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Agnes Callamard, UN special rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions, and Hatice Cengiz, the fiancée of murdered journalist Jamal Khashoggi, hold a news conference in Brussels, Belgium, on Dec. 3, 2019.

FRANCOIS LENOIR/Reuters

The world has not done enough to ensure justice is done over the killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, a special UN investigator said on Tuesday.

Agnès Callamard, the United Nations rapporteur for extrajudicial executions, called for more action from the European Union and the United States over Mr. Khashoggi’s murder by Saudi operatives at Riyadh’s consulate in Istanbul in 2018.

“I think it is important to recognize that the international community so far has failed in its duty to ensure that there cannot be immunity or impunity for the killing of Jamal Khashoggi,” Ms. Callamard told reporters in Brussels.

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Ms. Callamard is seeking an international criminal investigation instead of a Saudi trial, but Riyadh has rejected her request. Hatice Cengiz, who had been due to marry Mr. Khashoggi, accompanied Ms. Callamard on a trip to Brussels which she said was intended to remind people they were still seeking justice.

Mr. Khashoggi was a U.S. resident and a critic of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. Eleven Saudi suspects have been put on trial over his death in secretive proceedings. A report by Ms. Callamard has called for the Crown Prince and other senior Saudi officials to be investigated.

The death caused a global uproar, tarnishing the crown prince’s image. The U.S. Central Intelligence Agency and some Western governments have said they believe Prince Mohammed ordered the killing, but Saudi officials say he had no role.

The EU called on the first anniversary of Mr. Khashoggi’s killing for “full accountability for all those responsible” and said there must be a “credible and transparent” investigation.

The United States has called for Saudi Arabia to show tangible progress towards holding those behind the killing to account.

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