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Where The Globe discusses community, journalism and how Canadians shape our stories

Entry archive:

Get election updates sent right to you with The Globe and WhatsApp

Melissa Whetstone

This federal election campaign, we have a new way to help you stay informed. Using the messenging app WhatsApp, we’ll send the stories, photos and videos you need to make an informed vote on Oct. 19.  These messages may include the top news story of the day, notes from our reporters on the campaign trail, the latest poll numbers or links to interviews with the party candidates. We will not send more than one message a day throughout the campaign, with the potential for a few more the week of the election.

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Q&A with Stephanie Nolen, Latin America Bureau Chief

Stephanie Nolen

This Reddit Ask Me Anything has ended. See what you missed here.

I cover Latin America for The Globe, from a base in Rio de Janeiro, a city that's all the things you've read about (or seen in the cartoon.) It's not all cocktails and bikinis - I write about Brazil's challenges with social inequality and violence. I spent much of the past year working on a project on race and identity in Brazil.

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Public editor: Who complains about campaign coverage – and why

Sylvia Stead

If my inbox is any measure, Canadians are certainly feeling passionate about the federal election. Some say they believe The Globe and Mail’s coverage has been slanted.

Here are two examples:

Why, they ask, was The Globe focusing on the trial of Senator Mike Duffy during the campaign, and giving the opposition leaders so much space to attack Conservative Leader Stephen Harper, when the case itself is not an election issue.

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Globe and Mail app updated to improve navigation and load times

Matt Frehner

Today’s update to The Globe and Mail’s app for iPad and iPhone includes some major improvements based on feedback from readers over the last few months.

You can download the update now.

Our focus for this update has been on performance and navigation — two key themes that emerged from your comments, e-mails and reviews.

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You learn something every day dealing with Globe readers

Sylvia Stead

It was a small slip in an interesting story about North Korea’s plan to introduce a new time zone and blot out reminders of Japanese rule.

The article confused latitude and longitude (one of those things I can never get straight without looking it up). Degrees of latitude are horizontal lines that go north and south from the equator. Degrees of longitude are the vertical lines that affect time zones.

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Public editor: Which image best captures the subject?

Sylvia Stead

Above is a photo that ran in The Globe and Mail on Saturday with an article noting the death of a most remarkable woman. Frances Kelsey, born in Canada, worked in the United States as a medical examiner. Imagine the drive and intelligence that it took in those days for a young woman from Vancouver Island to become the first candidate to obtain a PhD in pharmacology from the University of Chicago.

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What's your biggest worry about Canada's economy and why?

The Globe and Mail is hosting a federal election debate on Sept. 17 in Calgary and we want to include your voices. What concerns do you have about Canada's economy? Tell us what message you want to send to the party leaders, and it may be included during the debate.

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Public Editor: Meet a tireless reader who keeps The Globe on its toes

Sylvia Stead

I hear from my share (okay, maybe more than my share) of critical readers, but I also have the distinct pleasure of hearing from some very smart Canadians who love good journalism and expect perfection from The Globe and Mail.

One regular correspondent is Alain Gingras, a recently retired diplomat who worked in Malaysia, Syria, Sri Lanka, the Philippines and a dozen other places. In total, he says, he has visited more than 50 countries and gone around the world several times. He would be a great partner in a trivia contest (in fact, I have asked him for a little fact-checking help on place names in Southeast Asia).

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'This is ridiculous': Canadian expats sound off on losing voting rights

 

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Public Editor: Readers want more, positive Pan Am Games coverage

Sylvia Stead

More Pan Am games coverage and better play in the paper is what a few readers have asked for over the weekend.

“Why was it back alongside the weather?” asked one.

A reader from Oakville said: “Here is an opportunity to have some pride in our country, to celebrate our ability to host such an event in a safe, welcoming, multicultural environment, and to engage young people. I attended the rehearsal of the opening ceremony and it was full of many young, enthusiastic volunteers. Yes, it is well known that final cost will be higher than projected, and commuters will have to add on more time to their commute during these two weeks but that is not what the games are now about. This is a time to be proud to be a fortunate Canadian, to enjoy the venues, to cheer on the athletes and to stop dissing the inconveniences that generosity requires.

