Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Support Quality Journalism.
The Globe and Mail
First Access to Latest
Investment News
Collection of curated
e-books and guides
Inform your decisions via
Globe Investor Tools
Just$1.99
per week
for first 24 weeks

Enjoy unlimited digital access
Cancel Anytime
Enjoy Unlimited Digital Access
Canada’s most-awarded
newsroom for a reason
Stay informed for a
lot less, cancel anytime
“Exemplary reporting on
COVID-19” – Herman L
$1.99
per week
for 24 weeks
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Just $1.99per week for the first 24weeks
Just $1.99per week for the first 24weeks
var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){window.requestAnimationFrame(function() {var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))});}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1); // via darwin-bg var slideIndex = 0; carousel(); function carousel() { var i; var x = document.getElementsByClassName("subs_valueprop"); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } slideIndex++; if (slideIndex> x.length) { slideIndex = 1; } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; setTimeout(carousel, 2500); } //

Ukraine accused the Kremlin on Monday of ignoring its request for talks between the two countries’ presidents over a buildup of Russian troops near its border, but Moscow said its soldiers were on its own territory, unlike U.S. forces in the region.

Kyiv and Moscow have traded blame over the worsening situation in the eastern Donbass region, where Ukrainian troops have battled Russian-backed forces in a conflict Kyiv says has killed 14,000 people since 2014.

The West has expressed concern in recent weeks over a huge buildup of Russian forces close to Ukraine’s eastern border and in Crimea, which Russia annexed from Kyiv in 2014.

Story continues below advertisement

The U.S. State Department said on Monday that Secretary of State Antony Blinken and NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg had discussed “the immediate need for Russia to cease its aggressive military buildup.”

Foreign ministers from the G7 group of nations, including the United States, Britain and France, have condemned an increase in Russian troop numbers near its border with Ukraine and in Crimea, annexed by Russia in 2014.

“These large-scale troop movements, without prior notification, represent threatening and destabilizing activities,” the joint statement released by Britain’s foreign ministry said.

Russia has said it moves its forces around as it sees fit, including for defensive purposes.

Iuliia Mendel, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky’s spokeswoman, told Reuters on Monday the leader had tried and so far failed to speak to Putin about the matter.

“The president’s office, of course, made a request to speak with Vladimir Putin. We have not received an answer yet and we very much hope that this is not a refusal of dialogue,” said Mendel.

Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said he had not seen such a request for talks “in recent days” and was unaware one had been recently made.

Story continues below advertisement

When asked if Putin had anything to say to Zelensky, Peskov said he hoped “political wisdom” would prevail in Kyiv when it came to de-escalating and avoiding a potential war.

Mendel said Russia had more than 40,000 troops deployed on Ukraine’s eastern border and more than 40,000 troops in Crimea, and that around 50,000 of all those soldiers were new deployments.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, on a visit to Egypt, said Washington, not Moscow, had questions to answer about its activities in and around Ukraine.

“Questions are being asked about what Russia is doing on the border with Ukraine,” said Lavrov. “The answer is very simple. We live there, it’s our country. But what is the United States doing thousands of kilometres from its own territory with its warships and troops in Ukraine?”

Turkey said on Friday that Washington, which has provided arms to Ukraine, would send two warships to the Black Sea this week. The Pentagon declined to discuss Turkey’s comments but said the military routinely sends ships to the region.

Zelensky held talks in Istanbul on Saturday with Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan who said that the developments in eastern Ukraine were worrying.

Story continues below advertisement

Lavrov on Monday told Turkey and other “responsible” nations not to feed what he described as “belligerent sentiment” in Ukraine.

The standoff has sparked concern from Ukraine’s Western backers. Washington has accused Russia of a “provocative” buildup.

Zelensky has spoken of the need for NATO to admit Ukraine, a step Russia, citing its own security concerns, opposes.

Our Morning Update and Evening Update newsletters are written by Globe editors, giving you a concise summary of the day’s most important headlines. Sign up today.

Your Globe

Build your personal news feed

  1. Follow topics and authors relevant to your reading interests.
  2. Check your Following feed daily, and never miss an article. Access your Following feed from your account menu at the top right corner of every page.

Follow topics related to this article:

View more suggestions in Following Read more about following topics and authors
Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies