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WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange leaves Westminster Magistrates Court, in London, in a Jan. 13, 2020, file photo.

Simon Dawson/Reuters

Julian Assange tried to contact Hillary Clinton and the White House when he realized that unredacted U.S. diplomatic cables given to WikiLeaks were about to be dumped on the internet, his lawyer told his London extradition hearing on Tuesday.

Mr. Assange is being sought by the United States on 18 counts of hacking U.S. government computers and an espionage offence, having allegedly conspired with Chelsea Manning, then a U.S. soldier known as Bradley Manning, to leak hundreds of thousands of secret documents by WikiLeaks almost a decade ago.

On Monday, the lawyer representing the United States told the hearing that Mr. Assange, 48, was wanted for crimes that had endangered people in Iraq, Iran and Afghanistan who had helped the West, some of whom later disappeared.

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U.S. authorities say his actions in recklessly publishing unredacted classified diplomatic cables put informants, dissidents, journalists and human rights activists at risk of torture, abuse or death.

Outlining part of his defence, Mr. Assange’s lawyer Mark Summers said allegations that he had helped Ms. Manning to break a government password, had encouraged the theft of secret data and knowingly put lives in danger were “lies, lies and more lies.”

He told London’s Woolwich Crown Court that WikiLeaks had received documents from Ms. Manning in April, 2010. He then made a deal with a number of newspapers, including The New York Times, Britain’s The Guardian and Germany’s Der Spiegel, to begin releasing redacted parts of the 250,000 cables in November that year.

A witness from Der Spiegel said the U.S. State Department had been involved in suggesting redactions in conference calls, Mr. Summers said.

However, a password that allowed access to the full unredacted material was published in a book by Guardian reporters about WikiLeaks in February, 2011. In August, another German newspaper reported it had discovered the password and it had access to the archive.

A spokesman for The Guardian said the authors were told the password was temporary and the book contained no details about the whereabouts of the files.

PEOPLE’S LIVES ‘AT RISK’

Mr. Summers said Mr. Assange attempted to warn the U.S. government, calling the White House and attempting to speak to then-secretary of state Ms. Clinton, saying, “unless we do something, people’s lives are put at risk.”

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Mr. Summers said the State Department had responded by suggesting that Mr. Assange call back “in a couple of hours.”

The United States asked Britain to extradite Mr. Assange last year after he was pulled from the Ecuador embassy in London, where he had spent seven years holed up avoiding extradition to Sweden over sex-crime allegations, which have since been dropped.

Mr. Assange has served a prison sentence in Britain for skipping bail and remains jailed pending the U.S. extradition request.

Supporters hail Mr. Assange as an anti-establishment hero who revealed governments’ abuses of power, and argue the action against him is a dangerous infringement of journalists’ rights. Critics cast him as a dangerous enemy of the state who has undermined Western security.

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