Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Support Quality Journalism.
The Globe and Mail
First Access to Latest
Investment News
Collection of curated
e-books and guides
Inform your decisions via
Globe Investor Tools
Just$1.99
per week
for first 24 weeks

Enjoy unlimited digital access
Enjoy Unlimited Digital Access
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){window.requestAnimationFrame(function() {var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))});}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1); // via darwin-bg var slideIndex = 0; carousel(); function carousel() { var i; var x = document.getElementsByClassName("subs_valueprop"); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } slideIndex++; if (slideIndex> x.length) { slideIndex = 1; } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; setTimeout(carousel, 2500); } //

Mr. McKinley was expected to tell investigators that some career diplomats had their careers derailed for political reasons while he served as adviser to Mr. Pompeo from May, 2018, until last Friday, according to the Washington Post.

Susan Walsh/The Associated Press

A former adviser to U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo who abruptly resigned last week spoke on Wednesday to an impeachment inquiry into allegations President Donald Trump pursued political interests in his dealings with Ukraine.

Former Pompeo adviser Michael McKinley, the latest senior administration official to give closed-door testimony to the Democratic-led inquiry, sat for five hours of questions from investigators as congressional Republicans stepped up attacks on a process that could end in Mr. Trump’s impeachment by the House of Representatives before the end of the year.

Lawmakers are examining whether Mr. Trump improperly pressured Ukraine to launch an investigation of former vice-president Joe Biden, a top political rival and leading candidate for the Democratic 2020 presidential nomination.

Story continues below advertisement

A veteran diplomat who had served as ambassador to Brazil and Afghanistan, Mr. McKinley was expected to tell investigators that some career diplomats had their careers derailed for political reasons while he served as adviser to Mr. Pompeo from May, 2018, until last Friday, according to the Washington Post.

The newspaper said he resigned over State Department leadership’s unwillingness to defend former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch against an effort to intervene in the country for Trump’s political benefit. Ms. Yovanovitch, who was withdrawn earlier this year, told investigators last week that the President ousted her on “unfounded and false claims.”

Previous witnesses have described how policy staff were sidelined on Ukraine by Mr. Trump’s personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, and others. Investigators expect to hear next week from acting U.S. ambassador to Ukraine William Taylor, who raised concerns that security aid was being withheld to pressure Ukraine, according to sources familiar with the matter.

“We’ve uncovered significant evidence of Trump’s abuse of power. And we’ll continue to expose the truth,” House intelligence committee chairman Adam Schiff, who is leading the impeachment inquiry, said on Twitter on Wednesday.

Mr. Trump denounced the inquiry as a “witch hunt” on Twitter early on Wednesday and later told reporters that Democrats were being disrespectful. He accused House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of handing out subpoenas “like cookies.”

In related news, the Federal Bureau of Investigation on Wednesday arrested David Correia, one of four people charged last week in an alleged scheme to funnel US$1-million in donations to politicians and political candidates to benefit a planned marijuana business funded by an unnamed Russian businessman.

RAMPING UP ATTACKS

Ramping up attacks on Democrats, House Republicans complained of being denied access to witness transcripts and said they would introduce a censure resolution against Mr. Schiff.

Story continues below advertisement

A House vote to impeach Mr. Trump would lead to a trial in the Republican-controlled Senate that could result in his ouster. But so far, few Senate Republicans have criticized the President.

The House probe is focused on a July 25 phone call in which Mr. Trump pressed Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate unsubstantiated allegations against Biden and his son, Hunter Biden, who was on the board of a Ukrainian gas company.

Democrats accuse Trump of pressuring Ukraine to dig up dirt on a domestic rival after withholding $391 million in U.S. security aid to help combat Russian-backed separatists. Zelenskiy agreed to investigate. Trump eventually allowed the aid.

Trump has denied wrongdoing and defended his request to Zelenskiy. Biden and his son also deny wrongdoing.

Gordon Sondland, a Trump political donor and a key actor in the unfolding political drama as U.S. ambassador to the European Union, is expected to appear on Thursday in response to a subpoena after he initially declined to testify.

Our Morning Update and Evening Update newsletters are written by Globe editors, giving you a concise summary of the day’s most important headlines. Sign up today.

Story continues below advertisement

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies