Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Support Quality Journalism.
The Globe and Mail
First Access to Latest
Investment News
Collection of curated
e-books and guides
Inform your decisions via
Globe Investor Tools
Just$1.99
per week
for first 24 weeks

Enjoy unlimited digital access
Enjoy Unlimited Digital Access
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){window.requestAnimationFrame(function() {var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))});}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1); // via darwin-bg var slideIndex = 0; carousel(); function carousel() { var i; var x = document.getElementsByClassName("subs_valueprop"); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } slideIndex++; if (slideIndex> x.length) { slideIndex = 1; } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; setTimeout(carousel, 2500); } //

In an undated image provided by the National Hurricane Center, a two-day tropical weather graphic of Hurricane Arthur.

NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER/The New York Times News Service

Tropical Storm Arthur moved out to sea Monday after dumping heavy rain on North Carolina as forecasters warned that the first named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season could continue to whip dangerous surf and rip currents for another day or more along the U.S. East Coast.

The storm represented another early start for the Atlantic hurricane season. Arthur formed Saturday in waters off Florida, marking the sixth straight year that a named storm has developed before June 1.

By late Monday, storm watches and warnings that had been in effect for parts of the North Carolina coast were cancelled.

Story continues below advertisement

As Arthur’s centre passed off North Carolina earlier in the day, a pocket along the coast that includes Newport and Havelock recorded more than 4 inches (10 cm) of rain, according to the National Weather Service. Other areas along the coast saw 2 inches (5 cm) or more, causing some secondary roads to flood. Wind gusts of 40 mph or more (64 kph) were recorded in at least two places on the Outer Banks, the weather service said.

The Hurricane Center said Arthur was moving northeast at 16 mph (26 kph) Monday afternoon as its centre pulled away from the U.S. mainland.

At 5 p.m. EDT, the storm’s centre was located about 110 miles (175 kilometres) northeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Arthur had top sustained winds of 50 mph (85 kph).

Forecasters said Arthur could strengthen some as it moves away from land, but was likely to lose its tropical storm characteristics later Monday or Tuesday.

North Carolina Emergency Management Director Mike Sprayberry said that overwash or standing water had closed a highway on the Outer Banks and another on the mainland. Other secondary roads had flooded. Otherwise, he said conditions were stable and that no other serious problems had been reported to the state.

Still, he warned that surf conditions will remain dangerous and advised people to be cautious around the water even as the storm pushes out to sea.

“People in the eastern part of our state should remain cautious, especially while driving in areas where water may collect on roads,” he said at a news conference. “Today is not the day to take risks at the beach or in the surf.”

Story continues below advertisement

Forecasters said rough surf could continue for another day or two.

While other pre-June storms may be influenced by warming waters and climate change, Arthur is more of a subtropical system than a traditional named storm, said Colorado State University hurricane researcher Phil Klotzbach, who added that its water is cooler than what’s usually needed for storm formation.

A lot of these out-of-season storms are weak ones that meteorologists can detect because of satellites and other technology, but comparable storms would have been missed in an earlier era, Klotzbach said.

Our Morning Update and Evening Update newsletters are written by Globe editors, giving you a concise summary of the day’s most important headlines. Sign up today.

Your Globe

Build your personal news feed

  1. Follow topics and authors relevant to your reading interests.
  2. Check your Following feed daily, and never miss an article. Access your Following feed from your account menu at the top right corner of every page.

Follow topics related to this article:

View more suggestions in Following Read more about following topics and authors
Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies