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A supporter holds a photo cutout of Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling while standing in line for the NBA Playoff game 5 between Golden State Warriors and Los Angeles Clippers at Staples Center in Los Angeles, California. (Mario Anzuoni/REUTERS)

A supporter holds a photo cutout of Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling while standing in line for the NBA Playoff game 5 between Golden State Warriors and Los Angeles Clippers at Staples Center in Los Angeles, California.

(Mario Anzuoni/REUTERS)

Donald’s ‘done’: Five U.S. media responses to Sterling’s defeat Add to ...

The NBA’s lifelong ban and $2.5-million fine on Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling for racist remarks has elicited strong reactions and soul-searching in U.S. mainstream media.

The NBA will try to force Sterling to sell his team after a recording showed him criticizing his mistress, V. Stiviano, for posting pictures of herself on social media with black people.

Here’s how some U.S. news organizations reacted to the decision.

Los Angeles Daily News, April 30 2014

SHORT BUT SWEET

Several U.S. papers went for punchy, single- or double-word headlines.

Robert Hanashiro/USA Today Sports

THE BIG GAME

Some reports tried to portray the Clippers’ 113-103 victory over the rival Golden State Warriors on Tuesday night as a happy ending to the Sterling saga. Others looked at the Warriors’ plan to boycott Game 5 if the NBA had not taken strong enough action against Sterling.

L.A. Times, April 30, 2014.

WHOSE BALL IS IN WHOSE COURT?

The phrase “the ball is in their court” came up more than once, with various explanations of whose court the figurative ball is now in.

Salon.com

THE ROOT PROBLEMS

The day came with several warnings that root causes of racism in sports haven’t been addressed.

CNN.com

WHAT NEXT?

Several observers zeroed in on how the Clippers could be sold, and who would profit from it. Some took issue with the NBA putting pressure on Sterling to sell the Clippers, arguing that his racist remarks weren’t actually illegal.

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