Skip to main content

U.S. Politics U.S. attorney-general Barr to release redacted Mueller report on Thursday

A motorcade carrying Attorney General William Barr arrives at the Department of Justice, on April 15, 2019, in Washington.

Patrick Semansky/The Associated Press

U.S. Attorney-General William Barr plans on Thursday morning to release a redacted version of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report on Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. election and contacts between Moscow and President Donald Trump’s campaign, the Justice Department said on Monday.

Department spokeswoman Kerri Kupec did not provide a precise time, but said the report, which Mr. Barr has described as nearly 400 pages long, will be released both to U.S. Congress and the public.

Moments after the department announced its plans for releasing the report, the Republican President went to Twitter to make another attack on Mr. Mueller’s team and derided the “Russia Hoax.” The Mueller investigation has cast a cloud over the presidency of Mr. Trump, who has often called it a politically motivated “witch hunt.”

Story continues below advertisement

Mr. Mueller turned over a copy of his confidential report to Mr. Barr on March 22, ending his 22-month-long inquiry. Two days later, Mr. Barr released a four-page letter summarizing what he said were Mr. Mueller’s primary conclusions. In that letter to Congress, Mr. Barr said Mr. Mueller’s investigation did not establish that members of Mr. Trump’s election campaign conspired with Russia.

Mr. Barr also wrote that Mr. Mueller presented evidence “on both sides” about whether Mr. Trump obstructed justice, but he did not draw a conclusion one way or the other. Mr. Barr said that he reviewed Mr. Mueller’s evidence and made his own determination that Mr. Trump did not commit the crime of obstruction of justice.

Mr. Barr has been under pressure from Democrats to release the full report without redactions. Mr. Barr, a Trump appointee, has pledged to be as transparent as possible, but he has said he will redact some sensitive information, including grand jury information and information about U.S. intelligence-gathering.

After Mr. Barr released his four-page letter, Mr. Trump claimed “complete and total exoneration,” condemned “an illegal takedown that failed” and accused unnamed political enemies of treasonous acts.

The redactions in the report will be colour-coded by category, according to Mr. Barr, explaining the reasons that parts are blacked out.

Since Mr. Barr released his letter, Mr. Trump has set his sights on the FBI, and accused the Justice Department of improperly targeting his campaign. Last week, Mr. Barr told a U.S. Senate panel he believed that “spying” did occur on Mr. Trump’s campaign, and he plans to investigate whether it was properly authorized.

“I think spying did occur,” Mr. Barr told the lawmakers. “But the question is whether it was adequately predicated.”

Story continues below advertisement

Mr. Barr’s comments were criticized by Democrats, who are already skeptical of how the Attorney-General has handled the report’s release.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter