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A chain link fence inside the Eurotunnel site in Coquelles near Calais. Britain is building a wall in the northern French port to stop migrants jumping on trucks. The four-metre high, one-kilometre-long barrier is being built on a port approach road. (Philippe Huguen/AFP/Getty Images)
A chain link fence inside the Eurotunnel site in Coquelles near Calais. Britain is building a wall in the northern French port to stop migrants jumping on trucks. The four-metre high, one-kilometre-long barrier is being built on a port approach road. (Philippe Huguen/AFP/Getty Images)

WHAT READERS THINK

Sept. 10: Walled thought, walled shores. Plus other letters to the editor Add to ...

Letters to the Editor should be exclusive to The Globe and Mail. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. Try to keep letters to fewer than 150 words. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. To submit a letter by e-mail, click here: letters@globeandmail.com

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‘Such an ill-conceived project’

Re School Takes Role Playing Exercise To The Extreme (Sept. 9): What is being done at the Norma Rose Point School in Vancouver is not “role playing.” The Grade 7 children are not aware of what is happening, thus this is not a “role,” and they are not playing. If a researcher wanted to do this, she/he would have to gain the approval of a research ethics board, which probably wouldn’t have approved such an ill-conceived project. At the least, parental permission (“informed consent”) would be required.

This exercise has not been well thought out: The more I considered this, the more negative aspects I envisioned. What is being done at this school will be of little benefit to anyone, least of all the children.

Anne Barnfield, associate professor of psychology; School of Social and Behavioural Sciences, Brescia University College

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Walled thought, walled shores

Globalization seems so yesterday.

It wasn’t very long ago that politicians wouldn’t stop touting the wonders of globalization, telling us just how it would raise living standards for every citizen in the global village. But now, with the surprising voter reaction to Donald Trump’s anti-immigration proposals getting him the Republican Party’s presidential ticket, and the premature end to David Cameron’s political career from misreading Brexit, politicians around the world are worried about survival using their time-tested “open borders” mantra.

Some of our very own Canadian wannabe leaders are wasting no time jumping on the anti-immigration bandwagon, either. Never mind that the stance is so fundamentally at odds with our identity and reputation built from welcoming immigrants and refugees over the years. Some readers have also pointed out that if these proposals are ever implemented, they are bound to be ineffective and impractical. So what are Kellie Leitch and her ilk thinking? One can only conclude that this is nothing more than an opportunistic ride on the anti-immigration, anti-globalization bandwagon in order to grab as many votes as possible.

But are we seriously expecting any changes in Canadian policy or ideals? I would think not.

Amar Kumar, Burlington, Ont.

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How is it that building walls has become the new answer to the economic, political, social, and very personal problems of the world’s dispossessed? A wall to protect settlers in Israel’s occupied territories, Donald Trump’s wall to protect Americans from “rapists, murderers and drug dealers,” and now Britain’s wall in Calais to protect the U.K. from those displaced by Syria’s war and the chaos in North Africa (Why The Calais Wall Matters To Britain – Sept. 8).

Historically, Canada has been enriched by waves of immigration from such circumstances. The Scottish Highland Clearances of the 18th and 19th century forced many to look to North America for a new home. As a Canadian of Irish descent whose antecedents arrived here at the height of the Potato Famine, I am just glad that building a wall wasn’t an option then. Walls are the refuge of the weak.

Halton Doyle, Ajax, Ont.

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In 45 years, 11 hearings

Re Camp Sincerely Remorseful About Rape Remarks, Mentor Says (Sept. 8): The prospect of being let go from a prestigious position which pays more than $300,000 annually might inspire anyone to feel remorse over remarks which may result in a recommendation for dismissal. It might even inspire one to commit to doing better.

Leslie Lavers, Lethbridge, Alta.

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If Justice Robin Camp’s sensitivity and counselling sessions were truly successful, he would appreciate the abhorrence of his remarks, apologize and resign. Returning to the bench should not be an option.

Carol Faulkner, Wakefield, Que.

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I am surprised to learn that in the 45 years since the Canadian Judicial Council was formed in 1971, there have been just 11 hearings like the one into Justice Robin Camp’s conduct before this august body. That works out to fewer than one every four years, or less frequently than the summer Olympics.

I am physician and a member of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario. My college is charged with regulating my profession and maintaining the standards of care expected of all physicians and surgeons in Ontario. The Law Society of Upper Canada similarly regulates the lawyers of Ontario. Both the Law Society and the College of Physicians hold scores of meetings dealing with the conduct of lawyers and doctors every year, adding up to hundreds, if not thousands of hearings over a 45-year period.

The conduct of judges is in no way less deserving of scrutiny and supervision. Their decisions have important, sometimes grave consequences for the lives of the people on whom they sit in judgment. Even allowing for the fact there are far fewer judges than doctors and lawyers, doesn’t it seem strange that in 45 years there have been just 11 judicial hearings and only two recommendations for dismissal?

Ashok Sajnani, Toronto

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Let’s hope it spreads

Re Brampton Layoffs: An Approach Canadian Cities Should Emulate (Sept. 8): School boards are spending millions of dollars poaching students from nearby competing school divisions. This used to be a no-no, but now with declining enrolment anything goes. The City of Brampton on the other hand offloaded 25 surplus bureaucrats to give taxpayers a little much-needed relief. Let’s hope “Brampton Bravery” spreads throughout the nation as the taxpayer is pretty much worn out.

Peter Kaufmann, Winnipeg

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