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Byron Sonne, 39, who's trial began Monday, leaves the courthouse in Toronto. Police allege he assembled homemade explosives and incited others to tear down the G20 security fence and surveillance cameras through his Twitter and Flickr accounts. (Kevin Van Paassen/The Globe and Mail/Kevin Van Paassen/The Globe and Mail)
Byron Sonne, 39, who's trial began Monday, leaves the courthouse in Toronto. Police allege he assembled homemade explosives and incited others to tear down the G20 security fence and surveillance cameras through his Twitter and Flickr accounts. (Kevin Van Paassen/The Globe and Mail/Kevin Van Paassen/The Globe and Mail)

Byron Sonne wanted to 'stick it to the system,' G20 trial hears Add to ...

Closing arguments are underway in the trial of a man police once suspected of plotting to bomb Toronto's riot-plagued G20 summit.

Byron Sonne is accused of possessing explosive materials, along with the more obscure charge of counselling to commit an offence not committed.

The Crown is telling the court that it's not necessary that Mr. Sonne actually planned to build a bomb.

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But Liz Nadeau says it is clear the accused had chemicals at home that could have been used to make a bomb.

The Crown also maintains Mr. Sonne wanted to “stick it to the system” in the lead-up to the June 2010 summit.

Mr. Sonne, a self-described security geek and former Internet security expert, was arrested just days before the summit began.

Police allege he assembled homemade explosives and incited others to tear down the G20 security fence and surveillance cameras through his Twitter and Flickr accounts.

Mr. Sonne maintains he was merely trying to expose flaws in G20 security and the chemicals he possessed were all legal, and were used for making model rockets and crystals.

He spent 330 days in jail before being released from custody on bail last May.

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