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No chance of parole for 10 years for David Bagshaw, who can now be named for the murder of Toronto teen
No chance of parole for 10 years for David Bagshaw, who can now be named for the murder of Toronto teen

Rengel killer handed life sentence Add to ...

The young man who killed Stefanie Rengel and left her to die has received an adult sentence of life in prison with no parole for 10 years.

The ruling from ontario Superior Court Judge Ian Nordheimer means David Bagshaw, now 19, can be identified by name.

It is the maximum available sentence allowed for a teenager of 17, the age Mr. Bagshaw was when he lured Stefanie from her east-end Toronto home and plunged a knife six times into her body.

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Stefanie, just 14, was but steps from her house when she collapsed and died in the snow of a cold New Year's Day, 2008.

Outside court, Stefanie's 13-year-old brother Ian spoke for his shattered family, describing their relief at the sentence. But he noted that because Mr. Bagshaw killed Stefanie four days before he turned 18, and was thus still a young offender, 15 years of parole ineligibility was automatically knocked off the sentence.

"My sister didn't even get to be 15", he said.

Earlier this year, the young woman who was the driving force behind the crime, Mr. Bagshaw's girlfriend Melissa Todorovic, was convicted of first degree murder for her role in Stefanie's slaying.

She had badgered Mr. Bagshaw relentlessly to kill the girl she'd never even met, but obsessed about and saw as a rival.

She too received a so called adult sentence of life in prison with no parole for 10 years.

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