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Biden bans Russian planes from U.S. airspace; Russian forces mount a major new offensive; price of oil surges above $100 a barrel

This digest has now been archived. Find the latest Russia-Ukraine updates here.

City officials in Przemysl have been scrambling to cope with the influx of Ukrainians fleeing the war, forcing some to stay in the train station overnight.Anna Liminowicz/The Globe and Mail

Editor’s note: Live coverage on this story has ended. Please follow our latest coverage here.

Russia has invaded Ukraine. Here are the latest updates:

  • Russian forces mounted a major new offensive, shelling Mariupol, surrounding Kherson, killing dozens of soldiers in Okhtyrka, striking a government building in central Kharkiv with a missile and a television tower in Kyiv killing five people. Troops advanced on the capital and reached the outskirts with a 65-kilometre long military convoy that has since stalled.
  • Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky urged the European Union to prove that it sided with Ukraine in its war with Russia as the World Court says it will hold hearings on March 7-8.
  • U.S. President Joe Biden joined allies in banning Russian planes from U.S. airspace during his State of the Union address. Beijing is offers to play role in ending attack on Ukraine after receiving criticism for appearing to stand by Russia. Ottawa is banning Russian ships from Canadian waters.
  • A United Nations agency said at least 136 civilians have been killed, including 13 children, 400 have been injured and more than 660,000 people have fled Ukraine. Canada is providing the UN $100-million in new humanitarian assistance.

  • Ilona Koval, from Odessa, weeps as she traveled together with some of the girls she trained as figure skaters, at a temporary refugee camp on the Ukrainian border in Palanca, Moldova.LAETITIA VANCON/The New York Times News Service

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11:18 p.m. ET

Putin will pay ‘over the long run’ for Ukraine invasion, Biden says in State of the Union address

U.S. President Joe Biden said Russian leader Vladimir Putin must be harshly punished for the invasion of Ukraine to stop other authoritarians from emulating his attack on the democratic world, framing the war as an existential fight against autocracy.

“Throughout our history, we’ve learned this lesson: when dictators do not pay a price for their aggression, they cause more chaos. They keep moving, and the costs and threats to America and to the world keep rising.”

Mr. Biden emphasized the unity of the Western alliance in imposing unprecedented sanctions on Moscow, vowing that Mr. Putin would come out of the struggle far worse off. He also announced further measures, including that the U.S. would join the European Union and Canada in closing its airspace to Russian planes, and seize luxury yachts belonging to oligarchs.

He ruled out sending U.S. forces to Ukraine, an acknowledgment both of Americans’ refusal to get into another war after debacles in Iraq and Afghanistan, and of the risks of escalation. Mr. Putin has already threatened to use his nuclear arsenal in response to Western sanctions.

-Adrian Morrow


10:51 p.m. ET

Analysis: In first State of the Union address, Biden captures the moment telling Putin ‘freedom will always triumph over tyranny’

The annual State of the Union Address is an American set-piece, a sturdy tradition required by the Constitution, and beginning with the 20th century, 87 of these messages have been delivered in person and most of them have concentrated on domestic affairs.

Not this one.

Not in a Capitol sealed off by a fence. Not in a capital warily watching the Russian invasion of Ukraine and shuddering as Vladimir Putin has his nuclear forces on alert.

“The world is clearly choosing the side of peace and security,” Joe Biden said, telling Ukrainians, represented in the hall by Oksana Markarova, Kyiv’s ambassador to Washington, “We stand with you.”

The principal elements of the speech were addressed as much to Mr. Putin as to the audience in the chamber and at home across the country.

“The free world is holding him accountable,” Mr. Biden said, adding that the Russian president was “more isolated from the world than he has ever been.”

-David Shribman


10:01 p.m. ET

Asian shares slip, oil surges again as Russia sanctions bite

Asian stocks came under renewed pressure and oil prices jumped after rising worries about the impact of aggressive sanctions against Russia over its invasion of Ukraine sank shares in Europe and on Wall Street.

The S&P 500 and Nasdaq Composite indexes closed about 1.6% lower, while the Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped nearly 1.8%.

Global sanctions against Russia have prompted a string of major companies to announce suspensions to or exits from their businesses in the country.

Exxon Mobil said on Tuesday that it will exit Russia operations, including oil production fields, following similar decisions by British oil giants BP PLC and Shell, and Norway’s Equinor ASA.

Exxon’s announcement comes as the price of oil continues to surge above $100 per barrel. On Wednesday morning, global benchmark Brent crude jumped 2.6% to $107.69 per barrel, and U.S. West Texas Intermediate crude rose 3% o $106.50.

