Skip to main content

U.S. Politics U.S. Democrats divided on how to use Mueller report details on Trump’s attempts to thwart investigation

U.S. President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump walk on the South Lawn while departing the White House for a weekend trip to Mar-A-Lago, on April 18, 2019, in Washington.

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report into Russia’s role in the 2016 U.S. election provided extensive details on President Donald Trump’s efforts to thwart a federal investigation, giving Democrats plenty of political ammunition against the Republican but no consensus on how to use it.

The 448-page report painted a clear picture of how Trump had tried to hinder Mueller’s probe but stopped short of concluding the Republican president had committed the crime of obstruction of justice, although it did not exonerate him.

Mueller noted Congress has the power to address whether Trump violated the law, and Democrats quickly vowed to steam ahead with congressional investigations of the president.

Story continues below advertisement

But party leaders played down talk of impeachment just 18 months before the 2020 presidential election, even as some prominent members of the party’s progressive wing, most notably U.S. Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, promised to push the idea.

“Many know I take no pleasure in discussions of impeachment. I didn’t campaign on it, & rarely discuss it unprompted,” she said on Twitter. “But the report squarely puts this on our doorstep.”

Representative Doug Collins, the top Republican on the House Judiciary Committee, said Democrats had misconstrued a section of the report about obstruction of justice to suit their anti-Trump agenda.

“There seems to be some confusion … This isn’t a matter of legal interpretation; it’s reading comprehension,” Collins wrote on Twitter.

“The report doesn’t say Congress should investigate obstruction now. It says Congress can make laws about obstruction under Article I powers,” Collins said.

One paragraph in the report is at the heart of whether Mueller intended Congress to pursue further action against Trump, who could not be charged by the special counsel under a long-standing Justice Department policy not to indict a sitting president.

“The conclusion that Congress may apply the obstruction laws to the President’s corrupt exercise of the powers of office accords with our constitutional system of checks and balances and the principle that no person is above the law,” Mueller said in his report.

Story continues below advertisement

REPORT FINDINGS

Many of the report’s findings are certain to be repeated on the campaign trail as Democrats make their case against Trump’s re-election, although Democratic presidential candidates were cautious in responding on Thursday.

Mueller’s report noted “numerous links” between the Russian government and Trump’s campaign and said the president’s team “expected it would benefit electorally from information stolen and released through Russian efforts,” referring to hacked Democratic emails.

But Mueller, a former FBI director, concluded there was not enough evidence to establish that Trump’s campaign engaged in a criminal conspiracy with Moscow.

After the report’s release, Trump appeared to be in a celebratory mood. Trump, having long described Mueller’s investigation as a “witch hunt,” on Thursday night told a crowd of well wishers in Florida where he will spend the weekend: “Game over folks, now it’s back to work.”

The report, with some portions blacked out to protect sensitive information, revealed details of how Trump tried to force Mueller’s ouster, directed members of his administration to publicly vouch for his innocence and dangled a pardon to a former aide to try to prevent him from co-operating with the special counsel.

“The President’s efforts to influence the investigation were mostly unsuccessful, but that is largely because the persons who surrounded the President declined to carry out orders or accede to his requests,” the report stated.

Story continues below advertisement

The report said that when former Attorney General Jeff Sessions told Trump in May 2017 that the Justice Department was appointing a special counsel to look into allegations that his campaign colluded with Russia, Trump slumped back in his chair and said, “Oh my God. This is terrible. This is the end of my presidency. I’m fucked."

Attorney General William Barr told a news conference Mueller had detailed “10 episodes involving the president and discusses potential legal theories for connecting these actions to elements of an obstruction offence.” Barr concluded last month after receiving a confidential copy of Mueller’s report that Trump had not actually committed a crime.

IMPEACHMENT UNLIKELY

Any impeachment effort would start in the Democratic-led House, but Trump’s removal would require the support of the Republican-led Senate – an unlikely outcome.

The Democratic chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, Jerrold Nadler, said he would issue subpoenas to obtain the unredacted Mueller report and asked Mueller to testify before the panel by May 23.

The subpoena is likely to be issued on Friday, a source familiar with the matter said.

Nadler told reporters that Mueller probably wrote the report with the intent of providing Congress a road map for future action, but the congressman said it was too early to talk about impeachment.

Story continues below advertisement

House Democratic leader Steny Hoyer advised against trying to impeach Trump at the moment.

“Based on what we have seen to date, going forward on impeachment is not worthwhile at this point. Very frankly, there is an election in 18 months and the American people will make a judgment,” Hoyer told CNN.

The inquiry laid bare what the special counsel and U.S. intelligence agencies have described as a Russian campaign of hacking and propaganda to sow discord in the United States, denigrate 2016 Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton and boost Trump, the Kremlin’s preferred candidate. Russia has denied election interference.

In analyzing whether Trump obstructed justice, Mueller looked at a series of actions by Trump, including his attempts to remove Mueller and limit the scope of his probe and efforts to prevent the public from knowing about a June 2016 meeting at Trump Tower in New York between senior campaign officials and Russians.

In June 2017, Trump directed White House counsel Don McGahn to tell the Justice Department’s No. 2 official, Rod Rosenstein, that Mueller had conflicts of interest and must be removed, the report said. McGahn did not carry out the order. McGahn was home on a Saturday that month when Trump called him at least twice.

“You gotta do this. You gotta call Rod,” McGahn recalled the president as saying, according to the report.

Story continues below advertisement

House Judiciary Democrat Jamie Raskin pointed to Trump’s effort to get McGahn to fire Mueller and then lie about being told to do so as an area of interest for lawmakers, and said McGahn and Sessions could be valuable witnesses as the committee moves forward.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter