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How would you fix Sony? Add to ...

Executives and officials from the technology industry joined Reuters reporters at the Technology Summit in Paris and New York last week. They were asked how they would fix Sony. Here are some of their responses:

ROB GLASER, CHAIRMAN, REAL NETWORKS , and VENTURE PARTNER AT ACCEL PARTNERS

"Sony had a very siloed model of innovation. You had the Walkman team, you had the team doing PlayStation, you had the Trinitron TV group."

"In the modern era, being as siloed as they are creates a disadvantage in this connected world. Apple is the extreme other example. Jobs used the force of his personality to make people work together to make sure that when a new version of iOS comes out it works really well on iPhones and iPads."

"Apple's been able to forge this culture where all these pieces work together in harmony, and Sony's at the other end of the spectrum where they have this very siloed culture."

"Howard Stringer has talked openly about this. One of the things he's tried to do, coming in as a Westerner, is to change that culture, and it's super hard."

"You look at these huge company reinventions, and I would say the same would be true of Nokia, when the world changes and you have a set of assets that were incredibly valuable in the old world, but in the new world you have to completely reinvent what you are doing, massive scale becomes a disadvantage."

"At that scale, it's like introducing capitalism into a Soviet Bloc country after 50 years of communism."

JEN-HSUN HUANG, CEO OF CHIP DESIGNER NVIDIA

"The world for consumer electronics has changed. It used to be about the device today it's really about the service."

"All of my colleagues at Sony are obsessed about bringing a software sensibility into that company."

"I think they are making that transformation. As a large company it takes a little bit more time."

ENRIQUE SALEM, CEO OF SOFTWARE MAKER SYMANTEC CORP .

"Sony has a great brand. Let's not lose sight of its iconic consumer brand."

"I would be very focused on a narrower set of products. If you look at what's happened at Sony over the last 15 years, they've diversified their portfolio and I would pick one or two things I wanted to spend all of my time on, to make sure they are the very best in the market."

"They do have some pretty impressive technologies. The Sony Vaio was as effective as the MacBook Air. They just need to pick a few to focus on."

"PlayStation could be the central point of the home entertainment system and they've put a lot of resources into that."

ANNE BOUVEROT, HEAD OF MOBILE SERVICES, ORANGE

"I think this is a difficult subject, and I wouldn't pretend that we know best. But I think it's incredibly important that when you handle customer data, whatever your business, it's very important to have strong processes and good security rules in terms of how you use this data."

"I believe that this is something that we as operators are very careful about, because we know the level of sensitivity that is associated with that.

"We cannot say that we will never have issues like that, but it's about processes, about rules and then it's about reacting in terms of communicating about the major crisis which can happen regarding security. And in the end it's about how you communicate with the consumers."

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