-Reuters


9:29 p.m. ET

Alberta investment agency to sell off Russian assets

Alberta’s public-investment manager Alberta Investment Management Corp., or AIMCo, says it has started divesting all of its small measure of Russian holdings in response to the invasion of Ukraine and the ensuing humanitarian crisis.

The public-investment manager holds more than $160-billion in assets for provincial pension plans and endowments and said in a news release that the decision is “both values, and value-driven” and reflects the change in geopolitical risk.

At the end of last week, AIMCo’s exposure was about $159-million, or roughly 0.1 per cent of its total assets, according to the fund manager’s spokesperson Dénes Németh. But by this week, that number had dropped.

AIMCo’s news release also said the Russian holdings now represent 0.16 per cent of the entire $48.7-billion public-equities portfolio and areexternally managed. “Beyond public equities, AIMCo does not have any direct exposure to Russia.”

-Kelly Cryderman in Calgary


Watch: U.S. President Joe Biden gives State of the Union Address

Joe Biden announced a ban on Russian flights from American airspace during his State of the Union speech on Tuesday night in Washington.

Biden addressed Russian President Vladimir Putin’s invasion of Ukraine and rising inflation during his annual message delivered to U.S. Congress on the current condition of the nation.

-Reuters, The Associated Press


8:04 p.m. ET

U.S. to ban Russian flights from American airspace, officials say

The U.S. government is set to announce a ban on Russian flights from American airspace following similar moves by the European Union and Canada, government and industry officials told Reuters.

The precise timing is unclear but is expected within the next 24 hours, the sources said.

United Airlines said it has temporarily suspended flying over Russian airspace, joining Delta Air Lines, American Airlines and United Parcel Service who all confirmed this week they had halted flights over Russia.

-Reuters


6:48 p.m. ET

Former Afghan translator flees Ukraine to safety

Jawed Haqmal, former Canadian military translator in Afghanistan, took this photo after crossing the Ukrainian border into Przemysl, Poland with his family on March 1, 2022.Jawed Haqmal

From inside a Polish school near the border with Ukraine that’s been converted to a shelter for refugees, Jawed Haqmal says he can’t believe what his family experienced over the past five days in Kyiv and he’s feeling incredibly relieved to have made it to safety.

“Finally I escaped that country, this is the second war. I hope there will not be a third,” Mr. Haqmal told The Globe and Mail on Tuesday evening after the nearly 20-hour trip. Mr. Haqmal and his family had fled war in Afghanistan after the Taliban takeover last summer, only to find themselves fleeing Russia’s war in Ukraine.

Mr. Haqmal worked as an interpreter for the Canadian military in Afghanistan and had been living in a Kyiv hotel with his family since the end of August. His family of 12 were evacuated by Ukrainian special forces, a mission carried out after a request from The Globe to the office of Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. Their stay in Ukraine was meant to be temporary but ended up feeling at times indefinite as they waited, and still wait, for resettlement approval from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada, or IRCC.

- Janice Dickson in Ottawa


6:30 p.m. ET

‘We w

6:13 p.m. ET

‘We were ready,’ Biden will say in State of the Union address

U.S. President Joe Biden will say on Tuesday at 9 p.m. ET that the West was ready for Russian President Vladimir Putin’s invasion of Ukraine and his administration is prepared with a plan to fight inflation, according to excerpts of his State of the Union address.

”Throughout our history we’ve learned this lesson - when dictators do not pay a price for their aggression, they cause more chaos. They keep moving. And, the costs and threats to America and the world keep rising,” Biden will say, according to excerpts of his address released by the White House.

Biden will say that Putin eschewed efforts to prevent war.

- Reuters


5:45 p.m. ET

Armed convoy headed for Kyiv stalls

Satellite image of a Russian military convoy stretching over 65 kilometres advancing on KyivReuters

Occupied by Russian forces

Recent explosions/clashes

Prybirsk

0

10

Russian tanks and other

KM

military vehicles in convoy,

north of Kyiv

Ivankiv

Hostomel

airport:

Kyiv

Captured by

Reservoir

Russian forces

on Feb. 25

Obolon

district

Borodyanka

Brovary

Makariv

Presidential

Bucha

Office

Sikorsky

International Airport

KYIV

Boryspil

Kyiv

airport

UKRAINE

Dnieper River

Security Service

of Ukraine (SBU)

headquarters

Black Sea

*As of March 1.

GRAPHIC NEWS, SOURCES: INSTITUTE FOR THE

STUDY OF WAR, MAXAR TECHNOLOGIES; REUTERS

Recent explosions/clashes

Occupied by Russian forces

Prybirsk

Russian tanks and other

0

10

military vehicles in convoy,

KM

north of Kyiv

Ivankiv

Hostomel

airport:

Kyiv

Captured by

Reservoir

Russian forces

on Feb. 25

Obolon

district

Borodyanka

Brovary

Makariv

Presidential

Bucha

Office

Sikorsky

International Airport

KYIV

Boryspil

Kyiv

airport

UKRAINE

Dnieper River

Security Service

of Ukraine (SBU)

headquarters

Black Sea

*As of March 1.