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Here's what's new in the latest Globe app update

Matt Frehner

Since the release of our new iPhone and iPad app about a month ago, we’ve received a lot of valuable feedback from readers about issues they’re having, or features they’d like to see improved or tweaked.

I’m pleased to say that we’ve just released our first major update to the app, which includes more than 300 changes — from small bug fixes to major improvements to content and navigation.

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What's new in The Globe's iOS app

Matt Frehner

Last night we made a few key changes to our new app for iPhone and iPad, based on feedback we’ve received from readers since the app launched. The changes bring you more stories and more scannable ways to find the top news from the sections you care about. Here’s what you’ll see in the app today:

  • We’ve introduced new, separate sections for Sports and Life & Arts to make it easier to find the latest news, columns and game reports from all the major sports, as well as create a dedicated space for our coverage of arts, culture, food, wine, fashion, travel, health and cars.
  • Our Top Headlines section, now available on both iPad and iPhone, gives you an easily scannable view of the most recent key stories, organized according to familiar Globe sections, including: business, investing, national news, politics, world, sports, automotive and more.
  • Finally, we’ve updated the home screen view on the iPhone. The new home screen leads with an overview of the most important stories that the Globe is currently following. Scroll down and you’ll find an easily scannable list of the top headlines of the moment from all of The Globe's main sections. Watch for further improvements to this home screen view in future updates.

We are also planning a series of regular App Store updates over the next several months. The next one, coming in July, will have a lot of improvements to app navigation, speed and overall functionality.

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Public Editor: Why using anonymous sources is sometimes necessary

SYLVIA STEAD

Last week, a reader in Toronto raised an important point about the use of anonymous sources in an article on what he called “allegations of improper influence of Chinese officials over Ontario Minister Michael Chan.”

In fact, many of you may see the phrase “sources say” in stories from time to time, and wonder what it actually means. Who are these sources and how do we know they are telling the truth?

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Recap: Online Q&A with Globe reporters on financial literacy

On Monday June 22, 2015, Report on Business reporter Jacqueline Nelson and personal finance columnist Rob Carrick were on Facebook for a live online discussion on the topic of financial literacy. Teachers, parents and all financially curious Canadians, had a chance to ask them anything - about money.

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Public editor: Inclusivity important when writing about indigenous issues

Sylvia Stead

A constant challenge for all journalists is to be as knowledgeable as you can possibly be on whatever subject you are covering. The more you know, the better the question you can ask, and the more intelligent the work on any subject will be.

One very complex subject is understanding indigenous issues in Canada including the murdered and missing women, residential schools and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which reported earlier this month.

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Why is there an old gun in our office? Join our artifact tour on Periscope

In preparation for The Globe and Mail's move to its new building in Toronto, we've been going through our archives and uncovering some interesting pieces. From an old gun to an unopened time capsule to the first-ever printed Globe and Mail and much more, join us for a tour on live-streaming app Periscope, Tuesday, June 22 at 3 p.m. ET. Watch our Twitter feed: @globeandmail for the link. It is best viewed on a mobile device. 

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Dear Toronto: Get over yourselves. Love, Edmonton and Sarnia

SYLVIA STEAD

In the past few days, a couple of Globe writers became unpopular in two Canadian cities. The one you may know about was sports columnist Cathal Kelly for his opinion that the opening game of the FIFA Women’s World Cup should have been in Toronto, not Edmonton.

Hundreds of complaints, calls and tweets disagreed in the most vehement way.

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Editor’s letter: The logic behind The Globe’s new iOS app

DAVID WALMSLEY

I want to address a couple of questions readers have about the new Globe and Mail app: is there less content and why are we curating your news?

In today’s rapid, complex, interconnected, information saturated world, The Globe is committed to producing and presenting high-value journalism on multiple platforms. We redesigned the newspaper section, Report on Business, in early May, adding more reporters to that section, more commentary and analysis and a greater focus on Canada’s economic pillars. And now we have launched our new iOS app.

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