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Duduzane Zuma appears at the Specialised Commercial Crimes Court in Johannesburg, South Africa, Jan. 24, 2019.

SIPHIWE SIBEKO/Reuters

South African prosecutors on Thursday provisionally withdrew corruption charges against Duduzane Zuma, the son of former president Jacob Zuma.

Duduzane Zuma faced charges of corruption and conspiracy to commit corruption related to his dealings with the Guptas, three Indian-born brothers accused of using their relationship with former president Zuma to win state contracts.

The Guptas and Zumas deny wrongdoing.

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Zuma appeared in the Specialised Commercial Crime Court in Johannesburg which confirmed that the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) had withdrawn the case pending further evidence.

The NPA’s failure to build a case against Duduzane Zuma is a setback for its promised fight against graft.

Jacob Zuma’s successor, Cyril Ramaphosa, has staked his reputation on rooting out corruption since becoming president in February.

The Guptas have denied there was anything untoward in their relationship with former president Zuma, but their ties are being investigated in an inquiry that could take months, or even years, to be concluded.

The Guptas’ whereabouts are not publicly known.

Duduzane was also due to appear at Randburg Magistrate’s Court in Johannesburg in March to face charges of culpable homicide over a fatal car crash in 2014, when his Porsche 911 collided with a minivan taxi, killing one woman and seriously injuring another who later died in hospital.

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