GRAPHIC NEWS, SOURCES: INSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY OF

WAR, MAXAR TECHNOLOGIES; REUTERS

Prybirsk

Occupied by

Russian tanks and other

Russian forces

military vehicles in convoy,

north of Kyiv

Recent

Ivankiv

explosions /

clashes

Hostomel

*As of March 1.

airport:

Kyiv

Captured by

Reservoir

Russian forces

on Feb. 25

Borodyanka

Obolon

district

Makariv

Brovary

Presidential

Bucha

Office

Sikorsky

International Airport

Boryspil

airport

KYIV

Kyiv

Dnieper River

UKRAINE

Security Service

of Ukraine (SBU)

0

10

KM

headquarters

Black Sea

GRAPHIC NEWS, SOURCES: INSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY OF WAR, MAXAR TECHNOLOGIES; REUTERS

A U.S. official said a miles-long armoured column bearing down on the capital Kyiv had not made any advances in the past 24 hours, frozen in place by logistics problems, short on fuel and food, and perhaps pausing to reassess tactics.

- Reuters


5:45 p.m. ET

Canadians should brace for economic collateral damage as sanctions mount, Chrystia Freeland says

Canada will expand its Russia sanctions to target more Putin-friendly oligarchs and businesses, but Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland warns Canadians there will be an economic price for these punitive measures in support of Ukraine.

“I have to be honest with Canadians that there could be some collateral damage in Canada,” Ms. Freeland told reporters Tuesday.

She said she discussed this with Group of Seven finance ministers Tuesday. “We said in order to be really be effective, in order to really have an impact, we are going to have to be prepared for there to be some adverse consequences for our own economies.”

- Robert Fife and Steven Chase in Ottawa


4:20 p.m. ET

For Moldova, welcoming Ukrainians combines kindness with economic self-interest

For three decades, one of Europe’s poorest countries has been emptying out: More than a million people have departed Moldova since 1991. They’re still leaving, at a pace of 35,000 a year. Across the country, 100,000 homes stand empty.

Now, Ukrainian refugees are pouring into Moldova – more than 88,000 so far – and its government and companies are scrambling to give them chances to work through acts of charity that coincide with a national need for labour.

The government is sweeping away legal barriers to their employment and opening its classrooms to Ukrainian teachers. Meanwhile, companies are offering jobs as graphic designers, office managers, construction workers, restaurant staff and IT workers.

But the tide of people also represents an economic opportunity to bring skills into a country that has struggled to keep its most talented at home.

- Nathan VanderKlippe in Moldova


4:15 p.m. ET

No-fly zone over Ukraine out of the question for NATO

NATO countries are not considering imposing a no-fly zone over Ukraine, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said despite a plea from Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky that it would limit the number of people who die.

Mr. Johnson ruled out a no-fly zone while speaking at a news conference at Estonia’s Tapa military base on Tuesday, where British troops are leading the NATO battle group stationed there. The news came as Russian military aggression is expected to increase and after reports that Russia is indiscriminately bombing civilian areas.

“When it comes to a no fly-zone … in the skies above Ukraine, we have to accept the reality that, that involves shooting down Russian planes,” Mr. Johnson said. “That is a very, very big step that is simply not on the agenda of any NATO country.”

- Marieke Walsh in Estonia


3:15 p.m. ET

World Court to hear Ukraine and Russia case on March 7-8

The World Court on Tuesday said it will hold hearings on March 7-8 on whether to order “provisional measures” in a lawsuit brought by Ukraine against Russia seeking a halt to Moscow’s military actions in Ukraine.

The UN court said in a statement it had sent Russia an urgent communication to prepare in case it does order provisional measures, or immediate steps, to protect Ukraine, as it has requested.

The court, formally known as the International Court of Justice, is the United Nations’ venue for resolving disputes between states.

Ukraine’s lawsuit filed on Sunday argues that Russia’s claim it invaded Ukraine to prevent a genocide is false.

Ukraine’s President Volodymyr Zelenskiy said on Sunday that he had filed the lawsuit at the court over genocide accusations made by Moscow.

Russian President Vladimir Putin had repeatedly asserted that Ukraine committed “genocide” in the Donbass region of eastern Ukraine, without presenting evidence, and said the invasion, called a “special operation” by Russian officials, was therefore justified to end it.

