Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

Chilaquiles are great for a big group because there are plenty of options to appease those with dietary restrictions. (Tim Fraser For The Globe and Mail)
Chilaquiles are great for a big group because there are plenty of options to appease those with dietary restrictions. (Tim Fraser For The Globe and Mail)

Chilaquiles Add to ...

I used organic corn tortillas for the chips but you could skip this step and buy tortilla chips. Dried whole chilies are available at some supermarkets, spice shops and Latin American stores. Queso fresco is a slightly salty crumbly white cheese – substitute with a mild feta.

  • Preparation time: 25 minutes
  • Ready time: 1 hour and 30 minutes
  • Servings: 4 to 6

Ingredients

Tortilla chips:

20 corn tortillas

2 tbsp vegetable oil

Tomatillo sauce:

1 lb tomatillos, peeled and halved

1 large yellow onion, peeled and roughly chopped

1 cup packed cilantro

2 cloves of garlic

1/4 cups of water

Salt and freshly ground pepper

Chorizo:

5 dried New Mexico chilies

1 tbsp ground cumin

1 tbsp white vinegar

1 1/2 tsp salt

1 tsp cayenne

1 1/2 lbs ground pork

1 tbsp vegetable oil

Garnish:

1 cup grated queso fresco

1/2 cup chopped cilantro

1 avocado, sliced

1/2 cup chopped cilantro

1 avocado, sliced

1/2 cup green onions, sliced

1 cup slivered red onion

1/2 cup sour cream

1/2 cup canned black beans, drained and rinsed

Method

Preheat oven to 350 F. Brush corn tortillas lightly with oil and slice each into six triangles. Place on two baking sheets and bake for 10 to 12 minutes or until golden. Set aside.

Place peeled tomatillos, onion, cilantro, garlic and water in a large pot to cook. Let simmer for 20 to 25 minutes, or until tomatillos have broken down, stirring occasionally if needed to shift the uncooked pieces down to the bottom.

Spoon tomatillo sauce into blender or processor and puree until smooth. Add salt and pepper to taste. Reserve.

Soak chilies in 1 cup of hot water for 10 minutes or until softened. Drain chiles, reserving liquid. Place chiles in food processor and process until smooth, scraping down as needed. Mix cumin, vinegar, salt and cayenne into the chili paste and process until well combined. Add reserved chili water by the teaspoon to form a thick paste.

Stir 2 tbsp chili paste into pork. Let sit for half an hour. Test seasoning by frying a small piece of pork. Add more paste, salt or pepper as needed.

Heat 1 tbsp vegetable oil in a large, non-stick skillet over high heat. Cook pork, breaking up the bits until crumbly, 6 to 8 minutes. Reserve.

Add tomatillo sauce and tortillas to skillet. Stir until coated.and chips soften slightly. Crumble in queso. Remove from heat and pile on to a platter. Garnish with cilantro, avocado, red onions, green onion, sour cream, black beans and chorizo. Top each portion with a fried egg, if desired.

Suggested Wine Pairings

Brunch makes me think of bloody Caesars. This brunch makes me think of tequila bloody Caesars. The herbaceous verve of Mexico’s national spirit resonates better than neutral vodka with the lively elements here. If you’re not timid about booze, go with one part tequila to two parts Clamato juice on ice in a tumbler garnished with a lime wedge. Wine? Smoky-herbal Chilean carmenere is a fine red choice. Consider a zippy-fruity Chilean sauvignon blanc if you prefer white. Beer is another, and perhaps the most obvious, option. I can’t condone the watery Mexican big-brands, though, not when there’s so many good micro-brewed, bracingly hoppy pilsners in the world. - Beppi Crosariol

In the know

Most popular videos »

Highlights

More from The Globe and Mail

Most popular