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Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger speaks during a news conference in Atlanta, on Dec. 14, 2020.

John Bazemore/The Associated Press

Georgia’s top election official said on Monday that fellow Republican President Donald Trump had pushed him to take an “inappropriate” call in which he put pressure on the state to overturn his November presidential election defeat there.

In the call on Saturday, Mr. Trump told Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger to “find” enough votes to overturn his election loss in the southern state, according to a recording published by U.S. media.

“I never believed it was appropriate to speak to the President but he pushed out, I guess he had his staff push us. They wanted a call,” Mr. Raffensperger told ABC’s Good Morning America.

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Two Democratic members of Congress asked FBI director Christopher Wray on Monday to investigate the call.

“We believe Donald Trump engaged in solicitation of, or conspiracy to commit, a number of election crimes. We ask you to open an immediate criminal investigation into the president,” they said in a statement. The Justice Department had no comment on the request by Representatives Ted Lieu and Kathleen Rice.

U.S. President Donald Trump pressured Georgia’s top election official to 'find' enough votes to overturn his defeat in the southern state, according to a recording of the hour-long call first released by The Washington Post on Sunday. Reuters

A state Democrat has called for a probe into whether Mr. Trump had violated Georgia election law on the call. Mr. Raffensperger and his office’s general counsel rejected Mr. Trump’s assertions of electoral fraud in the hour-long conversation.

“We took the call, and we had a conversation. He did most of the talking, we did most of the listening,” Mr. Raffensperger said.

“But I do want to make my points that the data that he has is just plain wrong. He had hundreds and hundreds of people he said that were dead that voted. We found two. That’s an example of just his bad data.”

Mr. Trump for two months has been claiming contrary to evidence that his loss to Democratic president-elect Joe Biden was the result of widespread fraud. Multiple state and federal reviews, as well as courts, have rejected those claims as unsupported.

Mr. Biden won the state-by-state Electoral College by 306-232 and carried the popular vote by more than seven million ballots.

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The only Democrat on Georgia’s election board, David Worley, asked Mr. Raffensperger in a letter on Sunday to investigate whether the President had violated state law that prohibits solicitation to commit election fraud.

Mr. Raffensperger said the district attorney in Fulton County, home to Atlanta, might be the appropriate authority to carry out such an investigation. The county’s district attorney, Fani Willis, did not return a request for comment.

In another blow to Mr. Trump, staunch conservative Senator Tom Cotton refused to sign on to a long-shot campaign by nearly a dozen other Republicans in the U.S. Senate this week to challenge Mr. Biden’s victory, warning it was outside of Congress’ power and would “establish unwise precedents.”

In a statement on Sunday, Mr. Cotton said he would not join his colleagues Ted Cruz, Josh Hawley and others in defying Republican Party leaders by objecting on Jan. 6 when lawmakers meet to tally the votes in the Electoral College – a largely symbolic act of certification.

Mr. Cotton, Mr. Cruz and Mr. Hawley are among those considered possible 2024 presidential candidates. Mr. Trump, who has not conceded defeat, has also floated the idea of running again in 2024.

Thomas J. Donohue, chief executive of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, criticized the effort on Monday, saying it “undermines our democracy and the rule of law and will only result in further division across our nation.”

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Several moderate Republicans have also joined the criticism of Mr. Cruz, Mr. Hawley and others for undermining the of the voters and planning to object – a move they say will not succeed in installing Mr. Trump but will erode confidence in U.S. democracy.

It was not immediately clear how the release of Mr. Trump’s call with Mr. Raffensperger could affect the Republicans’ objection plan.

“This call was not a helpful call,” Republican U.S. Senator Marsha Blackburn, who is among those planning to object to the certification, told Fox News in an interview on Monday.

U.S. Representative Liz Cheney, the No. 3 House Republican, criticized the call as “deeply troubling” on Monday, according to a congressional pool report.

House of Representatives Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy defended Mr. Trump’s call in an interview with Fox News. “The President believes that there are things that happened in Georgia that he wants to see accountability for,” he said.

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell has publicly acknowledged Mr. Biden’s win. U.S. Vice-President Mike Pence, who will oversee the Jan. 6 proceedings, has said the Republicans have the right to object.

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