- Reuters


2:15 p.m. ET

U.K. imposes sanctions on Belarusian figures

Britain said on Tuesday it had imposed sanctions against Belarusian individuals and organisations over the country’s role in facilitating the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

Four defence officials, including the Belarus Chief of the General Staff and First Deputy Minister of Defence Major General Victor Gulevich, and two military enterprises have been included, the British Foreign Office said.

- Reuters


1:15 p.m. ET

Russian ships banned from Canadian waters

Ottawa is banning Russian-owned and registered ships from Canadian ports and waters.

Transport Minister Omar Alghabra said Tuesday that the ban will take effect later this week through orders under Canada’s Special Economic Measures Act.

“We are taking steps to close Canadian ports and internal waters to Russian-owned or registered ships. The Government of Canada condemns Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, and we will continue to take action to stand with Ukraine,” he said in a statement.

- Robert Fife and Steven Chase in Ottawa


12:10 p.m. ET

Russians queue at ATMs amid financial sanctions

People wait to use an ATM outside a Sberbank location in Moscow, Feb. 28, 2022.Sergey Ponomarev/The New York Times News Service

Moscow residents stood in long queues for ATMs on Tuesday as Western sanctions over Russia’s invasion of Ukraine hit residents on the street.

As France declared an “all-out economic and financial war” against the country on Tuesday to bring down its economy - before French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire rowed back on language he later said was inappropriate.

People rushed to withdraw cash after the Russian ruble hit record lows, losing a third of its value so far this year. Some expressed concerns that the Russian government would freeze their currency savings.

- Reuters


12:00 p.m. ET

Beijing offers to play role in ending attack on Ukraine amid international criticism for appearing to stand by Russia

Chinese foreign ministry Wang Yi spoke with his Ukrainian counterpart Tuesday, offering to play a role in ending the conflict as Beijing faces international criticism for appearing to stand by Russia following the invasion.

Ukraine said foreign minister Dmytro Kuleba had pushed Mr. Wang to pressure Russia to stop the war. The Chinese readout said Kiev “is willing to strengthen communication with China and looks forward to China’s mediation to achieve a ceasefire.”

Beijing previously called for a diplomatic end to the conflict but stopped short of criticizing Moscow, with foreign ministry officials even unwilling to call the operation launched by Russia an “invasion.” This, as well as a show of unity by President Xi Jinping and Russian leader Vladimir Putin in early February, had been seen by many as proof the war had China’s tacit approval.

- James Griffiths in Hong Kong


11:45 a.m. ET

Ukraine says five people killed in Russian attack on Kyiv TV tower

Several Russian weapons struck the television and radio transmission tower near the middle of Kyiv on March 1, with other blasts nearby. Ukrainian emergency services said the attack killed five people.

The Globe and Mail

Video showed the television building rocked by explosion. Footage released by Ukraine’s emergency services showed firefighters battling the blaze in the aftermath.

Russia’s defense ministry said its forces would strike targets in Kyiv used by Ukraine’s security service and also communications sites. It warned residents near such sites to leave their homes, while giving no information about where in the city of three million people those targets were located.

- Reuters


11:20 a.m. ET

Canada to help Ukraine expedite petition to probe alleged war crimes by Russian force

Canada says it’s going to help Ukraine expedite its petition to the International Criminal Court to probe alleged war crimes and crimes against humanity committed by Russian forces, Foreign Affairs Minister Mélanie Joly says.

International Criminal Court (ICC) prosecutor Karim Khan has said he has decided to open an investigation and said the next step is to seek authorization from the court to proceed. But in a statement this week he signalled an alternative route that could speed up the process would be for a member state to refer the matter to his office.

Ms. Joly, in Geneva Tuesday, told reporters Canada will take this on. “Canada will petition the International Criminal Court … against Russia for crimes against humanity and war crimes. And it was also important for us to show that we are steadfast in terms of our support to Ukraine.”

- Steven Chase in Ottawa


10:57 a.m. ET

Former German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder loses entire staff after refusing to resign from Russian energy company boards

The entire staff of Gerhard Schroeder, the former German chancellor who is close to Russian President Vladimir Putin and an advocate of increasing Russian natural gas exports to Germany, has resigned in protest over his ties to the Kremlin.

The employees quit because they were embarrassed by Mr. Schroeder’s prominent roles at three Russian gas and pipeline companies, according to German media reports.

Those roles had enraged many Germans even before Mr. Putin invaded Ukraine last week. Some of his critics noted that Mr. Schroeder’s income ultimately came from a regime – the Russian government – that had launched an illegal and senseless war, in their view.

- Eric Reguly in Rome



10:18 a.m. ET

Boris Johnson says British forces will not fight Russian forces in Ukraine

Prime Minister Boris Johnson said on Tuesday British troops would not fight Russian forces in Ukraine, and that recent reinforcements were firmly within the borders of NATO members.

