Skip to main content

New Years traditions around the world are sometimes fun, often spiritual and occasionally superstitious. Many involve water.

Open this photo in gallery:

A member of the Cryophile winter swimmers' club, walks into the Yenisei River in -26C temperature to mark the New Year and Christmas season iin Krasnoyarsk, Russia.ILYA NAYMUSHIN/Reuters

1 of 10
Open this photo in gallery:

Monks cover worshippers lying in coffins at the Takien temple in Bangkok, Thailand. The coffin ceremony symbolizes death and rebirth.Sakchai Lalit/The Associated Press

2 of 10
Open this photo in gallery:

A man drives by "Old Year dolls" for sale in Rionegro, Colombia. Burning "Old Year dolls" is one of the most traditional superstitions in Colombian popular culture.JOAQUIN SARMIENTO/AFP/Getty Images

3 of 10
Open this photo in gallery:

People strike a huge traditional bell to mark the New Year in central Seoul.JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images

4 of 10
Open this photo in gallery:

A man wades into the ocean with offerings for Yemanja, goddess of the sea, during a New Year's ceremony in Rio de Janeiro.Leo Correa/The Associated Press

5 of 10
Open this photo in gallery:

People jointhe Edinburgh's Hogmanay torchlit procession down the Royal Mile in Scotland.RUSSELL CHEYNE/Reuters

6 of 10
Open this photo in gallery:

People take part in a traditional sea bath to mark the New Year iin Le Cap d'Agde, southern France.PASCAL GUYOT/AFP/Getty Images

7 of 10
Open this photo in gallery:

Workers carry slaughtered pigs to be roasted for New Year celebrations in Manila, Philippines.ELOISA LOPEZ/Reuters

8 of 10
Open this photo in gallery:

People participate in the annual New Year's dip in the harbour of Copenhagen.Bax Lindhardt/Reuters

9 of 10
Open this photo in gallery:

A Palestinian horseman rides on the beach prior to the New Year's celebrations in Gaza city.MAHMUD HAMS/AFP/Getty Images

10 of 10

Interact with The Globe