; OPENSTREETMAP CONTRIBUTORS; GRAPHIC NEWS; REUTERS

After the service, the Queen’s coffin will be carried through the historic heart of London, from Westminster Abbey to Wellington Arch near Buckingham Palace on a horse-drawn gun carriage with Charles and other royals walking behind.

From London, the coffin will move to Windsor Castle where the Queen will be interred next to her husband, Prince Philip, in St. George’s Chapel. Mr. Trudeau and other prime ministers of the realms will attend both the funeral at Westminster Abbey and the committal service at St. George’s Chapel.

At the end of the service, the coffin will be lowered into the Royal Vault and the sovereign’s piper will play a lament. The Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, will pronounce the blessing and the congregation will sing “God Save The King.”

Britain has been in a period of mourning since the Queen died on Sept. 8. On Sunday, King Charles released a statement thanking people for their condolences.

Paul Waldie and Marieke Walsh