“These are nothing more than defensive measures, which have been the essence of NATO for more than 70 years,” he said during a visit to Estonia where Britain has deployed more troops.

“I want to be crystal clear finally, on that point, we will not fight Russian forces in Ukraine and our reinforcements like these reinforcements here in Tapa are firmly within the borders of NATO members and they are profoundly the right thing to do.”

-Reuters


9:47 a.m. ET

Missile strikes administration building in Kharkiv, Ukraine

At least 10 people were killed and 35 wounded in rocket strikes by Russian forces on Kharkiv, Ukraine, according to an Interior Ministry official. Officials say that Russian missile attacks hit the centre of the city, including residential areas and the city administration building.

The Globe and Mail


9:36 a.m. ET

U.K. relaxes visa rules for Ukrainian refugees

Prime Minister Boris Johnson about the growing humanitarian crisis caused by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, saying refugee numbers could reach millions, with possibly more than 200,000 coming to Britain to join family members.

Poland has estimated that about 350,000 people have crossed its border from Ukraine since last Thursday, while the European Union has emphasized the need to prepare for millions of refugees entering the bloc.

– Reuters


9:20 a.m. ET

Chinese trapped in Ukraine criticize embassy’s conflicting advice as Russian attack began

A visitor to a Ukraine restaurant holds together the Chinese and Ukraine national flags on Thursday, Feb. 24, 2022, in Beijing.Ng Han Guan/The Associated Press

The woman’s voice cracked as she begged for help.

“I’m really scared,” she told the Chinese embassy in Kyiv over the phone. “I called you guys over and over and over again, and really, I am freaking out.”

A recording of the call – which cannot be independently verified by The Globe – was posted to social platform Weibo late Monday. It was viewed more than 1.5 million times in the 20 hours or so the video was online, a sign of the growing frustration many Chinese in Ukraine feel about the conflicting and limited advice they have received from Beijing’s representatives in the war-torn country.

“Before the war began, some people said repeatedly that evacuations were arranged, and some were hesitant to leave at first, but the embassy did not give any response,” read a post on Weibo accompanying the video.

- James Griffiths in Hong Kong


9:07 a.m. ET

Ukraine asks Germany to help close skies to stop Russian strikes on cities

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky said he had asked German Chancellor Olaf Scholz on Tuesday to help close the skies over Ukraine to halt the shelling of civilians by Russia.

“Had a phone conversation with Chancellor Scholz. Spoke about Russia’s shelling of residential neighbourhoods in Ukrainian cities during peace talks. Emphasized the need to close the sky over Ukraine,” Zelensky said.

He also told Scholz to move swiftly on Ukraine’s EU membership bid.


8:58 a.m. ET

Second round of talks to be held March 2, Russian news agency reports

The second round of Russia-Ukraine talks is planned for March 2, Russia’s TASS news agency reported on Tuesday, quoting a source on the Russian side.

After the first round of negotiations which took place on Monday and produced no tangible results, the sides had said they would meet again in the coming days.

- Reuters


8:40 a.m. ET

Maersk to temporarily halt all container shipping to and from Russia

Shipping giant Maersk will temporarily halt all container shipping to and from Russia, deepening the country’s isolation as its invasion of Ukraine sparks an exodus of Western companies.

The West has imposed heavy restrictions on Russia to close off its economy and block it from the global financial system, effectively making it “uninvestable” and encouraging companies to halt sales, cut ties and dump tens of billions of dollars worth of investments.

- Reuters


8:35 a.m. ET

Children’s hospital pleads for evacuation of cancer patients as Russians surround Chernihiv

Children and their families are trapped in the cancer ward of the main hospital of the besieged Ukrainian city of Chernihiv.Serhiy Zosimenko/Handout

The kids being treated for cancer at the Chernihiv Regional Children’s Hospital are running out of hope.

The northern Ukrainian city is now surrounded by the Russian army on all sides, residents say, and the remaining routes have been mined. On Tuesday, Ukraine’s Parliament said Belarusian troops had entered the country and joined the Russian attack on the northern city of Chernihiv.

The situation is dire for all 285,000 residents of the city, which sits just 70 kilometres from the Belarusian border. But it’s particularly grim for the 11 children stuck in the local oncology ward, as food and medicines become increasingly scarce. “We actually don’t know how to survive here, It’s unreal. We don’t have any more resources,,” said Serhiy Zasimenko, the head of Evum, a non-governmental organization that supports the children’s oncology ward. “They’re in tough condition and need evacuation.”

