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Arlene Dickinson (Ryan Emberley, Photographer: Rya)
Arlene Dickinson (Ryan Emberley, Photographer: Rya)

SMALL BUSINESS BRIEFING

'Dragon' Dickinson expands reach to entrepreneurs Add to ...

The latest news and information for entrepreneurs from across the web universe, brought to you by the Report on Small Business team. Follow us on Twitter @GlobeSmallBiz.

Arlene Dickinson launches new company to fund and support entrepreneurs

Busy, busy. Dragons' Den judge and Venture Communications CEO Arlene Dickinson is further expanding her reach to entrepreneurs by launching a new company aimed at investing in and supporting entrepreneurs, according to this announcement.

The new company, Arlene Dickinson Enterprises, has been created in partnership with Kirchner Private Capital Group and has signed a letter of intent to create a joint venture with Metroland Media Group Ltd.

It aims to promote the advancement of entrepreneurs through investments and developing multimedia properties, including a magazine, TV format, social networking and a website, under the YouInc.com banner, the release said.

“I’ve had a front row seat to the rise of the entrepreneurial movement in the world, which is why I created this online community for entrepreneurs to come together, collaborate, and embrace the entrepreneurial lifestyle,” writes Ms. Dickinson – who also stars in another TV show, The Big Decision with fellow Dragon Jim Treliving – in her welcome message on the site.

“You could be looking for backing for your next great idea. You could just want to connect with other people who see the world the way you do. Whatever your reason, this site is for you,” she says, noting it is targeted to serving both the work and home lives of entrepreneurs.

Even startups must prepare for unexpected

Startups have a lot on their plates to get going without thinking about how an unexpected major disaster could affect them.

 But, as this Wall Street Journal piece suggests, even one unforeseen calamity could create a big setback or even shutter a company just starting out. In fact, it reports, about a quarter of small businesses don’t reopen after a major disaster, citing the Institute for Business & Home Safety.

Even for cash-strapped startups, the piece advises setting aside some funds to help cover short-term expenses, such as payroll, payments to suppliers or uninsured expenses. It also suggests some advance planning, such as writing up how your company works, as well security passwords and contact information.

How to make the most of meetings

How can meetings become livelier and more effective? In this Washington Post blog, some young entrepreneurs offer up some answers.

EVENTS AND KEY DATES

Toronto’s Workforce Development Week

The city of Toronto today kicks off Workforce Development Week, running until Oct. 26 and aimed at helping to connect employers and those seeking jobs. Connected events range from Fashion Week to open house, information and networking events. For more details, click here.

Medical manufacturing innovation conference

Are you an innovator in the world of medical devices or interested in what’s new? The Medical Manufacturing Innovations, produced by the Society of Manufacturing Engineers, is is a two-day event bringing together suppliers and innovators in medical and dental device manufacturing. It takes place Oct. 24 and Oct. 25 in Toronto. For more information, click here.

Upcoming: Small Business Summit Toronto

Hot on the heels of our Vancouver event, The Globe and Mail’s Report on Small Business is readying for the next Small Business Summit, to take place in Toronto on Nov. 22. Register now at a discount. For more information on the day-long event to help entrepreneurs grow their businesses, click here.

EDITOR’S PICKS FROM REPORT ON SMALL BUSINESS

Is your private jet showing its age? Trick it out

Austerity can bite even the poshest of businesses and clients, including the private-jet trade. And so Kevin Hoffman is doing what any tenacious entrepreneur should do when the clients stop spending: He’s following the money and tailoring the service of his Aerospace Concepts to provide what jet owners can afford, writes Sean Silcoff in this piece

FROM THE ROSB ARCHIVES

Selling high: George Rependa circles the globe as plane salesman to the stars

It was a different time when Sean Silcoff wrote this piece, originally published in May, 2009, about Executive Aircraft Services Inc’s business of buying and selling private jets for ultra-rich clients.

Got a tip on news, events or other timely information related to the small-business community? E-mail us at smallbusiness@globeandmail.com. Join The Globe’s Small Business LinkedIn group to network with other entrepreneurs and to discuss topical issues: http://linkd.in/jWWdzT Our free weekly newsletter is now available. Every Friday a team of editors selects the top picks from our blog posts, features, multimedia and columnists, and delivers them to your inbox. If you have registered for The Globe’s website, you can sign up here. Click on the Small Business Briefing checkbox and hit ’save changes.’ If you need to register for the site, click here .

 

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