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Mercedes Formula One driver Nico Rosberg of Germany (R) stands next to teammate Mercedes Formula One driver Lewis Hamilton of Britain after Rosberg took pole position in the qualifying session of the Monaco F1 Grand Prix in Monaco May 24, 2014. (MAX ROSSI/REUTERS)
Mercedes Formula One driver Nico Rosberg of Germany (R) stands next to teammate Mercedes Formula One driver Lewis Hamilton of Britain after Rosberg took pole position in the qualifying session of the Monaco F1 Grand Prix in Monaco May 24, 2014. (MAX ROSSI/REUTERS)

Formula One

Will Hamilton and Rosberg bring their rivalry to Montreal this weekend? Add to ...

On tap this week:

• Tension grows between Hamilton, Rosberg

• Schumacher is king of Canada

• Montreal breaks brakes

• Indy 500 lessons for F1 drivers

• Quote of the Week: Ganassi motivates

• Hinchcliffe shakes bad luck

Like the Friends theme song says: No one told them life as teammates was gonna be this way.

More Related to this Story

Lewis Hamilton says he and Mercedes teammate Nico Rosberg are still friends.

But Rosberg doesn't think his teammate will be coming over to raid the fridge in his Monaco flat any time soon – something the German said happened many times previously when Hamilton ran out of food.

Meanwhile, Mercedes team boss Toto Wolff insists that the comparing his drivers to the acrid rivalry between Ayrton Senna and Alain Prost at McLaren 25 years ago scenario is off-base.

Anyone who noticed that Hamilton barely acknowledged victor Rosberg on the podium in Monaco a week ago, and then walked away before the champagne was sprayed, knows that all is not well inside the Mercedes camp.

That podium snub didn't sit well with two-time world champion Mika Häkkinen, who suggested that Hamilton needs to learn how to lose.

How the team handles the increasingly tense situation inside the Mercedes cockpits will be on full display in Montreal, where the Formula One circus arrives this week for Sunday's race.

Getting the two drivers back on speaking terms falls to team chairman and three-time world champion Niki Lauda, who admitted after Monaco that things were getting out of hand.

Lauda, who insisted that all would be back to normal – whatever that is – by Montreal, may be the perfect man for the job. He understands not having a good relationship with a teammate after spending two seasons in the mid-1980s racing alongside Prost, who he admits he hated and with whom he refused to share any information.

Mechanical issues notwithstanding, the two Mercedes drivers will likely continue their dominance of the 2014 season at the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve. And that might heat up the rivalry even further.

The two evenly matched drivers in identical cars have swept all six races so far this year and finished 1-2 in every race that both have seen the chequered flag. Apart from the Monaco Grand Prix last week, no other team has even been close to challenging the Mercedes pairing.

While it's a good bet one of the Mercedes drivers will win Sunday's the Canadian Grand Prix, the race may also determine whether they leave with their relationship stuck in second gear.

By the Numbers: When it comes to wins, Michael Schumacher stood on the top step of the podium at the Canadian Grand Prix seven times, with his first triumph coming in 1994. His six poles in Canada is also record. In addition, the seven-time world champion set the mark for most consecutive wins in Montreal after taking three in a row beginning in 2002. Three-time world champion Jackie Steward (1971-1972) and 1980 titlist Alan Jones (1979-1980) are the only other drivers to take back-to-back wins in Canada.

The active driver with the most wins in Montreal is 2008 world champion Lewis Hamilton with three. He is tied in second with three times world champion Nelson Piquet.

Hamilton also scored his maiden win in the 2007 race, becoming the fifth driver to take his first grand prix win in Canada. The others are: Jean Alesi (1995), Thierry Boutsen (1989), Robert Kubica (2008), and Gilles Villeneuve (1978), who is also the only Canadian to win his home grand prix.

Five drivers in the field for Sunday's race are previous winners in Montreal: Kimi Räikkönen (2005), Fernando Alonso (2006), Lewis Hamilton (2007, 2010, and 2012), Jenson Button (2011) and Sebastian Vettel (2013).

Since the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve was reconfigured in 2002, Rubens Barrichello's 2004 lap of 1 minute 13.622 seconds (213.246 km/h) is the quickest around the 14-turn, 4.361 kilometre layout used for Sunday's race.

Technically Speaking: The Circuit Gilles Villeneuve is known as a "stop and go" track: Basically, it's a bunch of corners slapped between a series of straights. Not only does this mean the drivers are in the brakes for a relatively high 13 per cent of the lap, but it also does not allow the brake pads and discs to cool sufficiently, which leads to heavy wear and possible failures.

According to brake component maker Brembo, Turn 13 at the end of the Casino Straight is the most demanding on the braking system at the track.

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