- Mark MacKinnon in Ukraine


8:26 a.m. ET

Ukraine asks China to make Russia stop war: foreign ministry

Ukraine’s Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba asked his Chinese counterpart in a phone call on Tuesday to use Beijing’s ties with Moscow to stop Russia’s military invasion of its neighbour, the Ukrainian foreign ministry said in a statement.

According to the statement, China’s Foreign Minister Wang Yi told Kuleba Beijing was ready to make every effort to help end the war through diplomacy.

- Reuters


7:51 a.m. ET

Stocks slide on Ukraine uncertainty, crude back above US$100

European stocks sagged and oil jumped back above US$100 a barrel on Tuesday as markets struggled with massive uncertainty caused by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, although the ruble steadied as Moscow scrambled support for its beleaguered markets.

Russia’s stock markets remained suspended and some bond trading platforms were no longer showing prices, but dealing in the major financial centres both in Europe and in Asia overnight was orderly, albeit jittery.

Losses for the Pan-European STOXX 600 were starting to mount again, with the index down nearly 2% by midsession and Wall Street expected to open around 1% lower in New York later.

- Reuters


7:38 a.m. ET

SWIFT says it is waiting for names of Russian banks to disconnect

SWIFT said on Tuesday it was waiting to see which banks authorities want disconnected from its global financial messaging system as sanctions in response to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine are rolled out.

“We will always comply with applicable sanctions laws,” SWIFT said in a statement on Tuesday.

“We are engaging with these authorities to understand which entities will be subject to these new measures and will disconnect them once we receive legal instruction to do so.”

- Reuters


7:23 a.m. ET

Canada to petition ICC to probe alleged Russian war crimes

Canada will petition the International Criminal Court (ICC) on Tuesday to probe alleged war crimes and crimes against humanity by Russian forces in Ukraine, its Foreign Minister Melanie Joly said.

The office of the ICC prosecutor on Monday said it will seek court approval to open an investigation into alleged war crimes in Ukraine, just days after Russia’s invasion of its neighbour.

Joly, speaking to reporters in Geneva after taking part in a walkout of a virtual speech by Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov to the U.N. Human Rights Council, said: “Today also Canada will petition the International Criminal Court … against Russia for crimes against humanity and war crimes. And it was also important for us to show that we are steadfast in terms of our support to Ukraine”.

-Reuters


7:05 a.m. ET

Red Cross appeals for aid amid ‘deteriorating’ humanitarian situation in Ukraine

Red Cross agencies appealed on Tuesday for US$273-million to provide food, water and shelter to millions of people in Ukraine where the humanitarian situation is “deteriorating rapidly” and to those who have fled abroad.

The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and the International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies – the world’s largest disaster relief network – issued the joint appeal as a huge Russian armoured column bore down on Kyiv, six days after Moscow’s invasion began.

“We need the funds in order to address the humanitarian needs which are already staggering – food, water, shelter, health care, psychological support – and they are growing by the hour,” Martin Schuepp, ICRC regional director for Europe and Central Asia, told a news briefing.


6:45 a.m. ET

For Ukrainian refugees in Poland, hope lives at the humble Marko Hotel

At any other time, the Hotel Marko would barely rate a glimpse from travellers as they sped along the highway outside Przemysl, which leads to Poland’s border with Ukraine.

The two-storey hotel is easy to miss despite its bright yellow walls and turret motif. It sits behind an empty furniture store and a deserted restaurant, both closed because of the pandemic.

The Marko’s 15 rooms – painted either green or white – offer few amenities for its three-star rating beyond a table, a couple of chairs, a television and a kettle.

There’s a broken fridge in the lobby selling warm soft drinks, and a rack of postcards featuring pictures of local attractions.

But ever since Russian bombs began pounding Ukraine last week, the Marko has become a haven for Ukrainians fleeing the war and something of a symbol of Polish generosity.

- Paul Waldie in Poland


6:40 a.m. ET

Russia to temporarily ban foreigners from selling assets

Russia will impose temporary curbs on foreign investors seeking to exit Russian assets to ensure they take a considered decision not one driven by political pressure, the prime minister said on Tuesday, as Moscow responds to Western sanctions.

“In the current sanction situation foreign entrepreneurs are forced to be guided, not by economic factors, but to make decisions under political pressure,” Prime Minister Mikhail Mishustin told a governmental meeting.

“In order to give business a chance to make a considered decision, a presidential order was prepared to impose temporary curbs on exit from Russian assets,” he said.

Mishustin did not provide details.


6:35 a.m. ET

Russia reinstates slowdown of Twitter traffic

Russia’s state communications regulator said on it had reinstated a slowdown of Twitter’s traffic on desktop computers due to what it said were fake posts about Russia’s “special operation” in Ukraine, the Interfax news agency reported.

