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Where The Globe discusses community, journalism and how Canadians shape our stories

Entry archive:

Do you have the most connected home in Canada?

Do you start your dishwasher, control the temperature of your fridge and turn on your front hall light by tapping an app on your phone? Get an email when your surveillance system detects motion? Stream music through your showerhead? We're looking for Canada's highly connected homes to feature in an upcoming video project. If you think yours is a good candidate (and you'd like to show it off) fill out the form below.

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Public editor: When a critic is accused of having an agenda

Sylvia Stead

Some journalists are expected to have a point of view. Political columnists comment on public policies, and critics are, well, critical when evaluating a performance. In both cases, the writers have opinions and should feel free to express them.

There is also a tradition of provocative thinking in columns and critical writing that is important to free speech. The views expressed often spark a wider debate on the letters page and social media as well as around the dinner table.

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Slash debt, save more: Money tips from Carrick's financial boot camp

Rob Carrick

 

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Public editor: Stories on vaccination aren’t propaganda

Sylvia Stead

I received an e-mail from a reader who said he always believed The Globe and Mail has professional standards and is very objective in its news coverage.

“I have to admit though, as a person with no academic or professional background associated with vaccination, I am surprised at the one-dimensional reporting on this topic. It feels like the paper is engaged in an act of public duty propaganda-style. I find it difficult to believe that the individuals belonging to the ‘anti-vaxxer’ community have no credible person(s) who could intelligently and responsibly relate the complex rationale that is the basis for their position on this issue,” he wrote.

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Your wonderful images of backyard ice rinks

 

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Earlier: Q&A with sports columnist Cathal Kelly

Sports columnist Cathal Kelly hosted a Facebook Q&A on Feb. 13 from 12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m. ET. Questions ranged from a rebuild of the Toronto Maple Leafs to the future of the TFC. Click here to read a recap of the chat.

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Public editor: It’s not a poll; it’s just reader feedback

Sylvia Stead

I’ve had a few complaints about a recent survey of Globe and Mail readers’ views on federal politics asking if they believed Stephen Harper’s Canada is better, worse or unchanged.

So what’s good and what’s bad about this particular survey?

It’s good that readers are being engaged on what will be the political story of the year. The survey attracted 138,000 votes, so it’s obviously a topic of great interest.

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Ask political writer John Ibbitson anything on Reddit

After nine years as prime minister, Stephen Harper has made Canada a more conservative place. That's the argument John Ibbitson, The Globe's writer-at-large, made in a feature published this weekend (subscribers only).

Mr. Ibbitson will take questions on that piece and anything else about Mr. Harper's tenure in Ottawa on Reddit from 3 to 4:30 p.m. ET.

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Public editor: If The Globe was perfect, we’d never beg the question

Sylvia Stead

The headline above was on my column on grammatical mistakes that appeared in Saturday’s Focus section.

It was penned by a very clever editor, Victor Dwyer: a wordsmith, writer and, if I may say, grammar nerd with a great sense of humour.

Not surprisingly, many Globe readers were in on the joke.

One reader from Winnipeg wrote: “If the Globe WERE Perfect ...?” Then, just four minutes later, “Duh! Got it ... now.”

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Survey results: Stephen Harper's Canada: Better, worse or unchanged?

Feb. 6 marks nine years since Stephen Harper was sworn in as Prime Minister, so we asked readers to rate how Canada has fared under his watch in areas such as the economy, environment and reputation in the world. Our survey attracted more than 138,000 responses. Here are the (unscientific) results:

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Public editor: Egregious grammatical errors caught by Globe readers

Sylvia Stead

Globe and Mail readers are very well-read and, rightly so, are sticklers for good grammar. Not a week goes by without a few notes. This month, one reader asked writers to “please stop the redundancy” by adding “why” after “the reasons.”

One man despaired over the mixing up of flout and flaunt. “If we mix up the two words, soon the distinction will be lost and neither word will mean anything.”

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Public editor: Why coverage of polls will be important in election year

Sylvia Stead

Writing about opinion polls is kind of like sports coverage. You need to get the score right and you need to understand if a team is on the rise or stuck in a rut, but, whether that day or the next, a writer needs to explain what it really means.

This year, with a federal election looming, the coverage of opinion polls will be important.

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Do you believe in monogamy? Take our love and sex poll

 

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Stephen Harper's Canada: Better, worse or unchanged? Take our poll

Feb. 6 marks nine years since Stephen Harper was sworn in as Prime Minister. We'll be taking a look at his record and how Canada has changed, but first we wanted to know what you think. This poll is now closed; you can view the (unscientific) results here.

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Public editor: Seven reasons why coverage of Rob Ford will continue

Sylvia Stead

Rob Ford.

So, readers, you thought that you wouldn’t read any more stories about the former mayor of Toronto. In fact, some of you have taken to Twitter or commented online, rather vehemently, to protest against this latest story (about Mr. Ford’s criticism of Mayor John Tory after his first month on the job) and to beg the editors to stop, just stop.

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Public editor: Why The Globe didn’t publish the Charlie Hebdo cartoons

Sylvia Stead

There is a debate going on about whether newspapers should have published some of the Charlie Hebdo cartoons showing the Prophet Mohammed.

On Thursday, contributor Timothy Garton Ash says European media should publish: “I would suggest that the publication or broadcast over this week should include not only a few of the Charlie Hebdo cartoons relating to Mohammed, but also one or two devoted to other subjects, so everyone can see that this was a satirical magazine, offensive to many different kinds of people. That’s what satire does.”

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Public editor: Suspect or accused, or just killer?

Sylvia Stead

A journalist’s instinct in dealing with crime is to be careful, and rightly so. Suspicions aren’t always right, police charges don’t always stick in court. So when charges are laid for serious crimes, the media correctly describe someone as being a suspect or accused of a crime. The final ruling on innocence or guilt is up to the courts.

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Public editor: Readers have no trouble spotting the error of our ways

Sylvia Stead

Last Saturday, my year-end column on errors was a quiz that included 15 notable mistakes – what The Globe and Mail got wrong and what the article should have said. The headline “Can you spot the errors of our ways” was a great invitation to readers to keep noticing the mistakes and keep helping The Globe correct its errors.

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Acts of kindness that prove 'even Torontonians can be friendly and helpful'

We asked readers to share any acts of kindness they witnessed throughout the year. Someone or something that inspired them and left an impression. Here are some of their responses - we hope they help spread some joy this holiday season: 

Now that’s teamwork

I was in a Toronto café, eating a quick lunch on a cold day in November. A streetcar pulled up and a woman took out her wallet to get her monthly TTC pass, worth about $134. It somehow slipped out of her hand and sailed right into a construction crew’s trench that was a few inches deep and filled with mucky water.

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Share photos of your backyard ice rinks

What's more Canadian than playing shinny in winter? Playing shinny on a rink you made yourself.

Making a backyard ice rink isn't easy - so why not show it off? Please fill out the form below and click Next to upload a photo of your rink and tell us a bit about it.

All photos should be taken this year. If selected, your photo may be published in an upcoming feature. By submitting, you are confirming that you are the copyright holder and that we have your consent to publish it. Your photo must be no larger than 60 MB, or else it will not upload.

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