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U.S. President Donald Trump walks to the Oval Office while arriving back at the White House on Dec. 31, 2020 in Washington, DC.

Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

U.S. President Donald Trump badgered and pleaded with Georgia’s election chief to overturn Joe Biden’s win in the state, suggesting in a telephone call that the official “find” enough votes to hand Mr. Trump the victory.

The conversation Saturday was the latest step in an unprecedented effort by a sitting president to pressure a state official to reverse the outcome of a free and fair election that he lost. The renewed intervention and the persistent and unfounded claims of fraud by the first president to lose re-election in almost 30 years come nearly two weeks before Mr. Trump leaves office and two days before twin runoffs in Georgia that will determine control of the Senate.

Mr. Trump confirmed in a tweet Sunday that he had spoken with Georgia’s Secretary of State, Republican Brad Raffensperger, a day earlier.

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Audio snippets of the conversation were posted online by the Washington Post. A recording of the call was later obtained by the Associated Press from a person who was on the call.

U.S. President Donald Trump pressured Georgia’s top election official to 'find' enough votes to overturn his defeat in the southern state, according to a recording of the hour-long call first released by The Washington Post on Sunday. Reuters

The President, who has refused to accept his loss to the Democratic president-elect, is heard telling Mr. Raffensperger at one point: “All I want to do is this. I just want to find 11,780 votes, which is one more than we have. Because we won the state.”

Georgia’s certified election results show Mr. Biden won the state’s Nov. 3 election by 11,779 votes.

The White House referred questions to Mr. Trump’s re-election campaign, which did not respond Sunday to an e-mailed request for comment. Mr. Raffensperger’s office did not respond to a text message seeking comment.

Biden senior adviser Bob Bauer said the recording was “irrefutable proof” of Mr. Trump pressuring and threatening an official in his own party to “rescind a state’s lawful, certified vote count and fabricate another in its place.”

“It captures the whole, disgraceful story about Donald Trump’s assault on American democracy,” Mr. Bauer said.

At another point in the conversation, Mr. Trump appeared to threaten Mr. Raffensperger and Ryan Germany, the Secretary of State’s legal counsel, by suggesting both could be criminally liable if they failed to find that thousands of ballots in Fulton County had been illegally destroyed. There is no evidence to support Mr. Trump’s claim.

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“That’s a criminal offence,” Mr. Trump says. “And you can’t let that happen.”

Mr. Trump has repeatedly attacked how Mr. Raffensperger ran Georgia’s elections, claiming without evidence that the state’s 16 electoral votes were wrongly given to Mr. Biden.

“He has no clue!” Mr. Trump tweeted of Mr. Raffensperger, saying the state official “was unwilling, or unable” to answer questions about a series of claims about ballot handling and voters that have been debunked or shot down by judges and election authorities.

Mr. Raffensperger’s Twitter response: “Respectfully, President Trump: What you’re saying is not true. The truth will come out.”

There was no widespread fraud in the election, which a range of election officials across the country, as well as Mr. Trump’s former attorney-general, William Barr, have confirmed. Republican governors in Arizona and Georgia, key battleground states crucial to Mr. Biden’s victory, have also vouched for the integrity of the elections in their states. Nearly all the legal challenges from Mr. Trump and his allies have been dismissed by judges, including two tossed by the Supreme Court, which includes three Trump-nominated justices.

The Senate runoffs pit Senator Kelly Loeffler against Democrat Raphael Warnock and Senator David Perdue against Democrat Jon Ossoff. With the Senate up for grabs, the candidates and outside groups supporting them have spent hundreds of millions of dollars in the contests, deluging Georgia with television ads, mail, phone calls and door-knocking efforts.

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Ms. Loeffler said she had not decided whether to join Republican colleagues in challenging the legitimacy of Mr. Biden’s victory over Mr. Trump. The Democratic candidates whose wins Tuesday would help clear roadblocks for the new administration’s agenda awaited a campaign visit from vice-president-elect Kamala Harris.

Mr. Trump has persisted in attacking top Georgia Republicans over his election loss in the state, raising fears that his words could cause some Republicans to stay away from the polls.

“I believe that we [Democrats] will win on Tuesday because of the grassroots momentum, the unprecedented movement energy in Georgia right now,” Mr. Ossoff told CNN’s State of the Union. “It feels in Georgia like we are on the cusp of a historic victory.”

Ms. Loeffler, when asked about siding with the growing group of Senate Republicans seeking to contest the Electoral College count, said she was “looking very closely at it, and I’ve been one of the first to say, everything’s on the table.” She told Fox News Sunday that “I’m fighting for this President because he’s fought for us. He’s our President and we’re going to keep making sure that this is a fair election.”

Mr. Warnock, the senior pastor at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta who has continued to preach as he campaigns for office, seemed to allude to the runoff in a message delivered Sunday. He told viewers watching remotely due to the pandemic that they are “on the verge of victory” in their lives if they accept that God has already equipped them with the ability to overcome their adversaries.

“When God is with you, you can defeat giants,” said Mr. Warnock, who ended the early morning service by encouraging Georgians to vote on Tuesday. “It’s so very important that your voice be heard in this defining moment in our country,” he said. “I would not be so presumptuous as to tell you who to vote for.”

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Ms. Loeffler was appointed to fill a vacancy when Republican Johnny Isakson resigned his seat, and she will be in the Senate, win or lose this coming week, until the election is certified. Mr. Perdue’s seat will temporarily be vacant after his term expires Sunday at the end of six years.

Ms. Harris was scheduled to be in Savannah on Sunday afternoon. Mr. Trump and Mr. Biden plan last-minute, in-person efforts Monday to mobilize voters after more than three million people cast ballots early.

The President continues to create turbulence for Ms. Loeffler and Mr. Perdue by questioning Mr. Biden’s narrow victory in Georgia and the reliability of the state’s election systems.

Mr. Trump also tweeted that Georgia Governor Brian Kemp and Lieutenant-Governor Geoff Duncan, also Republicans, “have done less than nothing. They are a disgrace to the great people of Georgia!”

The President last week called on Mr. Kemp to resign; the Governor dismissed it as a “distraction.”

Despite the attacks, Ms. Loeffler said she believed voters would heed Mr. Trump’s expected plea during his upcoming visit that they should turn out.

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“He’s going to tell voters the same thing: You have to get out and vote Georgia, because this is too important,” Ms. Loeffler said.

Mr. Perdue, who is in quarantine after being exposed to a staff member with the coronavirus and won’t appear with Mr. Trump at Monday’s rally, said he would have joined the electoral challenge in the Senate if he had been in Washington. “I’m encouraging my colleagues to object. This is something that the American people demand right now,” he told Fox News Channel’s Sunday Morning Futures.

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