The regulator, Roskomnadzor, which was already restricting traffic on mobile devices, said it had sent more than 1,700 requests to Twitter over more than 800 offending posts, and would only stop the slowdown once all content it deems illegal had been removed from the platform.


6:26 a.m. ET

U.K. passes law to ban Russian-linked ships from its ports

Britain said it had passed a law that would ban all ships that have any connection to Russia from entering its ports.

Britain had said on Monday that it wanted all ports to refuse entry to ships that were Russian flagged, registered or controlled while it drew up new legislation.

“We’ve just become the first nation to pass a law involving a total ban of all ships with any Russian connection whatsoever from entering British ports,”

-Reuters


6:17 a.m. ET

Russian forces mount new offensive

A day after a shelling attack on Ukraine’s second-largest city, Russian forces have mounted a major new offensive, shelling Mariupol, surrounding Kherson, killing dozens of soldiers in Okhtyrka, striking a government building in central Kharkiv with a missile and advancing on Kyiv with a 65-kilometre long military convoy that has reached the outskirts of the capital.

The Russian assault will not stop until Moscow’s goals “are achieved,” Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu said Tuesday as air raid sirens sounded across Ukraine, including in Kyiv. Russia has said its objectives include “demilitarizing” Ukraine.

Ukraine’s Parliament says Belarusian troops have now entered Ukraine, joining the Russian attack on the northern city of Chernihiv. A resident in the city told The Globe and Mail Chernihiv is now completely surrounded.

- Nathan VanderKlippe in Moldova and Mark MacKinnon in Ukraine


5:42 a.m. ET

EU, U.S., British envoys boycott Lavrov speech at UN rights forum

Dozens of diplomats from the European Union (EU), United States and Britain walked out of a speech by Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov to the top U.N. human rights forum on Tuesday, according to a Reuters witness.

Lavrov was addressing the U.N. Human Rights Council remotely, having cancelled his attendance earlier due to what the Russian mission in Geneva said on Monday were EU states blocking his flight path.


5:38 a.m. ET

YouTube to block channels linked to Russia’s RT and Sputnik across Europe

YouTube is blocking channels connected to Russian state-backed media outlets RT and Sputnik across Europe effective immediately, the company operated by Alphabet Inc’s Google, said on Tuesday.

“It’ll take time for our systems to fully ramp up. Our teams continue to monitor the situation around the clock to take swift action,” a YouTube spokesperson said in a statement.

The company’s actions follows that of Facebook parent Meta Platforms Inc, which on Monday said it will restrict access to television network RT and news agency Sputnik on its platforms across the European Union.


5:26 a.m. ET

EU lawmakers to call Russia a ‘rogue state’ at emergency session with Zelensky

EU lawmakers will call Russia a “rogue state” and urge the 27-nation bloc to agree even tougher sanctions, in an emergency debate on the war on Tuesday during which Ukraine’s President Volodymyr Zelensky will address lawmakers via video-link.

According to a draft resolution backed by the assembly’s main parties, lawmakers will call for the scope of sanctions to be broadened and “aimed at strategically weakening the Russian economy and industrial base, in particular the military-industrial complex.”

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine “effectively makes Russia a rogue state,” the lawmakers are set to say.

-Reuters


5:56 a.m. ET

Lukashenko says Belarus deploying more forces to Ukraine border

Belarus is deploying more forces on its border with Ukraine, state news agency Belta quoted Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko as saying on Tuesday.

“Those are well trained rapid deployment groups which are ready to stop any provocation and any military action against Belarus,” Lukashenko said.

-Reuters


5:15 a.m. ET

Over 660,000 people flee Ukraine, UN agency says

More than 660,000 people, mostly women and children, have fled Ukraine to neighbouring countries in the last six days since Russia invaded, the U.N. refugee agency said on Tuesday.

Shabia Mantoo, spokesperson of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), told a briefing in Geneva there were reports of people waiting for up to 60 hours to enter Poland, while queues at the Romanian border are up to 20 km long.

-Reuters


4:58 a.m. ET

Ukraine’s banking system is running smoothly, say central bank

Ukraine’s banking system is running smoothly and banks are replenishing cash machines where possible, central bank governor Kyrylo Shevchenko said in a statement on Tuesday.

Online banking is operating as usual, allowing non-cash transfers including to the army, he said.

-Reuters


4:53 a.m. ET

German warplanes patrolling skies over Poland, air force says

German warplanes are flying armed air patrols in the skies over Poland, the German air force said on Tuesday.

“Safeguarding the skies over Poland,” the air force said on Twitter, above a picture of a starting fighter jet, without giving details.

A military spokesperson told Reuters the Eurofighter jets were flying missions out of Germany over Poland, a country that suffered severely under Nazi Germany in the last century.

Germany is also refuelling Allied jets over Romania with an A400M tanker and supporting a multinational refuelling mission over Poland, according to the spokesperson, on top of having deployed six Eurofighters to Romania where they fly armed air patrols for NATO.

-Reuters


4:39 a.m. ET

Russian forces laying siege to Kyiv and Kharkiv, says Ukrainian official

Ukrainian presidential advisor Oleksiy Arestovych said Russian forces were trying to lay siege to Kyiv and the northeastern city Kharkiv, Ukraine’s second-largest.

Russian troops fired artillery at Kyiv, Kharkiv and the southern port city of Mariupol overnight while the Ukrainian side shot down Russian military planes around the capital, Arestovych said in a televised briefing.

He described the current situation as under control.

-Reuters


3:42 a.m. ET

Pussy Riot turns to NFTs to support Ukraine

The activist punk band Pussy Riot has put 10,000 NFTs of the Ukrainian flag on sale, with proceeds going toward Ukrainian civilians.

Founding member Nadya Tolokonnikova says it’s a show of solidarity with the Ukrainian people.

Pussy Riot has spent over a decade protesting the Russian government. And Ukraine has served as Tolokonnikova’s second home over the years.

“Putin has completely lost it. He’s a dangerous dictator. And I believe that the world has to come together to stop him. It’s been something that I’ve been working on since 2007, spent two years in jail for that, been attacked multiple times. I have been thrown chemical liquid in my face. I’ve been whipped. And I really believe that we can use some help of the whole world to stop this dangerous man.”

-Reuters


3:23 a.m. ET

Skaters from Russia, Belarus banned from international events

The International Skating Union said on Tuesday that competitors from Russia and Belarus will not be allowed to take part in its international events until further notice.

The move comes a day after the International Olympic Committee recommended that sports federations ban Russian and Belarusian athletes and officials from taking part in events following the invasion, which Russia says is a “special operation”.

The decision is the latest blow to figure skating in Russia after the controversy surrounding 15-year-old sensation Kamila Valieva at the Beijing Winter Olympics.

The international volleyball federation also said it had stripped Russia of the men’s world championship scheduled to be held in August and September.

-Reuters


3:10 a.m. ET

Russian missiles hit city administration, residential areas, Kharkiv official says

Kharkiv region head Oleg Synegubov said on Tuesday Russian missile attacks hit the centre of Ukraine’s second-largest city, including residential areas and the city administration building, as Moscow started day six of its invasion.

Synegubov said Russia launched GRAD and cruise missiles on Kharkiv but that the city defence was holding. “Such attacks are genocide of the Ukrainian people, a war crime against the civilian population,” he said.

Wearing a flak jacket and a helmet, Synegubov said in a video posted on social media Tuesday morning that it was too early to know the number of casualties.

He shared a video showing Kharkiv regional administration building being hit by a missile and exploding.

Reuters was not immediately able to verify that video independently.

Russia calls its actions in Ukraine a “special operation” that it says is not designed to occupy territory but to destroy its southern neighbour’s military capabilities and capture what it regards as dangerous nationalists.

-Reuters


2:00 a.m. ET

Taiwan sends medical supplies to help Ukraine

Taiwan says it sent 27 tons worth of medical supplies to Ukraine via a flight to Germany late Monday.

Foreign Affairs Ministry spokesperson Joanne Ou told reporters Tuesday that Taiwan was happy to assist as “a responsible member of the international community, and a member of the democratic camp.”

Taiwan has strongly condemned Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and had said it would impose economic sanctions against Russia. It has yet to reveal what those sanctions were, but the island is a dominant manufacturer of semiconductor chips, which are crucial to tech products ranging from smartphones to cars.

-AP


1:40 a.m. ET

Around 350,000 refugees have entered Poland from Ukraine, says deputy minister

WARSAW - Around 350,000 people have entered Poland from Ukraine since Russia invaded the country, a Polish deputy interior minister said on Tuesday.

“Over the last 24 hours 100,000 people crossed the Polish-Ukrainian border,” Maciej Wasik told public broadcaster Polskie Radio 1. “In total, since Thursday, there have already been 350,000 refugees.”

-Reuters


10:07 p.m. ET

‘The shocking becomes normal in a war zone’

The Globe’s correspondent Mark MacKinnon, who has been covering Kyiv for nearly two decades, shares his experience of having to flee Kyiv as fighter jets screamed overhead and artillery erupted close by.

Monday morning began with hope. For the first time in days it had been possible to have a near-decent night’s sleep at our safe house on the edge of Kyiv. There had been “only” four explosions during the night, my colleagues informed me, and I had slept through three of them. It’s amazing how fast the shocking becomes normal in a war zone.

Mark MacKinnon

Your Globe

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